Multnomah County (Or.)

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Code

45.54687, -122.41534 Map of Multnomah County (Or.)

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Multnomah County (Or.)

Associated terms

Multnomah County (Or.)

1445 Collections results for Multnomah County (Or.)

Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt awarding title of honorary deputy to Oregon Journal editor B. F. Irvine

Photograph showing Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt (left) pinning a badge (not visible) to the lapel of Oregon Journal editor Benjamin Franklin Irvine. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on January 22, 1932, under the headline “Sheriff of 36 Counties.” The photograph had the following caption: “B. F. Irvine, editor of The Journal, being presented with a gold star by Sheriff Martin Pratt, making him an honorary deputy sheriff in all of Oregon’s counties, in appreciation of his work in supporting peace officers.” Image note: The name “B. F. Irvine” is written on the negative and is faintly visible at the bottom of the image.

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Half-length portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name “Bill Genn” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name Bill Genn is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Portland? firefighters manning hoses

Photograph showing unidentified firefighters, probably from the Portland Fire Department, standing in a street and holding several hoses that are spraying water toward the left, at a target outside the frame. The firefighter in the center is wearing a helmet with a large number 1 on the front. Above the 1 are the words “FIRE BOAT,” and below it are the letters “PFD.”

Firefighter? on ladder above crowd

Photograph showing an unidentified man, possibly a firefighter, on a ladder extending horizontally over a crowd of people standing in the street, probably in downtown Portland. A brass band is in the background on the right. A sign for a Charles F. Berg store is visible on a building in the background on the left.

Fire at Pacific Stationery and Printing Company, Portland

Photograph of smoke pouring out of the the upper windows of the Pacific Stationery and Printing Co. building in Portland on July 29, 1926. Firefighters are gathered on the ground in front of the building and are climbing ladders to the upper windows. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, July 29, 1926, under the headline "Down-Town Fire Endangers Employes' Lives" (sic). The photograph had the following caption: "Photograph taken during the height of the fire at the Pacific Stationery & Printing Co.'s plant, No. 107 Second street, this afternoon. Loss in paper stock, office furniture and damage to the building was heavy. Some employes [sic], cut off by burning stairways, escaped by dropping to the roof of an adjoining building. Huge noon-hour crowds were attracted to the fire which was spectacular." The photograph accompanied a story titled "Fire Hits Printing Company." According to the story, one firefighter was injured and the financial loss from the fire was estimated at $185,000. The stationery company was located in downtown Portland on what is now Southwest 2nd Avenue between Southwest Washington and Southwest Harvey Milk streets.

Unveiling of David Campbell memorial, Portland

Photograph showing a crowd of seated people at the memorial to Portland Fire Chief David Campbell during the monument’s unveiling on Thursday, June 28, 1928. The memorial is between Southwest Alder Street and Southwest 18th and 19th avenues. Campbell was killed on June 26, 1911, while fighting a fire at the Union Oil distribution plant. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, June 29, 1928, under the headline “Statue Unveiled to City’s Firemen Dead.” The photograph had the following caption: “Cenotaph’s formal presentation to the city marks exact hour of 17 years ago when Fire Chief David Campbell was buried. This memorial at 19th and Washington streets [sic], is a tribute to him and all firemen who have died in line of duty.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Myrtyred [sic] Chief Honored; Statue to Him Unveiled.”

Unidentified group at fire chiefs’ convention?

Photograph showing a group of unidentified people standing in two rows outside Portland City Hall, possibly at a fire chiefs’ convention. Most of the people in the photograph are wearing suits and ties; some are in uniform. On the building behind them is a banner with an emblem and the words “FIRE CHIEFS WELCOME” on it. See related image No. 371N3058. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Dedication of giant air-mail box at 6th and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing a small crowd at the dedication of a huge air-mail collection box on the corner of what is now Southwest Sixth Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street. Standing in front of the box and holding a large prop key are Dr. L. T. Jones (left), president of the Portland Exchange Club, and John M. Jones, Portland postmaster. The box was set up by the exchange club to collect mail that would be carried east by the Varney air-mail service. The box was equipped with a loudspeaker to broadcast messages about air mail. The dedication took place on September 3, 1929.

