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American Legion group posing with airplane in The Dalles

Full-length portrait of a group of people standing in front of a biplane in a field. Several are wearing American Legion garrison caps. The fourth person from left, wearing a dark jacket and holding a hat, is Charles H. Martin; the others are unidentified. Written on the negative is text that could be either “S. O. at The Dalles” or “S. A. at The Dalles.” See related image No. 372A1105.

Unidentified man fueling monoplane at Swan Island airport, Portland

Photograph showing an unidentified man standing on top of a monoplane and holding a fuel hose leading from a Signal tanker truck at right. A second unidentified man is standing next to the open rear doors of the truck and resting one hand on the hose. The photograph was taken at Swan Island airport in Portland. See related image Nos. 372A1311 and 372A1312. Image note: Light leak on negative.

American Legion group posing with airplane in The Dalles

Full-length portrait of six men standing in front of a biplane in a field. Several of the men are wearing American Legion garrison caps. The second man from left is Charles H. Martin; the other men are unidentified. Written on the negative is text that could be either “S. O. at the Dalles” or “S. A. at the Dalles.” See related image No. 372A1106.

Pangborn and Herndon’s plane after landing near Wenatchee, Washington

Photograph of an airplane with a bent propeller lying on the ground. The text “Herndon-Pangborn” is painted on the side of the plane just below the cockpit. The photograph was taken after aviators Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon Jr. completed the first non-stop flight across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States on October 5, 1931. They won a $25,000 prize offered by the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun. Pangborn and Herndon landed their plane, Miss Veedol, on its belly at the airfield in Wenatchee, Washington, without landing gear. They had dumped the landing gear shortly after takeoff to reduce weight.

Pangborn and Herndon’s plane after landing near Wenatchee, Washington

Photograph of unidentified people gathered near an airplane lying on the ground, leaning on one wing. The name “Miss Veedol” is painted on the side of the plane. The photograph was taken after aviators Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon Jr. completed the first non-stop flight across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States on October 5, 1931. They won a $25,000 prize offered by the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun. Pangborn and Herndon landed the Miss Veedol on its belly at the airfield in Wenatchee, Washington, without landing gear. They had dumped the landing gear shortly after takeoff to reduce weight.

Pangborn and Herndon’s plane after landing near Wenatchee, Washington

Photograph of unidentified people gathered near an airplane lying on the ground, leaning on one wing. The name “Miss Veedol” is painted on the side of the plane. The photograph was taken after aviators Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon Jr. completed the first non-stop flight across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States on October 5, 1931. They won a $25,000 prize offered by the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun. Pangborn and Herndon landed the Miss Veedol on its belly at the airfield in Wenatchee, Washington, without landing gear. They had dumped the landing gear shortly after takeoff to reduce weight.

Boeing F4B Navy fighter at Swan Island airport in Portland

Photograph of a Boeing F4B biplane, probably an F4B-4, at Swan Island airport in Portland. On the side of the plane is the word “Anacostia,” indicating the plane was based at Anacostia Naval Air Station near Washington, D. C. Two words of text are handwritten at the bottom of the negative. The first word begins with “H” but the rest of the word is unclear. The second word is “Plane.” The text is visible at the bottom right corner of the image.

Lockheed 5C Vega, the Winnie Mae

Photograph, taken from the side, of a parked Lockheed Vega 5C monoplane, the Winnie Mae. The words “F. C. Hall” and “Around the World Flight” are visible on the plane’s fuselage, just behind the wheel. Near the tail are the words “Winnie Mae” and “Oklahoma.” This is probably the plane that pilot Wiley Post flew on two record-setting flights around the world in 1931 and 1933. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Unidentified man with Rankin brothers’ airplane On-to-Oregon

Photograph showing an unidentified man standing next to a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-to-Oregon, possibly at Rankin airfield in Portland. On the side of the plane are its name and artwork by A. G. Weber depicting oxen and a covered wagon. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930, when pilot Tex Rankin and his brothers, Dick Rankin and Dud Rankin, flew the plane in four unsuccessful attempts to set a record for endurance flying. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Dick Rankin? waving from refueling compartment of airplane On-to-Oregon

Photograph showing a man, probably pilot Dick Rankin, standing in the refueling compartment of a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-to-Oregon. He is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles, looking upward, and waving. The photograph may have been taken at the Rankin airfield in Portland, probably in August 1930. That month, Rankin and his brothers, Tex Rankin and Dud Rankin, flew the On-to-Oregon in four attempts, all unsuccessful, to set an endurance flying record. According to an August 10, 1930, Oregon Journal article about preparations for the first attempt, a hole was cut in the top of the plane’s fuselage to accommodate aerial refueling. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, and 371N6233.

