oral histories (literary works)

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oral histories (literary works)

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oral histories (literary works)

334 Collections results for oral histories (literary works)

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Oral history interview with Bertha Holt

  • SR 1059
  • Collection
  • 1984

This oral history interview with Bertha Holt was conducted by an unidentified interviewer circa 1984. The interviewer's questions have been edited out.

In this interview, Holt discusses her early life and marriage to Harry Holt. She speaks at length about adopting children from South Korea and founding Holt International Children's Services with Harry Holt. She talks about the death of Harry Holt. She describes her passion for her work facilitating intercounty adoption from South Korea.

The audio recording ends with a 1961 audio letter that Harry Holt sent to Martha Sue, one of the children whose adoption he helped to arrange. In the audio letter, Holt talks about his work helping orphaned children in Seoul, South Korea, and tells the story of Martha Sue's adoption process.

Holt, Bertha

Oral history interview with Timothy J. Gauthier

This oral history interview with Timothy J. Gauthier was conducted by Jim Strassmaier and recorded on video by Michael O'Rourke in the offices of the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) in Portland, Oregon, on September 24, 2008. The interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Labor Oral History Program, which collects oral histories of individuals who have advocated for working people of Oregon.

In this interview, Gauthier discusses his family background and early life in Santa Barbara, California, including his memories of the anti-war protests during the 1960s, surfing, and his family's political and religious beliefs. He talks about his experience at Santa Barbara City College and at Southern Utah State College (now Southern Utah University). He discusses working for the NECA, including his job duties of working with local union chapters and conducting labor negotiations. He also talks about working with the IBEW. He describes the benefits the NECA provides to its members. He speaks about coming to Portland, Oregon, in the early 1980s and working alongside Ed Barnes of IBEW Local 48. He talks about how the recession of the early 1980s affected union members and labor negotiations, and describes NECA's and IBEW's response. He speaks at length about the establishment and success of the Market Recovery Program, which uses union dues to supplement union wages. He also talks about opposition and legal challenges to the program.

Gauthier discusses working with labor attorneys during labor negotiations. He talks about creating a drug testing program and explains the reasons why he felt drug testing was important for union members. He then describes the process of winning job contracts, including how the Market Recovery Program helps. He speaks about the mission and objectives of NECA; describes several of NECA's programs and organizational partnerships; and talks about national recognition for the Oregon-Columbia NECA chapter. He talks about the future of NECA, as well as NECA's charitable work. He closes the interview by discussing his family life.

Gauthier, Timothy J. (Timothy John), 1958-

Oral history interview with Raymond W. Nyls

  • SR 1031
  • Collection
  • 1992-04-04 - 1992-09-12

This oral history interview with Raymond W. Nyls was conducted by Kathleen A. Mitchell in Salem, Philomath, and Portland, Oregon, from April 4 to September 12, 1992. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted in Salem, Oregon, on April 4, 1992, Nyls discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Wauna, Warrenton, and Astoria, including learning to swim, the divorce of his parents, and his memories of the amusement park at Jantzen Beach. He also talks about family trips by train. He speaks at length about his childhood recreational activities, games, and hobbies. He also talks about his relationship with his step-father. He discusses his interest in military history and geology.

In the second interview session, conducted at the Benton County Historical Museum in Philomath, Oregon, on April 25, 1992, Nyls continues discussing his early life in Portland and Wauna, including his memories of the amusement park at Jantzen Beach, his social life during his teenage years, and his relationship with his step-father. He speaks about his step-father's work as a sawyer at sawmills in the company town of Wauna, describes the town, and discusses his education. He describes the houses he lived in, speaks about his recreational activities and childhood games, and discusses the Japanese American population in Wauna. He then looks at photographs of Wauna and talks about them, as well as a fire that burned down the town's school house.

In the third interview session, conducted at the Benton County Historical Museum in Philomath on May 30, 1992, Nyls continues discussing his early life in Wauna, including his social life. He describes the railroad service to Wauna. He again looks at photographs of Wauna and talks about them, as well as the fire that burned down the town's schoolhouse. He briefly discusses living in a small town near Westport during the Depression. He then talks about living in the sawmill company town of Warrenton, including his education, his involvement with sports, and fishing in the Skipanon River. He also talks about his social life in Warrenton. He discusses living in Astoria, particularly his experience during high school, including dating, playing in a band, and his experience in the National Guard. He also briefly describes a photograph of his family picking hops during the Depression. He speaks about roller skating, dancing, and drinking alcohol.

