Multnomah County (Or.)

1449 Collections results for Multnomah County (Or.)

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Descendants of Revolutionary War captain William Van Cleve aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Full-length portrait showing six descendants of William Van Cleve posing aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in August 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and a short story were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 10, 1933, under the headline “Ship Visit Unites Family.” The photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Joseph Collins Van Cleve of U. S. S. Constitution brings definite proof to Circuit Judge Clarence H. Gilbert and Dr. Archie Van Cleve of Portland that they are descendants of William Van Cleve, a captain in the Revolutionary war. From left, aboard Old Ironsides, are Judge Gilbert, Dr. Van Cleve, Bertelle Van Cleve, 5; Katherine Gilbert, 20; Joanne Van Cleve, 12; Lieutenant Van Cleve.” According to the accompanying story, Bertelle and Joanne Van Cleve are the daughters of Archie Van Cleve, and Katharine Gilbert (spelled differently in the caption than in the story) is the daughter of Judge Gilbert.

Major George E. Sandy presents U. S. history books for library of USS Constitution

Photograph, taken aboard the frigate USS Constitution, showing Major George E. Sandy (third from left) presenting a two-volume set of James Truslow Adams’ “March of Democracy” for the ship’s library on August 18, 1933. The presentation occurred during the ship’s three-week visit to Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on the day of the presentation. The photograph had the headline “Democracy Marches on ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” It had the following caption: “Presentation of a set of United States history books to the library of the frigate Constitution Friday morning by major George E. Sandy on behalf of Rose City post No. 35, American legion. Left, Boatswain’s Mate First Class Metress; Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding the ship; Major Sandy, presenting the books; Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer, and Marine Sergeant Billett.” The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Frigate Gets History She Helped Make.” The story gave the following explanation about the gift of the books: “When the ship arrived in Portland, it was discovered that the library issued by the bureau of navigation did not have a history of the United States or an English dictionary. Lieutenant David W. Tolson commented on the lack and the embarrassment caused at times when questions on points of history were asked. The comment was overheard by Sandy, who set about to rectify the condition.”

Seaman G. B. Howe of USS Constitution and Lieutenant Commander J. C. Ghormley looking at coins from China

Photograph, taken aboard the frigate USS Constitution on August 18, 1933, showing Seaman G. B. Howe and retired Lieutenant Commander J. C. Ghormley looking at coins from China. The photograph was taken during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on the day the picture was taken. The photograph accompanied a story that provided the following information: “Among the several interesting events on board the beloved veteran of the navy [the USS Constitution] at her Swan island berth today was identification of the member of the crew promised a ‘real party’ in Portland by Lieutenant Commander J. Carlos Ghormley, U. S. N. R., when he visited the ship at Washington navy yard December 8, 1932. At that time Dr. Ghormley had two Chinese coins, exactly alike. He gave one to a sailor with instructions to match it with the other on arrival in Portland, and that the sailor would be royally entertained. Boarding the ship this morning Dr. Ghormley matched coins with G. B. Howe, seaman, second class, and royal yardman of the ship. Howe is from Lowell, Mass., and enlisted on board the Constitution. Immediately after identification of the coins permission was granted by Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer, for Howe to go on liberty with Dr. Ghormley.”

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting a plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard the frigate USS Constitution on Thursday, August 10, 1933, during the Constitution’s three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, a cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 5 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Gets Plaque.” The photograph had the following caption: “Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, commanding the frigate Constitution, with a plaque commemorating the visit of the historic ship in Portland harbor. The presentation was made at 10:30 a.m. Thursday on board the ship.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the presentation of the plaque. See related image Nos. 371N3729 and 371N3739.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing three unidentified men watching as Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson presents a bronze plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard the frigate USS Constitution on Thursday, August 10, 1933, during the Constitution’s three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, the Oregon Journal published a story about the presentation and a related photograph, image No. 371N3729. According to the story, the plaque commemorated the ship’s visit to Portland, and Carson was accompanied by “City Commissioners Riley, Bean, and Bennett,” who may be the three unidentified men shown in this photograph. Also see related image No. 371N3739.

Samuel M. Mears looking at rope aboard frigate USS Constitution

Photograph showing Samuel M. Mears holding a loop of thick rope aboard the frigate USS Constitution in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited Portland from August 2 to August 22 as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Samuel M. Mears, president of Portland Cordage company and midshipman on the Constitution in 1871, is an honored visitor. He gave $600 worth of cordage for rerigging the ship.” The photograph of Mears was probably taken earlier, on Friday, August 18, 1933; his visit to the ship is mentioned in a story published on Page 2 of that day’s Oregon Journal. The story, describing activities on the ship on August 18, reported that Mears had lived on the Constitution for nine months as a midshipman in the naval academy. Image note: Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3724, and 371N3736, which were published with the photograph of Mears.