Crowd around Rankin brothers’ airplane On-to-Oregon

Photograph showing a crowd gathered around a Stinson Detroiter monoplane named On-to-Oregon, possibly at Rankin airfield in Portland. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930, when pilot Tex Rankin and his brothers, Dick Rankin and Dud Rankin, flew the plane in four unsuccessful attempts to set a record for endurance flying. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

Shell Oil plane dropping refueling hose to Rankin brothers’ On-to-Oregon

Aerial photograph showing a Shell Oil plane and a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-to-Oregon, in position for midair refueling, probably above the Portland area. The end of the refueling hose is visible just above the On-to-Oregon. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930, when brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin made four attempts, all unsuccessful, to set an endurance flying record in the On-to-Oregon. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234. Image note: Negative damage visible in image.

On-to-Oregon takes off in Rankin brothers’ attempt at endurance record

Photograph showing a Stinson monoplane, the On-to-Oregon, taking off. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930 at Rankin airfield in Portland during one of four attempts that month by brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin to set an endurance flying record. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.Photograph showing two men standing outdoors next to an airplane, the On-to-Oregon, possibly at Rankin field in Portland. The man on the right is pilot Dick Rankin. The man on the left is unidentified. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930, when Rankin and his brothers, Tex Rankin and Dick Rankin, flew the On-to-Oregon in four unsuccessful attempts to set an endurance flying record. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, and 371N6234.

On-to-Oregon takes off in Rankin brothers’ attempt at endurance record

Photograph showing a Stinson monoplane, the On-to-Oregon, taking off. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930 at Rankin airfield in Portland during one of four attempts that month by brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin set an endurance flying record. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

Unidentified man with Bidwell-Yale Air Service plane

Full-length portrait of an unidentified man standing next to a monoplane. He is facing front and looking to the right. He has one elbow on the plane’s nose and the other hand in his pocket. He is wearing a jacket, breeches, and boots. On the side of the plane are the words “Bidwell-Yale Air Service.” See related image No. 374N0274.

Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, team of Plane 23, Ford National Reliability Air Tour

Portrait of three men, Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, in front of an airplane. They were the team of Plane 23, a Lockheed monoplane, on the 1928 Ford National Reliability Air Tour. The tour reached Portland on July 16, 1928, and the Plane 23 team was the first to arrive at the Swan Island airport. Schoenhair was the pilot and Cooper was the mechanic. The text “Cooper — Shoenhair [sic] — Ray Acre” and the number 8 are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image.

Pilot Faye Carter with airplane “Queen of the Cascades”

Full-length portrait of a young woman, pilot Faye Carter, standing in front of an airplane with one hand on the propeller. She is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles, a calf-length jacket, and a jumpsuit. On the side of the plane, just below the cockpit window, are the words “ ‘Queen of the Cascades.’ “ A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 7 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928, under the headline “Flies Alone.” The photograph had the caption “Miss Faye Carter,” and accompanied a story titled “Girl Makes Her First ‘Solo Hop.’ “ The story reported that Carter, 22, a student at the Rankin School of Flying in Portland, had made her first solo flight on the morning of April 25 over Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington.

Crowd and mail plane at Swan Island?

Photograph of a crowd gathered around a Pacific Air Transport biplane near a hangar, possibly at Swan Island airport in Portland. An unidentified person is climbing onto the plane’s wing. The words “U. S. Mail” and the number “C 5390” are visible on the plane’s tail. In the background is a second airplane. A mark that may be the number 1 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image. This photograph may be related to image No. 371N5954.

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