In the fourth interview session, conducted in Philomath on June 20, 1992, Nyls discusses living in Portland and working for the Forest Service through the National Youth Association. He then talks about working for Boeing in Seattle, Washington, in the years before World War II and about joining the Army Air Corps. He speaks about morale at Boeing after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and describes his feelings about the U.S. government's incarceration of Japanese Americans. He describes his Army Air Corps training at length, including both boot camp and flight training. He also talks about his marriage to Lucile Tinker.

In the fifth interview session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland on July 26, 1992, Nyls looks at photographs dating from the Korean War, describes them, and speaks at length about his experiences as an engineering officer and fighter pilot during that war. He also shares his thoughts about friendly fire and the United States military. He discusses training other fighter pilots and speaks at length about training to become an engineering officer at the end of World War II. He also talks about his marriage to Peggy Garver and the death of his mother. He discusses the differences in the way the Air Force fought during World War II and in the Korean War and speaks about his career in the Air Force after the war's end.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted in Philomath on September 12, 1992, Nyls looks at photographs from his career in the Air Force after the Korean War and describes them. He talks about serving as a squadron commander, describes serving on an Air Force base in Alaska during the Cold War, and shares his experiences serving at Camp Adair during the 1962 Columbus Day Storm. He talks about his reasons for settling in Eugene after retiring from the Air Force and reflects on his career, revisiting the topics of his service during World War II and the Korean War. He also describes more photographs. He discusses his children, their families, and their careers; shares his opinion about the Gulf War; and speaks at length about his hobbies, including his interest in history, geology, and astronomy. He closes the interview by talking about his work as a UFO investigator while in the Air Force.

Nyls, Raymond W. (Raymond Woodrow), 1920-2019

Oral history interview with Annette M. Bartholomae

  • SR 1055
  • Collection
  • 1992-08-27 - 1992-09-03

This oral history interview with Annette M. Bartholomae was conducted by Sieglinde Smith from August 27 to September 3, 1992. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 27, 1992, Bartholomae discusses her family background and talks about her adoptive family. She describes her early life in Portland, Oregon, including her early education and recreational activities. She also talks about her early interest in reading and libraries. She speaks about her experience at Reed College. She then talks about studying library science at Columbia University in New York. She also talks about working as a children's librarian at the Arleta library branch in Portland.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 3, 1992, Bartholomae discusses working as head librarian at the library in Pocatello, Idaho, and describes her life there. She then talks about working as a librarian for the U.S. Army's Camp White in Medford, Oregon, during World War II. She also talks about meeting her future husband, George Bartholomae, while working at the army camp, and discusses his experiences during World War I and II. She then discusses working as social services librarian at Portland State University, including taking classes at the university. She discusses working at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library at the end of her professional career. She also talks about working as a librarian at the Multnomah County Public Library. She describes her master's thesis for PSU, talks about her interest in Civil War history, and discusses the origins of her name. She closes the interview by talking about her education at library school.

Bartholomae, Annette M. (Annette Martha), 1908-1997

Oral history interview with Clyde Rice

  • SR 1054
  • Collection
  • 1985-01-22 - 1985-03-13

This oral history interview with Clyde Rice was conducted by Rick Harmon at Rice's home in Clackamas, Oregon, from January 22 to March 13, 1985. The interview was conducted in seven sessions. The audio on tapes 3, 4, 6, and 13 is affected by speed issues.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 22, 1985, Rice discusses his family background, particularly his father's flavor extract business. He talks about his early life in Portland and Salem, including his family's Christian Science faith, his social life, and his relationship with his family.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 29, 1985, Rice continues discussing his early life in Portland and Salem, including his family's Christian Science faith. He tells several anecdotes about his early school life; describes racism he observed; and shares his memories of World War I.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 7, 1985, Rice discusses his involvement with the Portland Art Museum School (now known as the Pacific Northwest College of Art), including the professors and curators. He talks about the artistic community in Portland and discusses his own art. He revisits the topic of racism that he observed and Portland politics in the early 20th century.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 14, 1985, Rice continues discussing Portland politics in the early 20th century. He then talks about homesteading in Clackamas County during the 1930s and describes clearing the land, hunting, and farming. He discusses returning to Portland a few years later and working for his father's flavor extract business. He talks about his marriage to Marguerite Evelyn "Nordi" Nordstrom, and about meeting his second wife, Virginia Lee Broms.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 21, 1985, Rice describes building a rammed earth house in the Mt. Scott neighborhood of Portland during the late 1930s. He speaks at length about his affair with Virginia Lee Broms. He also revisits the topic of working for his father's flavor extract business. He talks about spending time in Alaska before his divorce from Nordi Rice, his marriage to Virginia Lee Broms, and how both events affected his son.

In the seventh and final interview session, conducted on March 13, 1985, Rice continues discussing his development as an author. He describes the years-long process of writing and publishing his first novel, "A Heaven in the Eye." He also talks about plans to publish his other writings.