Group at tea during visit of USS Constitution to Portland

Portrait of the commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, members of his family, and others at a tea on Friday, August 18, 1933. The tea was held during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and its crew. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Group at Friday tea, in front row from left are Phylis Drake and Grace Gulliver and in rear row Marion Bass, Commander [Louis J.] Gulliver, Mrs. Gulliver and Marjorie Bass.” Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3730, and 371N3736, which were published with this photograph.

Dedication of marker at site of William Johnson’s cabin, Southwest Macadam Avenue and Curry Street, Portland?

Photograph showing two flag bearers standing on either side of a stone marker, facing to the right. Unidentified people are standing in a row behind them. The photograph was probably taken on August 9, 1933, and depicts the dedication of a marker at the site of the first cabin on the west side of Portland. The dedication ceremony followed a luncheon in honor of officers from the frigate USS Constitution, who were in Portland as part of a national tour by the Constitution and crew. In a story on August 9, 1933, the Oregon Journal gave the following information about the dedication ceremony: “After the luncheon representatives of the patriotic societies went to Southwest Macadam avenue and Curry street, where the marker on the site of the first cabin on Portland’s West side, erected by William Johnson, a veteran of the battle between the Constitution and British frigate Guerriere August 19, 1812, was dedicated by the Daughters of 1812. The dedication program opened with an invocation by Mrs. James H. Huddleson, chaplain of the Daughters of 1812. Members of Boy Scout troop No. 19 formed the patrol and guard of honor for the occasion. Scouts Miln [sic] Gillespie and Donald Kirby were colorbearers, and scout Erwin Lesser was bugler.” The story reported that the ceremony included a talk by Lewis A. McArthur on the history of William Johnson’s career and remarks by Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer of the USS Constitution. The Journal reported that the marker was unveiled by Mary Katherine Keffer, a descendant of Johnson, and that it consisted of “a bronze plaque on a granite stone taken from the lower section of Canyon road.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of USS Constitution

Half-length portrait of Commander Louis J. Gulliver facing front. The photograph was taken in Portland in May 1933, when Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, inspected the moorage at Swan Island prior to a visit by the frigate and crew in August as part of a national tour. With Gulliver were Lieutenant. H. St Johns Butler (background, left), the ship’s navigating officer, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer. A story, headlined “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Chief Praises Moorage Here,” and related image No. 371N3715 were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on May 12, 1933.

Diners at luncheon in honor of officers of USS Constitution, Laurelhurst Park, Portland

Photograph showing people seated at a long table during an outdoor luncheon honoring officers of the frigate USS Constitution on August 9, 1933. The luncheon was held at Laurelhurst Park in Portland. The Constitution and crew visited Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. A story about the luncheon, headlined “Citizens Honor Officers From Old Ironsides,” was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 9, 1933. Also see image No. 371N3723.

Diners at luncheon in honor of officers of USS Constitution, Laurelhurst Park, Portland

Photograph showing people dining at long tables during an outdoor luncheon honoring officers of the frigate USS Constitution on August 9, 1933. The luncheon was held at Laurelhurst Park in Portland. The Constitution and crew visited Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon journal on August 9, 1933, under the headline “Dinner in Park Fetes ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” The photograph had the following caption: “Civic luncheon, preceding dedication of marker to veteran of Constitution, is held under towering firs in Laurelhurst park. At the head table were Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley and Lieutenants D. W. Lyon and W. J. Dean and Dan E Gould, general chairman of program. Descendants of heroic figures of Constitution’s history were introduced.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the luncheon. See related image Nos. 371N3723, also taken at the luncheon, and 371N3725, which may depict the marker dedication referred to in the caption for this photograph.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (second from left), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (right) and unidentified sailors saluting as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after returning from a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken aboard the Constitution on August 11, 1933, while the ship and crew were in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3713 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, left, stepping onto the decks of ‘Old Ironsides,’ with side-boys at salute, and welcomed by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Hartley, who had command of the frigate during Gulliver’s absence on leave. Hartley relinquished command and resumed his duties as executive officer.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Old Ironsides.” The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the honors marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley shaking hands as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken on August 11, 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return, headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Ironsides” was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. See related image Nos. 371N3713 and 371N3719. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Officers aboard USS Constitution during visit to Portland

Full-length portrait of seven officers standing in row and facing front aboard the frigate USS Constitution in August 1933 during a three-week visit by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Officers of the ship (reading from left), Lieutenant David W. Tolson, Lieutenant W. J. Dean (supply corps), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer; Commander Louis J. Gulliver, captain; Lieutenant Joseph C. Van Cleve, Lieutenant J. Y. Dannenberg and Lieutenant D. W. Lyon (medical corps).” Also see image Nos. 371N3724, 371N3730, and 371N3736, which were published with this photograph.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver waving farewell from USS Constitution

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, waving from the top of the gangplank before the ship’s departure from Portland on August 22, 1933, after a three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, a cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3705 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver of the frigate waves farewell to an appreciative and grateful city.” Image note: Light leak on negative.

