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Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a Varney Air Lines mail plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. On December 1, 1929, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the crash, headlined “Mail Pilot Rams Span; Badly Hurt.” A similar photo, image No. 371N3109, was published on Page 2 that day. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the [Interstate] bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day.

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, December 1, 1929, under the headline “Fog Claims Another Plane Victim.” The photograph had the following caption: “Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane which spun to the ground at Vancouver Saturday afternoon after nicking the north tower of the Interstate bridge.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the crash. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day, December 1, 1929. Also see image No. 371N3106.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of unidentified people looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a similar photograph, image No. 371N3105, and a story about the crash, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.” Along with the story, the Journal published image No. 371N3105, a different photograph of the wrecked plane.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of two unidentified boys looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.” Along with the story, the Journal published image No. 371N3105, a different photograph of the wrecked plane.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of unidentified people looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a similar photograph, image No. 371N3105, and a story about the crash, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of an unidentified man looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel, was killed. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, May 27, 1931, under the headline “To Death on West Hills Golf Course.” The photograph had the following caption: “Battered wreckage of the light plane in which Roy H. Sheffel [sic], operator of the Rendezvous eating place, made a fatal plunge to the seventh fairway of the West Hills golf course Tuesday afternoon. The picture was taken after the ship had been righted.” The photograph accompanied a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of airplane near East Glisan Street

Photograph of a group of people gathered around the wreckage of an airplane in a field. Trees and a fence line are visible in the background. The text “Varney Wreck — near E Glisan St” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. “Varney” may refer to Varney Air Lines.

Wreckage of airplane near East Glisan Street

Photograph of a group of people with the wreckage of an airplane in a field. Some of the people are leaning or sitting on the remains of the plane. The text “Varney Wreck — near E Glisan St” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. “Varney” may refer to Varney Air Lines.

Western Air inauguration at Portland Airport

A woman hands two Western Air employees a gift, celebrating the arrival of Western Air Lines in Portland. The two employees, wearing flight attendant uniforms, stand on a set of stairs next to a plane (negative 2 of 6).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Unidentified men with airplane hitched to tow truck at A. L. Campbell Auto Towing, Portland

Photograph showing several unidentified men looking at a parked tow truck outside A. L. Campbell Auto Towing in Portland. Hitched to the back of the truck is an airplane. The plane’s propeller is tied to the boom of the truck, and its back end of its fuselage is resting on two wheels. The plane’s wings are lashed to the top of the fuselage. The second man from left is wearing a coat with the text “G. G. Gerber” on the back.

Unidentified man with Rankin brothers’ airplane On-to-Oregon

Photograph showing an unidentified man standing next to a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-to-Oregon, possibly at Rankin airfield in Portland. On the side of the plane are its name and artwork by A. G. Weber depicting oxen and a covered wagon. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930, when pilot Tex Rankin and his brothers, Dick Rankin and Dud Rankin, flew the plane in four unsuccessful attempts to set a record for endurance flying. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Unidentified man fueling monoplane at Swan Island airport, Portland

Photograph showing an unidentified man standing on top of a monoplane and holding a fuel hose leading from a Signal tanker truck at right. A second unidentified man is standing next to the open rear doors of the truck and resting one hand on the hose. The photograph was taken at Swan Island airport in Portland. See related image Nos. 372A1311 and 372A1312. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Two boys sit in airplane at Portland International Airport

Two boys sit in an airplane while on a field trip at the Portland International Airport. They are students at the Dayton Summer School in Dayton, Oregon. The boy on the left wears a name tag that reads, "John Roblez, Dayton School, Dayton Oregon." The boy on the right smiles at the camera. Photographs from this series were published in the Valley Migrant League's Opportunity News on August 27, 1965.

Three men, one in Santa suit, with airplane

Photograph of two unidentified men, one of them dressed as Santa Claus, standing on the wing of a plane at the Swan Island airport in Portland. A third unidentified man is standing on the ground next to the wing and is reaching up to shake hands with the man in the Santa suit.