Rice, Clyde, 1903-1998

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1067
  • Collection
  • 1992

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by Allan F. Schulte, Hart's grandson, in 1992. The interview was recorded on the audiocassettes out of order.

In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, as well as his education at Moran School and Stanford University. He talks about investigating the Red Squad in Portland while he was an assistant U.S. attorney; about his time in the Department of Justice; and about his work prosecuting a case against the American Medical Association. He discusses getting drafted into the Army and his experiences in the Pacific theater during World War II. He speaks about being chairman of Maurine Neuberger's election campaign in 1960. He discusses his law career, including cases he worked on; working with Lindsay, Hart, Neil & Weigler in Portland; and nearly being appointed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by sharing his childhood memories of World War I.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting

  • SR 1092
  • Collection
  • 2019-07-01 - 2019-12-02

This oral history interview with Vince Whiting was conducted by Kim L. Andrews from July 1 to December 2, 2019, at the Brookwood branch of the Washington County Public Library in Hillsboro, Oregon. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 1, 2019, Whiting discusses the life and career of his first wife, Pat Whiting. He talks about her education at San Jose State University and their early marriage. He discusses his own education at San Jose State University, Chico State University, and Oregon State University and his plan to become a veterinarian. He also briefly talks about his wife at the time of the interview, Amira Whiting. He discusses Pat Whiting's service in the Oregon State Legislature, including her work on legislation regarding the ban of chlorofluorocarbons, and describes her personality. Whiting briefly discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois. He then talks about moving to Oregon with Pat Whiting around 1968, and his career with GlaxoSmithKline. He discusses Pat Whiting's political philosophy and speaks at length about her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and how she interacted with her constituents. He speaks about the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, her interest in environmentalism, and the environmental legislation she worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting's views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting's work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

Oral history interview with Amo R. DeBernardis

  • SR 2079
  • Collection
  • 1993-04-09 - 1993-11-05

This oral history interview with Amo R. DeBernardis was conducted by Corbett S. Gottfried from April 9 to November 5, 1993. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 9, 1993, DeBernardis discusses his family background and early life in the Portland, Oregon, area, including jobs he did during his childhood. He speaks at length about his early education and his teachers. He talks about his experience studying engineering at Oregon State University, including his classes, teachers, and how he decided to become a teacher. He also discusses his involvement in designing the Bonneville Dam while in college. He then talks about working as a shop teacher at Ockley Green Elementary School in Portland and working with students. He speaks briefly about his master's thesis, then talks about switching to becoming an education administrator and shares his philosophy on what makes a good administrator. He talks about his wife, Jessie Genevieve Hulery, and their children. He describes his service training officers in the U.S. Navy during World War II.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 16, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II and talks about the changes in education after the war. He describes working with Portland Public Schools in the late 1940s and 1950s; talks about his main accomplishments; and describes his educational philosophy. He then speaks about the beginnings of adult education in Oregon and about serving as Portland Community College's first president from 1961 to 1979. He describes the various programs PCC offered, the development of its campuses, and the opposition the fledgling college faced. He talks about the relationship between PCC and Portland Public Schools, other community colleges in the Portland Metro area, and about the Oregon State Department of Education. He discusses tuition rates and the value of the classes that PCC offers.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 23, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He continues talking about the development of PCC's campuses and the value of the classes that PCC offers. He speaks about the business model of higher education, the formation of the community college district, and the teachers union. He talks about members of the PCC board during his presidency, teachers they hired, and his management style. He discusses PCC's curriculum and how it compared to a traditional four-year college and talks about the accreditation process.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on May 24, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He talks about meeting the academic and personal needs of the students during the 1960s and 1970s. He describes the student services that PCC provided; talks about the value of vocational education programs; and shares his opinion on college athletic programs. He discusses the job placement programs at PCC, the role of the Oregon and federal departments of education, and the Oregon Community College Association. He also talks about the role of the Oregon Legislature in the development of PCC. He describes the mission of Portland Community College.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on June 10, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He continues describing the mission of Portland Community College and revisits the topics of PCC's hiring practices and his major accomplishments during his presidency. He also discusses his failures and conflicts. He talks about his relationships with presidents at other community colleges in Oregon, budgeting concerns for a college, and PCC's relationship with Oregon 4-year colleges. He then speaks about his retirement activities and reflects on the challenges of leading a college. He also shares his philosophy on life.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted on November 5, 1993, DeBernardis continues discussing his service as Portland Community College's first president. He speaks at length about the early development of PCC. He discusses how PCC differs from a traditional junior college, talks about the growth of the college, and describes the development of the student transfer program. He talks about hiring and firing teachers, his role as president of the college, and the decision-making process. He reflects on some of the decisions he was responsible for as president. He revisits the topic of his leadership philosophy and discusses the organizational structure of PCC.

