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Oral History Interview with Bette Lee, by Sandy Polishuk [Transcript]

Transcript. Bette Lee discusses her activism and career in photographing protests, beginning in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1980s, and later in Portland, Oregon. She discusses several specific photographs, many of which can be found in the transcript. Protests and movements discussed include the Portland Alliance, Indie Media, World trade Organization, Iraq War, Occupy Wall Street, Livermore Action Group, etc.

Lee, Bette

Oral History Interview with Bette Lee, by Sandy Polishuk [Sound Recording 02]

Session 2, Part 1. The first 4 minutes of this recording is overlaid with Sound Recording 3. Bette Lee discusses her activism and career in photographing protests, beginning in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1980s, and later in Portland, Oregon. She discusses several specific photographs, many of which can be found in the transcript. Protests and movements discussed include the Portland Alliance, Indie Media, World trade Organization, Iraq War, Occupy Wall Street, Livermore Action Group, etc.

Lee, Bette

Oral history interview with Bernie Foster [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Bernie Foster was conducted by Jan Dilg at The Skanner Newsgroup offices in Portland, Oregon, from August 30 to October 12, 2017. Bernie Foster was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was recorded over three sessions; however, the first part of the first session was not recorded. In the first interview session, conducted on August 30, 2017, Foster discusses the history and daily operation of The Skanner, the Portland-based newspaper he co-founded. He talks about hiring journalists, attempting to expand into radio, and running an online news site. He talks about his involvement with the National Black Publishers Association and some of the stories he published, including on the topic of policing in Portland.

Foster, Bernie (Bernard), 1940-

Oral history interview with LeRoy Haynes, Jr. [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with the Rev. Dr. LeRoy Haynes, Jr., was conducted by Jan Dilg at Haynes' office in Portland, Oregon, from October 8 to December 5, 2018. Haynes was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on October 8, 2018, Haynes discusses his family background and early life in Beaumont, Texas, including his experiences with racism and segregation as a black person. He talks about the black community in Beaumont, his early education, and his early involvement with the Methodist Episcopal Church. He discusses his involvement in the civil rights movement, including his training for and participation in non-violent protests. He then talks about his involvement in the Black Power Movement and the Black Consciousness Movement. He discusses his role in the development of the Black Panther Party; talks about the history of the struggle for freedom for black people; and discusses his experience in college while organizing for civil rights. He talks about his journey in becoming a Methodist Episcopal pastor and briefly discusses his experience at the Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. In the second interview session, conducted on October 29, 2018, Haynes continues discussing his journey in becoming a Methodist Episcopal pastor and his experience at the Perkins School of Theology. He also talks about the history of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. He discusses his career as a pastor in Texas; talks about navigating the conservative attitudes in Dallas to accomplish his goals; and describes his accomplishments. He goes on to speak about his involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance in Portland, Oregon. He discusses his work, in both Oregon and Texas, for programs regarding AIDS and HIV, as well as addiction. He then briefly talks about serving as president of the North Portland Bible College. He discusses his love of education and talks about earning his doctorate of ministry from Brite Theological Seminary and doing post-doctoral work at Boston University. He describes being recruited to serve as pastor of Allen Temple Christian Methodist Episcopal Church in Portland, and as presiding elder of the Alaska and Oregon/Washington Districts and in the Alaska-Pacific Region of the 9th Episcopal District. He shares his first impression of Portland and describes his congregation and the church building. He revisits the topic of his involvement in the Albina Ministerial Alliance and talks about his work toward police reform. In the third interview session, conducted on December 5, 2018, Haynes discusses serving as president of the North Portland Bible College. He talks about his involvement with the Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon and his continued activism. He reflects on the challenges he faced as a civil rights activist, and how he applied the lessons he learned during that time to his community activism in Portland. He also talks about the different forms that racism takes, particularly describing the difference between his experiences in Texas and Oregon. He discusses his book, "God's Prophet in Non-Violence: The Theology and Philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.," and talks about what he hopes readers take from it. He closes the interview by talking about his work with the Allen Temple Christian Methodist Episcopal Church at the time of the interview, awards he's received, and his hopes for the future.

