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Portland (Or.) Floods--Oregon--Vanport
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Steel Bridge, Vanport Flood

Photograph of the Steel Bridge over the flooded water of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. The high water has reached the bottom of the bridge. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 30, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Hawthorne Bridge, Vanport Flood

Photograph of the Hawthorne Bridge over the flooded water of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. The draw bridge is up and a boat passes underneath. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 30, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Train on Steel Bridge, Vanport Flood

Photograph of a train crossing the Steel Bridge over the flooded water of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. The high water touches the bottom of the bridge. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 30, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Burnside Bridge, Vanport Flood

Photograph of the Burnside Bridge over the flooded water of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 30, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Swing Bridge in Portland During Vanport Flood

Photograph of a swing bridge, possibly the Morrison Bridge, turned on its axis above the high water of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 30, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Hawthorne Bridge, Vanport Flood

Photograph of the Hawthorne Bridge over the flooded water of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 30, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Locomotive and Union Station in Flood Water, Vanport Flood

Photograph of a steam locomotive in flood water just outside Union Station in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. Widespread flooding is visible in the area around Union Station. A long line of sandbags is visible on the left. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Widespread Flooding on the Willamette River, Vanport Flood

Photograph of widespread flooding on the Willamette River during the Vanport Flood. Taken from the east side of the river, there is a submerged railroad in the foreground. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Sandbags around Union Station during the Vanport flood

A photograph of a line of sandbags holding back flood waters in downtown Portland, Oregon. Union Station and the railroad yards are visible submerged in floodwater in the background. Several unidentified men are working to help reinforce the sandbag wall at various point. The back of the image is stamped with, "Camera Art Studio 4706 N. E. Glisan VE, 3866 Portland, 13, Oregon. 3810 23."

Camera Art Studio (Portland, Or.)

Flood waters at Union Station during the Vanport flood

A postcard of rising flood water around Union Station during the Vanport flood. Several unidentified people working to fill sandbags are visible at the front of the building. A crowd of onlookers observe the flood waters from the railing of the Steel Bridge. The image caption reads, "Flood Waters Union Station " Portland, Ore. Christian V-12."

Willamette River, Vanport Flood

Photograph of a flooded area of the Willamette River in an industrial area of Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. Taken from the east side of the river. There are several ships docked in the Willamette. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Railroad Cars, Vanport Flood

Photograph of long lines of railroad cars in the flood water of the Vanport Flood. The railroads are underwater. Taken from the east side of the Willamette River, with the west hills of Portland, Oregon visible in the background. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Sandbags around Union Station during the Vanport flood

A photograph of a line of sandbags holding back flood waters in downtown Portland, Oregon. Union Station and the railroad yards are visible submerged in floodwater in the background. Several unidentified men are working to help reinforce the sandbag wall at various point. The back of the image is stamped with, "Camera Art Studio 4706 N. E. Glisan VE, 3866 Portland, 13, Oregon. 3810 25."

Camera Art Studio (Portland, Or.)

Willamette River, Vanport Flood

Photograph of a flooded area of the Willamette River during the Vanport Flood. In the foreground, a train is surrounded by water as the railroad is flooded. Taken from the east side of the river. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Portland, Vanport Flood

Photograph of flooded NW Front Street in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. Taken from the Steel Bridge, Union Station and the Broadway Bridge are both visible in the background. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Widespread Flooding on the Willamette River, Vanport Flood

Photograph of widespread flooding on the Willamette River during the Vanport Flood. Taken from the east side of the river, several ships can be seen floating in the high water. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Flood waters at Union Station during the Vanport flood

A postcard depicting the flood water around Union Station during the Vanport flood. The photograph is taken from a high vantage point and shows the water surrounding union station, the railroad yards, and nearby buildings. The Steel Bridge is also visible in the distance. The image caption reads, "Flood waters " Portland, Ore. Christian V 15."

Christian (Photographer)

Widespread Flooding on the Willamette River, Vanport Flood

Photograph of widespread flooding on the Willamette River during the Vanport Flood. Taken from the east side of the river, several ships can be seen floating in the river. Handwritten note on back indicates this was taken May 31, 1948. Taken by an unidentified student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Vanport Flood photographs

Photographs of the damage caused by the Vanport Flood in May 1948 taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, Oregon.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Flood at Night, Vanport Flood

Nightime photograph of a flooded area of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood. Union Station and the Broadway Bridge are both visible. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jerry," indicating this was likely taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome when he was a student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Flooding at Union Station, Vanport Flood

Photograph of flooding at Union Station in Portland, Oregon during the Vanport Flood, 1948. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jerry," indicating this was likely taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome when he was a student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Jerry Jiro Yasutome photographs

  • Org. Lot 762
  • Collection
  • 1945-1948

This collection consists of photographs of the Yasutome family, a Japanese-American family from Portland, Oregon, taken from 1945 to 1948. Most of the photographs were taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome; a smaller number were created by other members of the Yasutome family and by unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, where Jerry Yasutome studied from approximately 1946 to 1948. Photographs taken by Jerry Yasutome and other family members document their experiences during incarceration at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California from 1945 to 1946. These images include portraits of the Yasutome family, including Jerry Yasutome’s son, James Mamoru Yasutome, and his parents, Sadao Kurata Yasutome and Ju Jiro Yasutome; group portraits of electrical workers and a Buddhist Sunday School; and photos of a fire at the Tule Lake high school. The remainder of the photographs in the collection represent the work of students at the Northwest School of Photography. They include photographs of the processing lab and students in classes, as well as portraits taken by the students. Also included are photographs taken by Yasutome and other students depicting the aftermath of the Vanport Flood in May 1948.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Flood Control in Portland, Vanport Flood

Photograph of people spreading dirt on top of sandbags on the west bank of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon to control flooding during the Vanport Flood. Union Station and the Steel Bridge are visible in the background. Handwritten note on back reads, "Jerry," indicating this was likely taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome when he was a student at the Northwest School of Photography.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd

This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

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