DeBernardis, Amo R. (Amo Richard), 1913-2010

Oral history interview with Norm Costa

This oral history interview with Norm Costa was conducted by Stephanie Munly and Ruben Reynaga from November 13-20, 2000. Munly and Reynaga conducted the interview for the Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest as part of Professor Ann Mussey's senior capstone class on LGBTQ history at Portland State University. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 13, 2000, Costa discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, from California in 1958. He talks about his experiences as an out gay man during that time, about his relationships, and about his career as a hairdresser. He discusses raising his niece, and his relationship with his mother. He talks about gay bars and clubs in Portland; discusses his work for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases; and talks about his work advocating for gay rights. He also briefly talks about racism within the gay community. He speaks at length about his work with AIDS/HIV patients, and talks about the history of public policy toward the disease. He talks about social conditions for young LGBTQ people from when he first came out as gay in 1947 to the time of the interview in 2000; describes the history of policing in the gay community; and talks about serving on the board of the Sexual Minorities Roundtable.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 20, 2000, Costa continues discussing his service on the board of the Sexual Minorities Roundtable. He talks about Portland Police Chief Mark Kroeker, the No on Measure 9 campaign, and his other political and advocacy work. He shares a story about being arrested in California in the late 1940s and serving time in San Quentin State Prison. He closes the interview by discussing issues facing the LGBTQ community in the 21st century.

Costa, Norm (Norman Robert), 1927-

Oral history interview with Charles L. Sauvie

This oral history interview with Charles L. Sauvie was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Portland, Oregon, on May 3, 1988. In this interview, Sauvie briefly discusses his family background, early life, and early career as an economist. He then speaks at length about his career as an economist for the Oregon State Department of Planning and Development. He speaks about the report of the state's tax structure prepared by Professor Nicholas Sly; talks about his involvement on the Oregon Economic Advisory Committee; and describes some of the projects he worked on while in the planning department. He also talks about working with Governor Mark Hatfield and his staff, particularly Sam Mallicoat. He speaks at length about his efforts to attract business to Oregon. He closes the interview by talking about the role of Glenn Jackson in Oregon's economic development.

Sauvie, Charles L. (Charles Louis)

Oral history interview with Marty B. Gold

This oral history interview with Marty B. Gold was conducted by Clark Hansen at Gold's office in Washington, D.C., from June 13-16, 1988. The interview was conducted in two sessions; collection includes a transcript.

In the first interview session, conducted on June 13, 1988, Gold discusses his family background and early life in New York City and Miami Beach, Florida, including his early political beliefs. He discusses attending American University in Washington, D.C., including his involvement in Republican politics. He talks about how he came to be aware of Mark Hatfield; about Republican party politics in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly the 1968 presidential election; and about Hatfield's stance on controversial issues such as abortion and the Vietnam War. He then briefly describes his service in Vietnam. Gold discusses his work as a legal assistant to Hatfield from 1972 to 1979, while Hatfield was a U.S. senator. He talks about his duties, including applying for grants, sitting in on committee meetings, and legislation he was involved with. He also discusses other members of Hatfield's staff, Hatfield's personality, and Hatfield's re-election campaigns.

In the second interview session, conducted on June 16, 1988, Gold continues to discuss his work as a legal assistant to Hatfield. He talks about being named Outstanding Young Man in America in 1977, about Hatfield's filibuster on legislation about the draft, and about leaving Hatfield's staff to work for U.S. Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee. He closes the interview by discussing the changes in the U.S. Senate during his time there and his political philosophy.

Gold, Martin B., 1947-

Oral history interview with Frank C. Cook

This oral history interview with Frank C. Cook was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Irish Inn in Ashland, Oregon, from November 29-30, 1989. The interview was conducted in two sessions; collection includes a transcript and a photograph of Cook.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 29, 1989, Cook discusses his family background and early life in Southern California, including his family's involvement with conservative Republican politics and his father's suicide. He discusses attending Occidental College in Los Angeles, California; his involvement with the Quaker movement and Buddhism; and the evolution of his political beliefs. He talks about serving in the National Guard from 1967 to 1968, during the Vietnam War. Cook discusses beginning to work as an aide to U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1969.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 30, 1989, Cook continues to discuss working as an aide to Hatfield from 1969 to 1973. He talks about Hatfield's political career, including Hatfield's role in coaching California Governor Ronald Reagan and how Hatfield's views on the Vietnam War affected his political career and his family. He talks about writing speeches for Hatfield, his work on anti-draft legislation, and other members of Hatfield's staff, particularly Gerry Frank. He also talks about other legislation he worked on for Hatfield, particularly the Neighborhood Government Act; about Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign; and about his work on Middle East issues. He closes the interview by discussing the possibilities for Hatfield's future career.