USS Constitution officers Lieutenant. H. St Johns Butler, Commander Louis J. Gulliver, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley

Three-quarters portrait of three U. S. Navy officers standing in a row and facing front. The photograph was taken in Portland in May 1933. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on May 12, 1933, under the headline “Getting Ready for ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” The photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, center, commanding officer of the gallant old frigate Constitution, inspecting the Swan Island moorage to be occupied by the ship on her arrival here August 2. With the commander are Lieutenant H. St. Johns Butler, navigating officer, left, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer. The photograph accompanied a story headlined “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Chief Praises Moorage Here.” See related image No. 371N3720.

Sailors climbing into position on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing sailors on the USS Constitution climbing ladders toward a platform on the mizzenmast in August 1933. The photograph was taken while the frigate and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. The photograph may have been taken on August 18, 1933, when sailors on the Constitution set sails on the mizzenmast. A similar photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 19, 1933, along with image No. 371N3711 and a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Crowd watching crew members set sails on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing a crowd of spectators watching crew members set sails on the mizzenmast of the USS Constitution on Friday, August 18, 1933. The ship was moored on Swan Island, Portland, during a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, August 19, 1933, under the headline “Constitution Preens Wings.” This photograph had the following caption: “While thousands of Portlanders looked on from the airport and the hill sides, sailors on ‘Old Ironsides’ set sails on the mizzenmast of the old warrior late Friday. Top picture shows the sails unfurled.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver and son looking at cannon aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (right) and his son, Louis J. Gulliver Jr., a midshipman third class, looking at a cannon aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in Portland on August 11, 1933, after Commander Gulliver returned from a 30-day leave and resumed command of the frigate. The ship and crew were in Portland on a three-week visit as part of a national tour. Gulliver’s wife, son, and three daughters accompanied him to Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3719 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Gulliver showing a 1933 model midshipman, his son, Louis J. Jr., what a midshipman of 1812 should know about ordnance.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

USS Constitution and USS Grebe arriving in Portland?

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution (left) and its companion ship, the USS Grebe (right) sailing on the Willamette River between Waud Bluff (background, right) and Swan Island in Portland in August 1933, when the ships and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. The photograph may have been taken on August 2, 1933, the day they arrived.

USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland, in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. A crowd is partially visible in the foreground. This photograph may have been taken on Friday, August 18, 1933, when a large crowd of spectators watched sailors set the sails on the frigate’s mizzenmast. See image No. 371N3712.

USS Constitution and tugboat off Swan Island, Portland

Photograph, taken from shore, showing the frigate USS constitution and an accompanying tugboat under way on the Willamette River in Portland in August 1933. A small group of spectators are watching from the beach. In the background is Swan Island, where the frigate was moored while the ship and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933. The visit was part of a national tour.

USS Constitution under way on Willamette River, leaving Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and an accompanying tugboat on the Willamette River off Waud Bluff as the ship departs Portland on Tuesday, August 22, 1933. The frigate and crew visited Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3716 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal the day the ship departed. The photographs were published under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “The Constitution as she appeared below Columbia university on the way down river shortly after 6 a.m. Tuesday after a 21-day stay here.” Columbia University is now the University of Portland.

USS Constitution and tugboat sailing under St. Johns Bridge

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and a Shaver Transportation Company tugboat sailing under the St. Johns Bridge in Portland in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 22, 1933, when the frigate departed for Kalama after a visit to Portland as part of a national tour. At far right is the USS Grebe, which accompanied and towed the Constitution on the tour. A story, headlined “Old Frigate Leaves After 21-Day Stay” and two related images, Nos. 371N3705 and 371N3716, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 22, 1933. See related image No. 371N5539.

Philip L. Jackson giving address at groundbreaking ceremony for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing Philip L. Jackson delivering an address to the crowd at a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Break Ground for Veterans’ Hospital.” This photograph had the following caption: “Marshall N. Dana, associate editor of The Journal, who was chairman, and Philip L. Jackson, publisher of the Journal, reading his address covering the history of the gift of the site by his father, the late C. S. Jackson, founder of The Journal.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that the groundbreaking had been performed by veteran Cyril G. Manning, whose hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3014, and 371N3016.

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