Tex Rankin's demonstration of the Ercoupe to Mayor Earl Riley

Pilot Tex Rankin and Portland Mayor Earl Riley, flying in an Ercoupe airplane over Portland and the Columbia River. Taken from another airplane, Mount Adams can be seen in the distance. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Sunday, April 28, 1946 (negative 2 of 6).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Tex Rankin with biplane, Rose O’Portland

Portrait of pilot Tex Rankin standing next to the rose painted on the nose of an airplane named the Rose O’ Portland. Rankin flew the plane in an air race from New York to Los Angeles in September 1928. This photo may have been taken on August 24, 1928, before his departure. See image Nos. 371N2073, 371N5919, 371N5920, 371N6220, and 371N6222. Image note: The number 3 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image.

Spectators at air circus, Swan Island, Portland

Photograph of a crowd outdoors behind a cordon. The photograph was probably taken on Sunday, June 10, 1928, at Swan Island airport during Portland’s second annual air circus. Behind the crowd is an airplane with the words “Standard of California” on the side. The plane, a tri-motor Ford-Stout owned by the Standard Oil Company, was on exhibit at Swan Island during the air show, according to a story about the event on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on June 11, 1928. The Journal reported that more than 6,000 people attended the air show, which included stunts, races, parachuting, and a double wedding on a plane. See related image Nos. 371N1902, 371N2516, and 371N2520. Image note: The number 9 is written on the negative and is faintly visible in the lower right corner of the image.

Shell Oil plane dropping refueling hose to Rankin brothers’ On-to-Oregon

Aerial photograph showing a Shell Oil plane and a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-to-Oregon, in position for midair refueling, probably above the Portland area. The end of the refueling hose is visible just above the On-to-Oregon. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930, when brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin made four attempts, all unsuccessful, to set an endurance flying record in the On-to-Oregon. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234. Image note: Negative damage visible in image.

Russian flyers at Vancouver after flight over North Pole

Men and women stand around an airplane, which is parked on a grassy field. They are grouped towards the right side of the frame, where a man in a long coat and hat holds a box (negative 1 of 16). On sleeve: Pilot - Valery Chkalov (killed later in a test plane crash); Co-pilot - Georgy Bayduko; Navigator - Alexander Belyakov

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Russian airplane at Pearson Field, Vancouver, Washington

Photograph showing a side view of a Russian airplane, Land of the Soviets, at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington. Spectators are visible in the background. The plane and crew were on a trip from Moscow to New York. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, October 19, 1928, the day the picture was taken. The photograph was published under the headline “ ‘Ship’ Takes Off For Another Hop on World Flight.” It had the following caption: “ ‘The Land of the Soviets,’ huge airplane that spent the night at Pearson Field, Vancouver barracks, after being forced down by mechanical trouble en route from Seattle to San Francisco, hopped off again at 8:45 this morning, and at 11:28 was reported over Medford on its way to the Bay cities.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the plane and crew, as well as a second story on Page 2, titled “Russian Sees Airplane Lane Over Pacific.” The Journal listed the people aboard the plane as: pilot Commander S. A. Shestakov; pilot Philip E. Bolotov; navigator Boris E. Sterligov; mechanic Dmitry A. Fufaev; and Andrew W. Petroff, vice president of the Amtorg Trading corporation, which sponsored the flight. See related image Nos. 371N5537, 371N6031, 371N6031A, and 371N6158. Image note: Negative damage at upper left.

Russian airplane at Pearson Field, Vancouver, Washington

Photograph showing a side view of a Russian airplane, Land of the Soviets, at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, October 19, 1928. On the side of the plane is the number URSS-300. The plane developed mechanical trouble shortly after reaching Portland on Friday, October 18, 1928, during a trip from Moscow to New York. The crew landed it at Pearson Field for repairs and resumed the trip the next morning. In a story about the plane and crew published in the October 19 edition, the Oregon Journal listed the people aboard the plane as: pilot Commander S. A. Shestakov; pilot Philip E. Bolotov; navigator Boris E. Sterligov; mechanic Dmitry A. Fufaev; and Andrew W. Petroff, vice president of the Amtorg Trading corporation, which sponsored the flight. See related image Nos. 371N5537, 371N6030, 371N6031A, and 371N6158.

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