Cook, Frank C. (Franklin Charles), 1944-

Oral history interview with John E. Jaqua

This oral history interview with John E. Jaqua was conducted by Donald W. Brodie at the law offices of Jaqua and Wheatley in Eugene, Oregon, from October 5 to November 1, 2000.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 5, 2000, Jaqua briefly discusses his family background and early life, his service as a Marine in the Pacific theater during World War II, and his experience at Pomona College in Claremont, California. He then talks about his experience at the University of Oregon Law School in Eugene, Oregon, including his professors and classes. He discusses practicing law in Eugene, including cases he handled, judges he argued before, and his involvement with the American Bar Association. He also talks about running a cattle ranch in Springfield, Oregon.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 17, 2000, Jaqua continues discussing practicing law in Eugene, including judges he argued before, other Eugene lawyers, and his involvement with the Oregon Bar Association.

In the third interview session, conducted on October 25, 2000, Jaqua continues discussing practicing law in Eugene, including some of the clients he represented and working with lawyers from Japan. He speaks at length about his involvement with Nike, Inc., including serving on the board, helping to set up factories in Japan, and his friendship with Nike cofounder Bill Bowerman.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on November 1, 2000, Jaqua discusses his involvement with the University of Oregon Capital Campaign to construct a new building for the law school. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities and his memories of lawyer and University of Oregon Law School Dean Orlando Hollis.

Jaqua, John E. (John Evans), 1920-2009

Oral history interview with Norman Sepenuk

This oral history with Norman Sepenuk was conducted by Jeffrey Batchelor at Sepenuk's home in Black Butte, Oregon, from March 5-7, 1993, and on September 22, 2002. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 5, 1993, Sepenuk discusses his family background and early life in New Jersey, including his education. He then talks about his experience at Princeton University, including some of his professors and classes, his involvement in the ROTC, and his social life. He also talks about discrimination he faced as a Jewish person. He then talks about his service in the U.S. Army from 1954 to 1956. He talks about his experience at Harvard Law School, including some of his professors, classes, and classmates. He describes practicing law in Jersey City after his graduation in 1959.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 6, 1993, Sepenuk discusses leaving his law practice to work for the Department of Justice Tax Division in Washington, D.C. He talks about the relationship between the Department of Justice and the U.S. Supreme Court, cases he worked on, lawyers he worked with, and judges he argued before. He also talks about his marriage to Barbara Hammond. He then talks about being called to Oregon in 1965 to assist on a case. He describes relocating to Oregon and working as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1965 to 1972, with a focus on white collar crime. He talks about his fellow assistant U.S. attorneys, cases he worked on, and judges he argued before. He particularly talks about his relationships with Judge Gus Solomon, Judge Robert Belloni, and U.S. Attorney Sid Lezak. He also talks about attending the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard from 1968 to 1969, and later returning to Washington, D.C., in 1971 as part of the Brown Commission. He then talks about leaving the U.S. attorney's office in 1972 and entering private practice in Portland, Oregon. He discusses focusing on white collar crime, describes his legal strategies, and compares the work of a prosecutor to that of a defense lawyer. He talks about cases he worked on and judges he argued before.

In the third interview session, conducted on March 7, 1993, Sepenuk continues to discuss working as a defense attorney focused on white collar crime, cases he worked on, and judges he argued before. He also talks about his involvement in various legal associations, changes in the legal field during his career, and sentencing guidelines, particularly with regard to drug related crimes. He discusses his health, his hobbies, his wife and children, and their careers. He closes the session by reflecting on his career and achievements, and by sharing his plans for the future.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on September 22, 2002, Sepenuk revisits the topic of judges that he argued before, including Helen Frye, Owen Panner, and Malcolm Marsh. He also talks about some of the cases he worked on. He then talks about his activities since the previous session, recorded a decade earlier, including his work as a volunteer lawyer in post-Communist countries, trying a case at The Hague, and cases he worked on in Oregon. He also revisits the topic of sentencing guidelines. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

Sepenuk, Norman

Oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton

  • SR 1076
  • Collection
  • 1991-09-10 - 1991-12-13

This oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton was conducted by Nancy Hawver from September 10 to December 13, 1991, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 10, 1991, Thornton discusses her family background and early life in Tillamook, Oregon, including her parents' involvement with the Tillamook Creamery Association. She talks about her early education, her recreational activities, and her early interest in art. She discusses a trip she took to Europe in 1935. She talks about her experiences in high school and at the University of Oregon. She also revisits the topics of the Tillamook Creamery Association and her early life in Tillamook. She discusses her marriage to Robert Y. Thornton and talks about his legal and political career.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 17, 1991, Thornton discusses her experience during World War II and talks about working in the blimp factory in Tillamook. She also talks about Robert Y. Thornton's service in the U.S. Army during the war. She discusses Robert Y. Thornton's study of Japanese and her own study of art. She then discusses living in Tillamook at the end of the war, talks about her involvement in the Tillamook Library Board, and about raising her son, Thomas Wells Thornton.

