World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans

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World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans

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World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans

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World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans

95 Collections results for World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans

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Japanese Americans turning in radio, guns, and cameras

Photograph showing a group of Japanese Americans gathered around a table, turning in radios, guns and cameras. Cameras can be seen on the table, in front of two seated men taking notes. Likely taken at the Portland Police Bureau? (negative 2 of 2).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Japanese Americans turning in radio, guns, and cameras

Photograph showing a group of Japanese Americans gathered around a table, turning in radios, guns and cameras. Two of the men are standing next to a radio floor unit, while two seated men at the table look downward. A Japanese American man standing near the center of the table appears to have placed a camera on the table. Likely taken at the Portland Police Bureau? (negative 1 of 2).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Minoru Yasui, Japanese American testing legality of curfew law

Photograph showing Minoru Yasui, wearing a suit with arms folded behind his back. Born in Hood River, and later becoming a lawyer after attending the University of Oregon Law School, Yasui questioned the legality of curfew laws imposed on Japanese Americans in Portland. On March 28, 1942 he deliberately broke a military curfew law in Portland, by walking around downtown and presenting himself for arrest (negative 1 of 2).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

James Takeo Akamatsu, applying for license to reopen business, with Joe Hutchinson of city license bureau, Portland

James Takeo Akamatsu, signing a document at the City License Bureau in Portland, as Joe Hutchinson watches from across a counter. Akamatsu was the first Japanese American in Portland to apply to reopen his business after returning from an incarceration camp in Hunt, Idaho. A story about Akamatsu was published on page 9 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, January 30, 1945 (negative 1 of 2).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Tsuboi Family Home Movie - [Compilation short reels]

Compilation of several short reels of Tsuboi family home movies, featuring footage of the Tsuboi family, the Rose Festival parade, laborers working in hops fields, and more. Footage is in black-and-white and color.
00:00 - Scenes of the Tsuboi family children playing on the beach at the Oregon coast in the early 1950s
02:00 - Scenes of the Tsuboi family in the early 1950s
04:00 - Scenes of the Rose Festival parade, possibly in 1956.
06:00 - Demolition of a building in downtown Portland
07:58 - Scenes of the Tsuboi family in the early 1950s. Children playing, family visits a cemetery, family at the Oregon coast. Scenes from a child's birthday party.
12:00 - Scenes from the 1956 Rose Festival parade, including footage of Jimmy Dodd, Bob Amsberry, and several original Mouseketeers from the Mickey Mouse Club. Several Disney-themed floats.
16:00 - Scenes of the Tsuboi family and a visit to the eastern side of the Columbia River Gorge in the early 1950s. Children playing on the beach on the Oregon coast.
18:00 - Scenes of the Rose Festival parade in the 1950s, including footage of a Japanese Boy Scout float
21:50 - Scenes of the Tsuboi family in the early 1950s. Children playing in the water at the Oregon coast.
23:54 - Scattered buildings at the Minidoka Relocation Center. The Minidoka Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese and Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated. Followed by a brief shot inside of a busy store, possibly the Tsuboi Brothers Store.
24:19 - Portland Rose Garden. The footage is overexposed.
28:41 - Scenes of laborers in a hops field in the 1930s. Scenes of the farm laborers' camp. Horses on a farm.