Earl Riley, Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at dedication of Waverly Baby Home, Portland

Photograph showing (from left) Earl Riley, Oregon first lady Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at the dedication of the new Waverly Baby Home building in Portland on November 28, 1931. They are standing in front of the building’s cornerstone, which has not yet been placed, and Meier is holding a bouquet of flowers. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3021 were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on November 29, 1931, under the headline “New Home for Babies Dedicated.” This photograph had the following caption: “From left, Earl Riley, city commissioner; Mrs. Julius L. Meier receiving bouquet from L. E. Kern, president of the board of trustees of the Waverly Baby home, and State Treasurer Rufus C. Holman, at the dedication of the new $115,000 home for parentless waifs Saturday. Riley represented the city and Holmes for the state.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the opening of the new building.

Oregon first lady Grace Meier with cornerstone at dedication of Waverly Baby Home, Portland

Photograph showing Oregon first lady Grace Meier posing with a trowel and the cornerstone of the new Waverly Baby Home building at a dedication ceremony on November 28, 1931. Inscribed on the cornerstone are the words “THE BABY HOME / ERECTED 1931.” A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3009 were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on November 29, 1931, under the headline “New Home for Babies Dedicated.” This photograph had the following caption: “Mrs. Meier laying the cornerstone.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the opening of the new building.

Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, Mayor George L. Baker, and three unidentified men at Multnomah Stadium

Photograph of five men standing in a row on the field at Multnomah Civic Stadium during an event. In front of them is an unidentified Portland police officer. The man at left is Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, and the second man from left is Portland Mayor George L. Baker. The other three men are unidentified.

USS Constitution and tugboat sailing under St. Johns Bridge

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and a Shaver Transportation Company tugboat sailing under the St. Johns Bridge in Portland in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 22, 1933, when the frigate departed for Kalama after a visit to Portland as part of a national tour. At far right is the USS Grebe, which accompanied and towed the Constitution on the tour. A story, headlined “Old Frigate Leaves After 21-Day Stay” and two related images, Nos. 371N3705 and 371N3716, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 22, 1933. See related image No. 371N3707. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Veterans protest? at Multnomah Stadium

Photograph of a group of unidentified veterans wearing costumes and posing with a wagon full of hay at Multnomah Civic Stadium in Portland. On the side of the wagon is sign that reads “Voiture 112 / Bellingham Wash.” The photograph may have been taken at a rally or protest related to bonus payments for World War I veterans. The man at center left is holding a sign reading “Andy Mellon’s Bonus,” probably referring to Andrew Mellon, who served as United States treasury secretary.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson holding a bronze plaque commemorating the visit of the frigate USS Constitution to Portland. The photograph was taken during a ceremony aboard the frigate on Thursday, August 10, 1933, in which Carson presented the plaque to the ship’s executive officer, Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (second from right). Several unidentified men are watching Carson; the man at left may be City Commissioner Earl Riley. A story about the presentation, headlined “City Presents Bronze Plaque to ‘Ironsides,’ ” was published in the Oregon Journal the day of the ceremony. See related image Nos. 371N3728 and 371N3729.

Presentation of Oregon state flag to crew of USS Constitution?