In the third interview session, conducted on November 22, 1991, Thornton discusses living in Salem after Robert Y. Thornton was elected to the Oregon State Legislature in 1950 and talks about her experiences as a wife of a politician, her involvement with the Bush House Auxiliary, and her interest in art and photography. She also talks about cases Robert Y. Thornton worked on as state attorney general.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on December 13, 1991, Thornton continues to discuss living in Salem, including her involvement in early childhood education. She also continues to discuss Robert Y. Thornton's career as state attorney general. She talks about her involvement in the Arts in Oregon Council and other arts organizations; describes her cornea transplant surgery; and discusses taking art classes. She talks about a trip she took to Japan in the late 1950s, about attending attorneys general conventions, and about the establishment of the Grove of the States in 1967. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement with the Portland Art Museum and other arts organizations.

Thornton, Dorothy H. (Dorothy Haberlach), 1913-2005

Oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti

  • SR 1074
  • Collection
  • 1987-03-26 - 1987-04-30

This oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, Oregon, from March 26 to April 30, 1987, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 26, 1987, Petti discusses her family background and early life in Vernonia, Oregon, including her family's history in the hotel business, her education, and her experience during the Depression. She talks about living and working in Portland during the Depression and describes how she came to work for Henry Thiele. She discusses her relationship with and marriage to Henry Thiele. She also talks about participating in illegal gambling and going to speakeasies in the 1930s.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 2, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her early life in Vernonia, including her family's history in the hotel business and taking piano lessons. She then continues discussing her marriage to Henry Thiele, and speaks at length about Thiele's life and career. She talks about managing the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, about serving alcohol after 1952, and about catering for the Kaiser shipyards during World War II. She discusses the menu at the Henry Thiele Restaurant, and talks about working with food suppliers. She then looks at photographs and talks about them.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 9, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her marriage to Henry Thiele and talks about their home in Lake Oswego. She talks about Henry Thiele's involvement with Christian Science. She also revisits the topic of managing Henry Thiele Restaurant, and discusses serving alcohol, talks about managing her staff, and shares the history of the restaurant. She shares her opinions on national politics. She describes a failed deal to sell the restaurant in 1986.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 30, 1987, Petti continues to discuss managing Henry Thiele Restaurant and talks about the restaurant's clientele. She also talks about her social life at the time of the interview in 1987. She then discusses her marriage to August Petti. She talks about her plans for the future and about traveling with August Petti. The interview closes with Petti looking at photographs and talking about them.

Petti, Margaret Thiele, 1916-2001

Oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider

  • SR 1075
  • Collection
  • 1985-04-18 - 1985-04-25

This oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider was conducted by Rick Harmon at the Schneiders' home in Portland, Oregon, from April 18-25, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 18, 1985, the Schneider brothers discuss their family history and early life in Portland. They speak at length about their first family home in Southeast Portland and they describe the appliances and utilities the house had in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They then describe the family home that they moved to in 1910. They also talk about the jobs they held, their education, and their recreational activities. They share their memories of Oaks Amusement Park, of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, and of the early Portland Rose Festival parades.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 25, 1985, the Schneider brothers continue to discuss their early life in Portland, including their recreational activities, their involvement with the Catholic Church, and their education. They also talk about their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company. They then discuss their experiences serving in the U.S. Army during World War I. Nicholas Schneider also talks about experiencing anti-German and anti-Catholic discrimination. They close the interview by revisiting the topic of their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company.

Schneider, Nicholas, 1892-1989

Oral history interview with Herbert A. Schroeder

  • SR 1078
  • Collection
  • 1975-03

This oral history interview with Herbert A. Schroeder was conducted in four sessions by Herman LeRoy Grafe in March 1975. Willis Raymond Grafe and Lois Lennox were also present and contributed to the interview. The audio of the first two interview sessions is very poor; there is bleed-through of choral music and the speakers' voices echo. The tapes also contain several minutes of unrelated audio content.

In the first interview session, Lois Lennox discusses her family background.

In the second interview session, Herbert Schroeder discusses his family background, including homesteading in Oregon, running a sawmill, and logging. He also talks about mining operations.