Haynes, LeRoy, Jr., 1949-

Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Joyce Braden Harris was nominated by Oregonians as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Harris discusses her family background and early life with her grandmother in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, and then with her parents and siblings in Madrid, Spain. She discusses her experiences as the only member of her family to speak Spanish and as the only black person in her class. She also describes growing up in Harlem and its community. She discusses her education in New York, including a teacher strike in 1968; starting a black literature class; racism that she, her teachers, and other students faced; and her early activism and leadership roles. She also talks about the Vietnam War, particularly its effect on two of her brothers, who served in the Air Force during that time. She discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including how she chose that school. She also speaks about her and her brothers’ experiences with police. She talks about events that shaped her political outlook, including the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.; her love of mystery novels by black women authors; and people who have influenced her. She discusses some of the awards she has received, her involvement in annual Kwanzaa celebrations, and her work as an educator. In the second interview session, conducted on December 3, 2018, Harris discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, including her efforts to make the curriculum less Eurocentric. She talks about her involvement with Ron Herndon and the black community in Portland; racism she experienced and witnessed; and her involvement with the Black Student Union. She describes the origins of the Black Educational Center, which provided free summer education to black youth and became a full-time private school in 1974. She also talks about continuing her studies at Portland State University. She speaks at length about her work as an educator, including designing lessons for her students, working with parents, and taking her students on field trips to meet public figures. She then discusses working at the Talking Drum bookstore and her involvement in Portland Kwanzaa celebrations. She speaks at length about working with Portland Public Schools to improve the educational environment, particularly for black students. She talks about working with the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory beginning in 1992. She closes the session by discussing her family life. In the third session, conducted on December 12, 2018, Harris discusses the work of the Black United Front towards providing quality, non-racist education. She also talks about her involvement with the BUF. She talks about the presence of police in schools, the rise of charter schools, and organizing black college fairs. She discusses her involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, including the coalition’s efforts toward a federal investigation of police violence in Portland. She also outlines a brief history of police killings of black people in Portland and describes some of the memorials she attended. She then describes organizing a welcoming committee and other volunteer efforts for New Orleans evacuees in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She also shares the story of arranging a funeral for a baby, who was found in a dumpster, and whom she named Baby Precious. She closes the interview by talking about some of the awards and other recognition she has received, and her plans for the future.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris [Sound Recording 03]

Session 3. This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Joyce Braden Harris was nominated by Oregonians as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the third session, conducted on December 12, 2018, Harris discusses the work of the Black United Front towards providing quality, non-racist education. She also talks about her involvement with the BUF. She talks about the presence of police in schools, the rise of charter schools, and organizing black college fairs. She discusses her involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, including the coalition’s efforts toward a federal investigation of police violence in Portland. She also outlines a brief history of police killings of black people in Portland and describes some of the memorials she attended. She then describes organizing a welcoming committee and other volunteer efforts for New Orleans evacuees in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She also shares the story of arranging a funeral for a baby, who was found in a dumpster, and whom she named Baby Precious. She closes the interview by talking about some of the awards and other recognition she has received, and her plans for the future.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Bill Curtin [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1, Part 1. This oral history interview with Bill Curtin was conducted by Greta K. Smith at Curtin’s home in Portland, Oregon, from September 24 to November 16, 2018. Bill Curtin was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in four sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on September 24, 2018, Curtin discusses his family history and early life in the Laurelhurst neighborhood of Portland, including his Irish-Catholic heritage and discrimination his family faced as a result. He speaks at length about his father, Victor Aloysius Curtin, and his father’s career as a police officer in the Portland Police Bureau and involvement with Portland’s black community. He discusses his early interest in joining the Catholic priesthood. He then talks about his education at St. Edward Seminary in Kenmore, Washington, including the changes in the Catholic Church after World War II, some of his professors and fellow students, and his interest in social justice issues. He also talks about community service he did during seminary; shares his memories of Vietnam War protests; and discusses how the issue of birth control affected the church.

Curtin, Bill (William Craib), 1942-

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 01, Number 04

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article about the impending launch of the first ship from the Oregon Shipyard; Story about a war casualty that was a relative of Roy Bennett, a maintenance worker; a feature on the workers of the plate shop at the shipyard; an explanation and chart of ship and facilities construction shifts; an article detailing various construction cranes using dinosaur metaphor; a notice entitled "The Foreman as a Leader"; miscellaneous news items and cartoons; reader suggestions; training announcements; and requests for safety suggestions.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 01, Number 08