Photograph showing two unidentified women and four U. S. Navy officers standing in a row on a ship, holding a flag depicting a beaver. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, at a reception aboard the frigate USS Constitution after the ship arrived in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. In a front-page story on August 3, 1933, the Oregon Journal reported the following about the ceremony: “The outstanding feature of the reception was presentation of the official flag of Oregon to Commander [Henry] Hartley and the ship by the Daughters of 1812. Mrs. George H. Root, president, made the speech of presentation telling how glad the people of Portland were to have the privilege of visiting the great naval shrine and welcoming the officers and men. Miss Esther Allen Jobes, granddaughter of the founding president of the organization, presented the flag to the commander.” Also see image No. 371N0473.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver presenting picture of USS Constitution to Mayor Joseph K. Carson

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson holding up a framed picture depicting the frigate USS Constitution in Portland with the St. Johns Bridge in the background. The photograph was taken at Portland City Hall on August 26, 1933. The Constitution visited Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. Gulliver, commanding officer of the Constitution, returned to Portland while the ship was visiting Longview, Washington, to present the picture of the frigate to the city. The picture was created by artist Duncan Gleason of Hollywood, California.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver? and Marine guard aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing a U. S. Navy officer saluting a Marine guard as they present arms aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph may show the honors marking the return of the Constitution’s commanding officer, Commander Louis J. Gulliver, on August 11, 1933, after a 30-day leave. Gulliver’s return occurred during the Constitution and crew’s three-week visit to Portland as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” Also see image Nos. 371N3713, 371N3718, and 371N3719.

Officers of USS Constitution presenting miniature cannon to Oregon Journal writer Wallace S. Wharton

Photograph showing (from left) Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution; Wallace S. Wharton, a writer for the Oregon Journal; and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer of the Constitution. They are standing in a row aboard the ship, and Gulliver is smiling and holding a tiny wooden cannon. The photograph was taken in August 1933, while the Constitution and crew were in Portland for three weeks as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Wallace S. Wharton (center), staff member of The Journal, receives miniature cannon from old timbers of ship in appreciation of articles written on frigate’s visit. Presentation is made by Commander Gulliver with Lieutenant Commander Hartley looking on approvingly.” Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3724, and 371N3730, which were published with this photograph.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver greeting two unidentified men aboard USS Constitution?

Photograph showing a U. S. Navy officer greeting two unidentified men. The officer is probably Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, and the photograph was probably taken in Portland in August 1933, during a three-week visit by the ship and crew as part of a national tour.

Descendants of Revolutionary War captain William Van Cleve aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Full-length portrait showing six descendants of William Van Cleve posing aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in August 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and a short story were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 10, 1933, under the headline “Ship Visit Unites Family.” The photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Joseph Collins Van Cleve of U. S. S. Constitution brings definite proof to Circuit Judge Clarence H. Gilbert and Dr. Archie Van Cleve of Portland that they are descendants of William Van Cleve, a captain in the Revolutionary war. From left, aboard Old Ironsides, are Judge Gilbert, Dr. Van Cleve, Bertelle Van Cleve, 5; Katherine Gilbert, 20; Joanne Van Cleve, 12; Lieutenant Van Cleve.” According to the accompanying story, Bertelle and Joanne Van Cleve are the daughters of Archie Van Cleve, and Katharine Gilbert (spelled differently in the caption than in the story) is the daughter of Judge Gilbert.

Major George E. Sandy presents U. S. history books for library of USS Constitution

Photograph, taken aboard the frigate USS Constitution, showing Major George E. Sandy (third from left) presenting a two-volume set of James Truslow Adams’ “March of Democracy” for the ship’s library on August 18, 1933. The presentation occurred during the ship’s three-week visit to Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on the day of the presentation. The photograph had the headline “Democracy Marches on ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” It had the following caption: “Presentation of a set of United States history books to the library of the frigate Constitution Friday morning by major George E. Sandy on behalf of Rose City post No. 35, American legion. Left, Boatswain’s Mate First Class Metress; Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding the ship; Major Sandy, presenting the books; Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer, and Marine Sergeant Billett.” The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Frigate Gets History She Helped Make.” The story gave the following explanation about the gift of the books: “When the ship arrived in Portland, it was discovered that the library issued by the bureau of navigation did not have a history of the United States or an English dictionary. Lieutenant David W. Tolson commented on the lack and the embarrassment caused at times when questions on points of history were asked. The comment was overheard by Sandy, who set about to rectify the condition.”

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