Tsuboi family

Tule Lake photographs

Photographs taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other members of the Yasutome family documenting their time at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California. These images include portraits of the Yasutome family, including Jerry Yasutome’s son, James Mamoru Yasutome, and his parents, Sadao Kurata Yasutome and Ju Jiro Yasutome; group portraits of electrical workers and a Buddhist Sunday School; and photos of a fire at the center. Between 1942 and 1946 the Yasutome family was incarcerated by the United States government at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated during World War II. The Yasutomes' son, James Mamoru Yasutome was born at Tule Lake in 1943.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Jerry Jiro Yasutome and James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome kneeling next to his 2-year-old son, James Mamoru Yasutome at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They both look at the camera and smile. Mamoru's face is blurry. Taken January 12, 1946. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jiro Yasutome and Momoru (sic) (James) Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center. 1/12/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome and James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome standing behind his 2-year-old son, James Mamoru Yasutome at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They both look at the camera and smile. Taken January 12, 1946. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jiro (Jerry) Yasutome and Momoru (sic) (James) Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center. 1/12/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of James Mamoru Yasutome kneeling on the ground at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. He is 2-years-old. There is an exterior wall of a building behind him. Taken in January 1946. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "Jim," and, "Momoru (sic) at Tule Lake. 1/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome standing outside with his hands in his pockets, looking at the camera. Taken at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in January 1946. A portion of a building is visible in the background. There is a decorative flower edge on the right side of the print. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "Jiro Yasutome (Jerry), Jim's father," and, "1/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Yasutome Family, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of 4 members of the Yasutome family standing outside at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. Pictured left to right are JuJiro Yasutome, Sadao Yasutome, Toshiko Yasutome, and 2-year-old James Mamoru Yasutome (in front). There is snow on the ground. The three adults look at the camera while Mamoru looks off to the right. Taken December 20, 1945. Handwritten note on back reads, "G'father JuJiro Yasutome, Sadao Yasutome, Toshiko Yasutome, Momoru (sic) Yasutome." Additional note gives Mamoru's birthdate, "4/23/43, Mamoru 2 yrs. 8 mo." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome standing outside with his hands in his pockets, looking at the camera. Taken at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in January 1946. Buildings are visible in the background. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jiro (Jerry) Yasutome, taken at Tule Lake Relocation Center," and, "1/26/46." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Yasutome Family, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Sadao Kurata Yasutome, Jim's paternal grandmother (left) standing next to an unidentified woman at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They stand side by side outside, and there is snow on the ground. A building is visible in the background. Taken on December 20, 1945. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "Sadao Kurata Yasutome, Jim's paternal g'mother (on left)," and, "12/20,1945." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Jerry Jiro Yasutome and James Mamoru Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Jerry Jiro Yasutome kneeling and holding his 2-year-old son James Mamoru Yasutome at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. They are outside, kneeling on the ground in front of a building. Both look at the camera. Taken in January 1946. Handwritten note on back reads, "1/-/46. Jiro & Mamoru Yasutome (James)." The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Toshiko Morioka Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Toshiko Morioka Yasutome standing in front of a building at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. She is the mother of James Mamoru Yasutome. She wears a skirt and has her hands crossed at her waist in front. There is a decorative flower edge on the right side of the print. Handwritten notes on photograph read, "1-1-46," and, "Toshiko Morioka Yasutome. Jim's mother." This is a duplicate cropped print of photograph OrgLot762_B1F1_010. The date handwritten on this print (01/01/46) is inconsistent with the date written on the duplicate print (01/27/46). The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Toshiko Morioka Yasutome, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Photograph of Toshiko Morioka Yasutome standing in front of a building at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. She is the mother of James Mamoru Yasutome. There is snow on the ground. She wears a skirt and has her hands crossed at her waist in front. Handwritten notes on back read, "Toshiko Moriaka (sic) Yasutome (mother of James M. Yasutome)," and, "1/27/46." This is a duplicate print of photograph OrgLot762_B1F1_009. The date handwritten on this print (01/27/46) is inconsistent with the date written on the duplicate print (01/01/46).The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Electrical workers, Tule Lake Relocation Center

Two men climb an electrical pole at the Tule Lake Relocation Center. Smoke from the high school gym fire is visible in the background. Handwritten note on the back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames. Handwritten note on front indicates this is the gym. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames. There is a person in the foreground. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire Engine at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of a fire engine in front of the Tule Lake High School gym fire. A long hose extends from the truck and flames are visible in the background. Handwritten note on back indicates the gym was also the recreation hall, and that this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames. There is a long hose in the foreground and a small group of people watch the fire. Handwritten note on back indicates that the gym was also the recreation hall, and that this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames and several scattered people watch the fire. Smoke rises from the fire. Handwritten note on back indicates that the gym was also the recreation hall, and that this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire Engine at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of a fire engine in front of the Tule Lake High School gym fire. The gym burns in the background and 2 large smoke plumes rise into the air. A few people stand by the fire engine. Handwritten note on back indicates the gym was also the recreation hall, and that this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames. There is a long hose in the foreground and a small group of people watch the fire. Handwritten note on front reads, "TL Hi-Gym." Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Fire at Tule Lake High School Gym

Photograph of the Tule Lake High School gym on fire. The building is engulfed in flames. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken December 31, 1945. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Yasutome family

Electrical Department Crew, Group Photograph

Posed photograph of the crew of the electric shop at the Tule Lake Relocation Center, taken September 12, 1945. Jerry Jiro Yasutome stands in the back row, fourth from left. A sign in front of the group reads: Electrical Department, Warehouse 348. A list of names on the back of the photograph identifies each crew member. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated.

Japanese Americans in detention center at Pacific International Livestock Exposition building

Milton Maeda and Molly Kageyama being married while detained at the Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland. Kageyama is shaking hands with E. Sandquist, assembly center manager, while Maeda holds her waist. After Executive Order 9066, the building served as a temporary detention center for Japanese Americans, From May through September of 1942, awaiting eventual transfer to more permanent incarceration centers. This photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, May 20, 1942 (negative 2 of 15).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Japanese Americans in detention center at Pacific International Livestock Exposition building

Photograph showing a Japanese American woman and child (Jimmy) detained at the Pacific International Livestock Exposition building in Portland. The child is seated in a rough wooden high chair, in front of a table with plates of food and mugs. Other people are seated along the long table. After Executive Order 9066, the building served as a temporary detention center for Japanese Americans, From May through September of 1942, awaiting eventual transfer to more permanent incarceration centers. This photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Sunday, May 31, 1942 (negative 1 of 15).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

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