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: Cover story "Meriwether Lewis" launched October 19, 1941 about the launching of that ship, designated Hull 170, and Hull 172 the "William Clark" to be launched October 26, 1941; A list of guests and their photos including Gov. Charles A. Sprague, Mayor Earl Riley, Henry L. Corbett, Donald Ross, John H. Burgard, O.V. Badley, Joseph K. Carson, Ralph Dugdale; an article about descendants of Meriwether Lewis who work for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation; a three panel comic about the Lewis and Clark Expedition; information about an employee band and announcement for a hobby show; notes about other hobby groups including roller skating and bowling; a photo spread and article chronicling the construction of the Meriwether Lewis; A segment titled "Human Interest Stuff" which includes safety messages and illustrations, employee submissions, a "Lost and Found" segment and a call for reader submitted photographs; a log of ships launched and the launching program for the Meriwether Lewis; and an advertisement for vocational classes and training.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 01, Number 12

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: A holiday message from Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation to its employees; an article on the launch of the John Hancock and the future launch of the Phillip Livingston; advertisements for defense bonds; safety messages and cartoons; a Christmas message to the armed forces from the employees of Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation; a mock advertisement advocating lynching Japanese people; an article about vocational training; and reader submitted letters.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 02, Number 12

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article about the start of a war bond drive for employees of the Kaiser Shipyard in Vancouver; an article about the new administration building with architectural drawing of the front of the building; announcement of the employees hospital insurance plan; commendation for shipbuilding production records; safety notices; employee "news and views"; photos and an article about the first ship construction starting at the Swan Island Shipyard; bus schedules for the three shifts and a naming contest for the passenger ferries; an article titled "How Liberty Ships are Built" continuing the focus on the plate shop; and employee contributions.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 02, Number 17

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: Article describing production records and awards received by the Oregon Shipyard; Photos and description of air ventilation systems in use around the shipyard; an article about the services and amenities at Hudson House dormitories and Hospital in Vancouver; Employee "News and Views of the Three Shipyards"; a description of expanded ferry transportation service; an brief piece on "Shipyard Slang"; Photographs and descriptions of the assembly and plate shops on Swan Island; a notice from the Red Cross about blood donation; an illustration of "War Fashions for Feminine Safety"; an article titled "How Liberty Ships are Built" focusing on ship keels; employee contributions.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 02, Number 20

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: "After the War, What?" from an address by Henry J. Kaiser; "Mystery Ship" about the secretive construction of ATL Tank Landing Vessel at the Vancouver Shipyard; "K-6 Brings 468 Workers to Vancouver from New York"; An article about the Swan Island dormitories; an article title "Time is Our Only Weapon" urging workers against time wasting; Employee "News and Views of the Three Shipyards"; "How Liberty Ships are Built" featuring bulkhead installations; an article titled "Shipyard Fashion Preview" talking about the reaction of the story "War Fashions for Feminine Safety" and new wardrobe options for female employees; an article titled "Rumor"; an article about the transportation ferries which were acquired from San Francisco area and refurbished to provide transport to and from the shipyards; an short article encouraging carpools; a suggestion card; and other notes to employees.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 02, Number 21

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: "No. 1 Tanker" about the launch of the S.S. Schenectady the first tanker launched from Swan Island Shipyard; A photo essay about the construction of the Schenectady title "Toil, Sweat, and Whiskers"; "Here are the Facts about Gasoline Rationing for shipyard workers"; Lost and found notices, and updated shift schedules at all three shipyards; Employee "News and Views of the three shipyards"; an article titled "Number, Please!" about shipyard switchboard operators; photos from the Welderette's Masquerade Ball; "Keep Fit!" about avoiding illness and dressing appropriately for climate; announcement of a contest to write a song and description of the prizes; "How Liberty Ships are Built" focusing on Frames and Shell Plating; other notes to employees and a chart of Liberty Ship production times over the course of 1942.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 03, Number 05

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: Updates from each shipyard, including additional stress testing at the Swan Island Shipyard in the wake of the "Schenectady" accident; an article encouraging donations to the Red Cross war fund; an article about absenteeism; "The Battle of Supply Lines"; "A Day at the Vancouver Yard" photo series; "News and Views of the Three Shipyards"; "How Liberty Ships are Built" focusing on prefabricated deck houses; a safety quiz.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 03, Number 19