In the third interview session, Schroeder, Willis Raymond Grafe, and Herman LeRoy Grafe speak about family matters. They also revisit the topics of homesteading in Oregon, running a sawmill, and logging.

In the fourth interview session, Schroeder and Herman LeRoy Grafe have a casual conversation. Television is played loudly in the background.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Herbert Alfred), 1887-1984

Oral history interview with David Irving

  • SR 1084
  • Collection
  • 1992-02-05

This oral history interview with David Irving was conducted by Mark Flint on February 5, 1992. In this interview, Irving discusses working with Glenn Jackson at Pacific Power and Light Company, and speaks at length about Jackson's personality and accomplishments. He also talks about Glenn Jackson and Helen Jackson's marriage and Jackson's involvement in politics.

Irving, David

Oral history interview with Richard E. Groener

  • SR 1103
  • Collection
  • 1988-09-13 - 1989-03-25

This oral history interview with Richard Groener was conducted by Richard McConnell from September 13, 1988, to March 25, 1989. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 13, 1988, Groener discusses his early life in Oregon City, Oregon, including his experiences during the Depression. He speaks at length about working in Alaska in a cannery and mining gold. He talks about his experiences in the Merchant Marines during World War II, including spending time in China. He then talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party and why he first ran for elected office. He discusses his service in the Oregon House of Representatives and in the Oregon Senate from 1955 to 1982, including his political campaigns and his two primary defeats. He describes the garden-party style of fundraisers he often held, talks about his association with Wayne Morse, and shares his opinions of the Oregon governors who held office while he was in the Legislature.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 25, 1989, Groener briefly discusses a trip he took to Taiwan and revisits the topic of spending time in China during World War II. He speaks about labor legislation that came up during his time in the Legislature, about working with lobbyists, and about his relationship with the press. He discusses legislation he worked on, and closes the interview by talking about some of the people he served with.

Groener, Richard, 1917-

Oral history interview with Helen M. Brunner

  • SR 1302
  • Collection
  • 1989-01-21 - 1989-01-21

This oral history interview with Helen M. Brunner was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on January 21, 1989, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. In this interview, Brunner discusses her family background and talks about coming to Eugene, Oregon, in 1920. She talks about her education and studying to become an accountant at Eugene Business College. She discusses her early accounting jobs and experiences during the Depression. She then speaks about working as an accountant for Fred Meyer Inc. from 1940 to 1946. She talks about working with Herbert Retzlaff, shares her opinion on labor unions, and describes a typical work day. She speaks about the operations for Fred Meyer Inc., about the employee compensation, and about the Meyer family from the perspective of an employee. She closes the interview by discussing living in Portland during World War II.

Brunner, Helen M. (Helen Marie), 1905-2007

Oral history interview with Vera Prasilova Scott

  • SR 1450
  • Collection
  • 1990-04-07

This oral history interview with Vera Prasilova Scott was conducted by Shirley Tanzer at Scott's home in Portland, Oregon, on April 7, 1990. In this interview, Scott discusses her family background and early life in Churdim, now known as Vyoske Myto, Czech Republic, and speaks at length about her education. She then talks about studying photography with Frantisek Dritkol in Prague and at the Graphic Arts School of Munich in Germany just after the end of World War I. She also talks about meeting Arthur F. Scott in Munich, describes inflation in Germany in 1922 and 1923, and talks about her experiences in New York City the next year, including meeting Arthur F. Scott again. She speaks about her marriage to Scott. She talks about living in Houston, Texas, about running a photography studio, and about her friendship with the family of Robert Autrey. She discusses studying drawing and sculpture at Portland State University and closes the interview by talking about her parents' deaths and the arrival of her sister, Nadja Munk, in the United States just before the outbreak of World War II.

Scott, Vera Prasilova, 1899-1996

Oral history interview with Frances L. Van Hevelingen

  • SR 9329
  • Collection
  • 1978-04-20

This oral history interview with Frances L. Van Hevelingen was conducted by Charles Digregorio on April 20, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Deborah Frosaker and Mary Prittchard were also present. In this interview, Van Hevelingen discusses her family history and early life on a rose farm in the Willamette Valley. She talks about her encaustic painting technique, her art style, and her artistic process. She also talks about weaving as an art form. She speaks about the art community in the United States.

Van Hevelingen, Frances L. (Frances Lovetta), 1915-2002

Oral history interview with Jerry Weller

This oral history interview with Jerry Weller was conducted by Libbey Austin at Weller's home in Portland, Oregon, on May 10, 2007. Austin conducted the interview for the Gay and Lesbian Achives of the Pacific Northwest as part of Professor Christa Orth's senior capstone class on LGBTQ history at Portland State University. The collection includes a transcript of the interview.

