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Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-2022

United States Postal Service rally in Portland, Oregon

Activists marching under the Chinatown Gateway in Portland, Oregon, during a rally against proposed cuts to the United States Postal Service in 2013. Two people at the front hold a banner which reads, "Save America's Postal Service." A man wearing a blue jacket and holding a megaphone marches beside them. Another man obscured at the edge of the photograph waves a large American flag in front of the crowd. Several other people in the crowd also hold banners and picket signs.

Young, David

May Day rally march through downtown Portland, Oregon

Activists marching down a street in support of labor rights and immigration reform during a May Day rally in downtown Portland, Oregon on May 1, 2011. Several people hold banners, picket signs, and American flags. A silver police car with its lights flashing and a police officer on a bicycle move down a street in front of the crowd.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Participants in a Health Care for All march in Portland, Oregon

A group of participants in a Health Care for All march held in Portland, Oregon in 2009. At the center of the group is a large puppet dressed as a nurse. There is a round badge reading "Single Payer" pinned to the puppet's chest. Several people in the crowd hold banners and picket signs supporting Jobs with Justice, healthcare reform, and local unions.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Anti-WTO rally marchers in Portland, Oregon

A group of people march down a street in Portland, Oregon during an anti-WTO rally in 2009. A banner at the front of the group reads, "No to the WTO, Yes to the Right to Organize." Several other people in the crowd also hold banners and picket signs supporting Jobs with Justice, labor rights, and fair trade.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Laurie King speaking at an Economic Town Hall

Laurie King speaking to an audience at the First Unitarian Church in Portland, Oregon, during an Economic Town Hall sponsored by Portland Jobs with Justice. The photograph is taken from behind King's back looking out at the audience as she stands at a podium.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Speakers at a CBLOC rally

A man speaks into a microphone at a podium set up outdoors during a rally for the Cross Border Labor Organizing Coalition (CBLOC) in 2005. Behind him, two men stand on a bench holding up a sign which reads, "CAFTA: Worse than NAFTA."

Portland Jobs with Justice

Margaret Butler holding a Jobs with Justice pledge card

Margaret Butler, Portland Jobs with Justice executive director, during a District Council of Trade Unions rally at Portland City Hall. She is standing at a microphone in front of a crowd of people holding a Jobs with Justice pledge card above her head. A large group of people stand behind her holding pro-union banners and picket signs.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Portland Jobs with Justice rally outside Powell's Books

A crowd of people attending a rally in support of Powell's employees during their campaign for a union contract with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU). People are gathered on the sidewalk in front of the entrance to Powell's Books in Portland, Oregon. A large paper mache puppet of Michael Powell is visible on the right side of the photograph. During the rally, Portland Jobs with Justice and Portland Art and Revolution members acted out a performative wedding between Powell's owner, Michael Powell and ILWU's Larry Longshore.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Puppets at a Portland Jobs with Justice rally at Powell's Books

Three people help move a large puppet down a street in Portland, Oregon. The puppet wears a formal suit and has a gold name tag reading, "Michael Powell, Owner." A second puppet visible behind the first puppet is of a man with a full beard and blue hat wearing a wedding dress. It has a nametag decorated in flowers which reads, "Larry Longshore, Union Worker." The puppets are part of a rally coordinated by Portland Jobs with Justice to support Powell's employees during their campaign for a union contract with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU). During the rally, Portland Jobs with Justice and Portland Art and Revolution members acted out a performative wedding between Powell's owner, Michael Powell and ILWU's Larry Longshore.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Workers' Rights Board panel

Participants in the first Workers' Rights Board organized by Portland Jobs with Justice. JwJ organized the hearing to support Powell's employees during bargaining for the first union contract in 2000. Participants are seated in a row behind two long tables. A banner reading, "Workers' Rights Board," hangs on the wall behind them. Name cards on the table identify the panel participants as José Padín, Mary King, Diane Rosenbaum, and Aryeh Hirschfield.

Portland Jobs with Justice

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded. In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California. In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon. In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University). In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

Oral history interview with Robert F. Smith [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Robert F. Smith was conducted by Clark Hansen at Smith’s office in Medford, Oregon, from August 30 to September 1, 1995. In this interview, Smith discusses his family background and early life in Burns, Oregon. He talks about his interest in basketball while attending Willamette University. He also talks about running a ranch and multiple other businesses after graduation; his flying hobby; and his involvement with a number of civic organizations. He goes on to talk about being recruited to run for the Oregon Legislature by members of the Oregon Republican Party, and his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1960 to 1973. He discusses his campaigns, committees, fellow legislators, and legislation that he worked on. He talks about Tony Yturri, Monte Montgomery, Bill Holmstrom, Stan Ouderkirk, Clarence Barton, and Stafford Hansell. He discusses legislation on agriculture, taxes, labor, forestry and land-use. He also talks about how his leadership style as speaker of the House from 1969 to 1973, and about his legislative agenda. He closes the interview by discussing the social life of legislators.

Smith, Robert F. (Robert Freeman), 1931-

Oral history interview with Connie McCready [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with Connie McCready was conducted by Clark Hansen at McCready’s home in Portland, Oregon, from March 21 to July 5, 1994. In this interview, McCready discusses her family background and early life in Portland. She also discusses her early career in journalism working for the Coos Bay Times and the Oregonian; and starting a family with her husband, Oregonian reporter Albert L. McCready. She discusses her involvement with the Republican Party, campaigning, her liberal politics, and her experience as a woman in the Oregon Legislature during the 1967 and 1969 sessions. McCready also discusses legislation she worked on, including taxes, fair employment, public transportation and TriMet, and her work on behalf of sternwheelers. McCready talks about some of the legislators she worked with, including Tom Mahoney, Bob Packwood, Stafford Hansell, and Jason Boe. She then discusses her time in the Portland City Council from 1970 to 1979, including the Mount Hood Freeway vote; the bureaus she ran, including fire, cable, and public works; her support for gay rights; and receiving death threats. She discusses the city commissioners and mayors she worked with, including Frank Ivancie, Neil Goldschmidt, Terry Schrunk, and Mildred Schwab. She also discusses her campaign against John Lorenz in 1976, and Portland's sister-city relationship with Sapporo, Japan.

McCready, Connie (Constance), 1921-2000

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church. McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church. McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church. McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church. McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis [Sound Recording 10]

Tape 5, Side 2. This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church. McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis [Sound Recording 11]

Tape 6, Side 1. This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church. McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church. McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

McGinnis, Lynette K. (Lynette Kerr), 1894-1993

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