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: Details on the 1943 war loan drive; "Where does a shipyard paycheck go?" a breakdown of how the average shipyard paycheck is distributed; "Victory Fleet Day marks milestone in ship production" describing the occasion, the growth of wartime shipbuilding, and the reduction of production costs; Production updates from each of the three shipyards; "Invasion Show" about the exposition in Portland on September 26, 1943; Updates on the war bond drive, with sales figures, the winner of the popularity contest mentioned in the previous issue Marjorie Zimmerman, as well as contest winners from the other shipyards; "News and Views of the three shipyards"; "What makes burner's torch burn?" describing the sources and function of acetylene and oxygen for the shipyards; "Have you heard the latest about welding?" describing and addressing frequent rumors of the health effects of welding; "While mothers work" describing new child care options for Swan Island ship workers including cost, eligibility, transportation, how to apply, and brief biographies of the directors of the facility Dr. Lois Meek Stoltz and James L. Hymes Jr.; "The Worker Speaks" employee submissions, and article about the introduction of time clocks at the Swan Island shipyard.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 03, Number 23

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: "The Worker Speaks" employee submissions; articles reflecting on the first 300 ships to be launched at Oregon Shipyard; photos of the first week of construction of the first Victory Ship; "10 ways to keep your feet happy"; updates from the Vancouver Shipyard; "New Facilities at Swan Island"; and article titled "Merchant Shipping After the War" from an address by Rear Admiral Emory S. Land, Chairman of the U.S. Maritime Commission; "From Tricycles to Hammerheads" photos of different vehicles around the shipyards; "News and Views of the three shipyards"; Labor Management Committee Idea Award winners; Award of Merit winners; and an article about worker turnover at the shipyards.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 03, Number 24

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: A Christmas message from Henry J. Kaiser taken from remarks made at a religious service in California, summer 1942; "Power Curves in the three yards" with graphs showing power consumption during shifts; an article about the conservation of tires; a photo series on the progress of the first Victory Ship construction; a brief description of the plans to construct combat transports at the Oregon Shipyard; "The Worker Speaks" employee submissions; an article describing the story of the U.S.S. Liscome Bay; description of schedule and payroll adjustments for the week of the christmas holiday; an article about the conversion of tanker ships to navy oil ships; "News and Views of the thee shipyards"; "Radio Serves the 3 Yards" about the KGW-KEX radio station personalities and programming; a health and safety message about pneumonia; and a holiday message.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 05, Number 41

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: A report on a housing survey projecting thirty five thousand home to be built in Portland by 1955; Report of U.S. Maritime Commission opening offices to facilitate sales of surplus goods; Article titled “Prewar Rules Apply to Women, Minors” regarding changes in labor regulations; Articles about the launch of the S.S. Victory Loan; Article about the U.S.S Bexar which was damaged in a fire at the Oregon Shipyard Outfitting dock; report on the U.S.S. Manila Bay; Safety notices; an article titled “The Road to Reconversion” about the shift from wartime industry to peacetime industry.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 05, Number 43

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: A report on the employment numbers for the Oregon Shipyard noting that between 1941 and 1945 190,000 people were employed, only 5000 remained in 1945; article titled “Future Work at Swan Promised by Kaiser”; Article titled “Navy Uses Swan for Veterans”, with photographs; An article about continuation of healthcare benefits for former employees at the Vancouver Shipyard.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 05, Number 48

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article about USS Paul G. Baker, USS Gendreau, and USS Fieberling, three ships involved in the invasion of Okinawa, returning to Swan Island for repairs; an article about the launching of the SS Scott E. Land, Kaiser shipyards’ last wartime launching; an article about Northern Permanente’s potential continuation of medical and hospital plans; an article on the shift from new construction to repair work at Oregon Ship facilities; a photoessay about luxury passenger accommodations added to cargo-passenger ships to compete with air travel; an article on the trial river trips for SS Bent’s Fort; an article about the continuation of wartime health plans; an article about the Oregon Victory Loan Queen candidates; an article on the return of the Portland Christmas parade suspended during the war.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 06, Number 09

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: an article about the construction of a Permanente Workers’ Clinic in Portland; an article about work beginning at Oregon Ship on Alcoa liner hulls; an article about a Kaiser fundraiser for the American Cancer Society; an article about consolidating terminal repair crews to Swan Island; a profile on Permanente hospital doctors, J. C. Woodward and Joseph Kriss; an article about a fire at Vancouver shipyard delaying the delivery of the C-4 cargo ship, S.S. Scott E. Land; an article on the sinking of the Liberty ship, William Dawes.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Volume 06, Number 11

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: an article about launching the rebuilt Dredge Burrard; an article about flooding hampering shipyard activities; an article about upcoming Maritime Day celebrations; an article about a near miss with a floating mine on the return voyage of the U.S.S. Rudyard Bay; an article about the ongoing contract with Alcoa Steamship company; an article on war reserve storage; an article on the Bosn’s Whistle suspending publication.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Oregon Shipyard Edition, Volume 04, Number 06