In this interview, Weller discusses his early life in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, including his experiences as a young gay man at Penn State University. He talks about his relationship with Bruce Muller, describes how he became involved in the gay rights movement while living in the Bay Area, and discusses his reasons for moving to Portland in 1976. He discusses his involvement with the Portland Town Council, describes the anti-gay legislation that passed in many places in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s, and talks about his involvement with the national gay rights movement. He discusses the development of the Portland Town Council, the Right to Privacy PAC, and other gay rights organizations he was involved in. He also talks about the development in the language regarding LGBTQ people. He talks about his experiences in Washington, D.C., and in Chicago, Illinois, and his return to Portland in the 1980s. He discusses his relationship with the Shepherd family; describes his experience with AIDS; and speaks about gay rights legislation he was involved with. He closes the interview by talking about the role gay bars and drag queens played in the gay rights movement, about the growth of gay pride events, and about his favorite gay bars in Portland.

Weller, Jerry (Gerald K.), 1948-2018

Oral history interview with William H. Givler

  • SR 9325
  • Collection
  • 1978-05-17

This oral history interview with William H. Givler was conducted by Charles Digregorio at Givler's home in Portland, Oregon, on May 17, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. In this interview, Givler discusses his early life in Portland, including his early art education. He talks about studying art in New York. He then speaks about his career as a teacher and dean at the Museum Art School in Portland and talks about the development of the school. He discusses the future of the school. He also talks about his work in painting and printmaking, including his art style and artistic process. He closes the interview by discussing how he has changed as an artist.

Givler, William H., 1908-2000

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 9320
  • Collection
  • 1977-11-29

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Roberta Watts at the Oregonian Building in Portland, Oregon, on November 29, 1977, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his early life, education, and early jobs. He speaks about his career as an editorial cartoonist for the Oregonian newspaper; describes his artistic process; and reflects on some of the cartoons he drew. He closes the interview by talking about the training an editorial cartoonist should have.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Elisabeth Walton Potter

  • SR 9313
  • Collection
  • 1980-01-25

This oral history interview with Elisabeth Walton Potter was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Salem, Oregon, on January 25, 1980, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Potter discusses her education in art and architecture history at the University of Oregon and Penn State, and talks about some of her professors. She speaks about the origins of her interest in historic preservation, describes her training in public history, and talks about organizations related to historic preservation. She also talks about educational opportunities in public history in Oregon. She discusses her thesis on the topic of Methodist missionary architecture; talks about working as Oregon's first park historian; and speaks at length about her work with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and the National Register of Historic Places. She describes the process of nominating places for the register and talks about the many sites that she added during her tenure as coordinator of the National Register for the State Historic Preservation Office. She speaks about local preservation ordinances in Oregon and other states. She closes the interview by talking about the future of the register.

Potter, Elisabeth Walton, 1939-

Oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim

  • SR 1086
  • Collection
  • 1989-07-26 - 1989-09-13

This oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Heims' home in Portland, Oregon, from July 26 to September 13, 1989, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in five sessions. Adam C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 1 and 2; Clara C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 3 and 4; and both were interviewed together in session 5.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 26, 1989, Adam C. Heim discusses his family background, including his Russian and German heritage and his father's career with the Union Pacific Railroad Company. He talks about his early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, including his education and recreational activities. He speaks about working on a sugar beet farm in Idaho; about the Portland harbor; and about his apprenticeship as a machinist for the Union Pacific Railroad.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 2, 1989, Adam C. Heim talks about his siblings, particularly his older brother, John Adams Heim. He continues to discuss his career with the Union Pacific Railroad. He talks about his marriage to Clara C. Heim and about raising their children. He speaks about his experiences living in Huntington, Oregon, during the Depression, including the death of one of his children from spinal meningitis. He also discusses returning to Portland in the 1940s; talks about his children, their families, and their careers; and describes being injured during a robbery.

In the third interview session, conducted on August 29, 1989, Clara C. Heim discusses her family background and early life in North Portland. She talks about her siblings, their families, and their careers. She discusses her health as a child, her education, and working as a telephone operator.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on September 7, 1989, Clara C. Heim continues to discuss her early life in North Portland. She talks about her marriage to Adam C. Heim, about raising a family, and about her experiences during the Depression. She discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about life in Huntington, and about her political beliefs.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on September 13, 1989, Clara C. Heim and Adam C. Heim discuss living in and raising a family in Huntington and in North Portland during and after World War II. They also talk about the Black population in North Portland. They speak about their relationship with their children, about the changes in the Catholic Church, and about their political beliefs. They close the interview by talking about their recreational activities.

Heim, Adam C. (Adam Clarence), 1902-1995

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