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William L. Finley Papers, 1899-1946 Multnomah County (Or.) With digital objects
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Willamette River distress

Manuscript that recollects when Governor Clarence D. Martin called out Portland's mayor at the time, Mayor Carson, on the pollution being dumped into the Willamette River. The document goes on to point out how this is a violation of state law. Portland was not the only area affected.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Wild or band-tailed pigeons

Manuscript that looks over a few previous records of wild pigeons provided by O. G. Delaba and W. B. Jennings. There is a note in parentheses asking to report any spottings of the birds to Finley or Averill. The author reflects that the number of pigeons has declined dramatically.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

White heron search

Manuscript describing the same trip in "Malheur". The focus in this document is on the quest for white herons.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Waterfowl protection and other manuscripts

Manuscript that is composed of various manuscripts, with a focus on closing the waterfowl hunting season. The manuscripts concerning the waterfowl include creating legislation to close or limit the hunting season, the practice of baiting, and protecting waterfowl populations. A manuscript discussing russet-backed thrushes is included.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The witches' garden

Manuscript for a Pacific Monthly article (March 1906) in which William Finley describes his observations of a family of yellowthroats. He discusses the thrill of the hunt when it comes to capturing images of birds.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The witches' garden

An additional draft of "The witches' garden." The manuscript differs from "Yellow throat" with handwritten edits.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The pitcher plant traps and eats insects

A group of people, two who were residents of Gold Beach, went in search of deer. The group included Edgar Averill, John Yeon, Mr. and Mrs. Miller, along with the author. While the group did not find any deer in that outing, they did find a carnivorous plant and took a specimen home. The author goes on to describes how the plant gets nourishment and how it received its scientific name.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The gentle wood-pussy

Manuscript describing a skunk and insisting that they receive undue negativity. The author insists the animals are friendly and are not looking for trouble. The author also comments on the two types of skunks most commonly found in Oregon.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

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