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipyard covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article on a Kaiser shipyards accident prevention campaign; an article on the Bosn’s Whistle’s need for reporters; an article on problems caused by pranksters; an article on a Children in Wartime conference in Portland; an article on Oregon and Swan Island Shipyards’ Child Service Center suppers; an article on a Multnomah County voter registration drive; an article on Victory gardens; an article on launching the Oregon Shipyard built AP-3 Victory ship, the S. S. Belgium Victory; an article on Friday night shopping in St. Johns; the Worker Speaks column; an article on recreational facilities at the Oregon Shipyard dormitories; an article on cooperation between electrical shipyard workers and metal crafts trades workers to outfit the AP-3 Victory ships and the AP-5 Attack Transports; an article on an Oregon Shipyard swing shift dance; an article on the Oregon Shipyard cafeteria silverware shortage.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Oregon Shipyard Edition, Volume 04, Number 08

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipyard covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article on the Vancouver Shipyard’s construction of a floating drydock; an article on a dance at the Norse Hall in Portland; an article on the availability of Swan Island housing units to non-shipyard workers; an article on the federal income tax deadline; an article on Y. W. C. A. classes; an article on the Oregon state income tax deadline; an article on a Multnomah County voter registration drive; an article on conserving gas; an article on home food service at Kaiser shipyards; an article on the importance of oil tankers; an article on Hi-Y youth shipyard employment; an article on Oregon Shipyard Labor-Management suggestion contest winners; the Worker Speaks column; an article on the launching of the Oregon Shipyard built Victory ship, the S. S. Iran Victory; an article on the Oregon Shipyard Child Service Center graveyard shift services; an article on launching the Oregon Shipyard built Victory ship, the S. S. El Salvador Victory; an article on Oregon Shipyard’s lunch hour programs; the Stubby Bilgebottom comic strip; articles on shipyard job opportunities for veterans; an article on Oregon Shipyard’s superior production performance; an article on an Oregon Shipyard swing shift dance; an article on Jean Willis, the first certified female pipe welder in the Portland-Vancouver area.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Oregon Shipyard Edition, Volume 04, Number 11

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipyard covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article on officer elections of the Portland-Vancouver chapter of the American Welding Society; an article on a monthly benefit dance for the Steam and Marine Fitters’ local 235 at the union’s Portland building; an article on the monthly number of fire calls for the Swan Island Fire department; an article on an important new clam digger’s gun; an article on Portland stores open for evening shopping; an article on the need for Victory garden land near University Homes, Portland; an article on the launching of the Oregon Shipyard built Victory ship, the S. S. Rockland Victory; an article on the Oregon Shipyard April Labor-Management suggestion contest awards; an article on the launching of the Oregon Shipyard built Victory ship, the S. S. Plymouth Victory; an article on a St. Johns Woods community dance; an article on the Oregon Shipyard Child Service center open house; the Stubby Bilgebottom comic strip; articles on the hazards professional gamblers pose for shipyard workers; an article on the benefits of vaccines; the Worker Speaks column.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

The Bo's'n's Whistle, Oregon Shipyard Edition, Volume 04, Number 13

Employee newspaper for Oregon Shipyard covering shipyard productivity and current projects, safety and injury reports, war bond drives, employee sports leagues, award recipients, and human-interest stories. Topical coverage in this issue includes: An article on Vancouver Shipyards’ C-4 Troop Transport contract; an article on Swan Island Shipyard’s contract for an additional thirty-eight T2-SE-A1 oil tankers; an article on the importance of the Kaiser shipyards and on the military’s need for gas and oil tankers; an article on fire prevention at the Kaiser shipyards; an article on vacation regulations; the Stubby Bilgebottom comic strip; the Worker Speaks column; an article on an Oregon Shipyard manual on women counselors; an article on services provided by the Oregon Shipyard Personnel Department; an article on Oregon Shipyard’s reduction in man-hours in Victory ship production; an article on a new Oregon Shipyard warehouse that provided more space for several units, including contractors such as A. J. Bartells Asbestos company; an article on the importance of victory gardens; an article on the importance of May ballot measures for postwar employment; an article on the launching of Oregon Shipyard built Victory ships, the S. S. Rockland Victory and the S. S. Claremont Victory; the Stubby and His Friends column.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

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