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Oregon Journal car on Cloud Cap Road with view of Mount Hood

Photograph showing the view of Mount Hood from the newly completed Cloud Cap Road, on the mountain’s north side, in October 1926. An unidentified person is standing next to a parked Oregon Journal car and looking at the view. On October 6, 1926, the Oregon Journal published three related photographs and a front-page story about the completion of the road, headlined “Cloud Cap Road Finished; Fine View Unfolded.” The story reported that the 10-mile-long road, ending at the Cloud Cap Inn, would officially be known as the Cooper spur of the Mount Hood Loop Highway. Construction of the road had begun in 1925. See related image Nos. 374N0471, 374N0472, 374N0502, 374N0519, 374N0521, 374N0522, 374N0523, 374N0524, 374N0526, and 374N0527.

Crew refueling pilot Frank M. Hawks’ airplane in Portland

Photograph of two men refueling Captain Frank M. Hawks’ plane as Hawks speaks with an unidentified man at Swan Island airport in Portland on Saturday, January 23, 1932. Hawks made two brief fuel stops in Portland that day while flying from Agua Caliente, Mexico to Vancouver, British Columbia, and back in a successful attempt to set a speed record. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N1082 and 371N4991, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 24, 1932. The photographs were published under the headline “Speed King Refuels Here on Flight.” This photograph had the following caption: “Attendants at the airport refueling the ship while Hawks chatted with bystanders for a few minutes.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Hawks Sets Record for 2-Way Dash.” According to the story, Hawks set a round-trip speed record of 13 hours, 43 minutes, 59 seconds.

Crew refueling pilot Frank M. Hawks’ airplane in Portland

Photograph of a crowd watching as two men refuel Captain Frank M. Hawks’ plane at Swan Island airport in Portland on Saturday, January 23, 1932. Hawks is standing in the cockpit. He made two brief fuel stops in Portland that day while flying from Agua Caliente, Mexico to Vancouver, British Columbia, and back in a successful attempt to set a speed record. On Sunday, January 24, 1932, the Oregon Journal published a story about Hawks’ flight on Page 1, under the headline “Hawks Sets Record for 2-Way Dash.” According to the story, Hawks set a new round-trip speed record of 13 hours, 43 minutes, 59 seconds.

U. S. Navy dirigible Akron over Portland

Aerial photograph of the United States Navy dirigible Akron in flight above Portland on May 24, 1932. On that day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the Akron’s visit and published image No. 371N5036, a similar photograph to this one, on Page 4. The caption with that image included the following information about the dirigible: “The Akron is 785 feet long, weighs 403,000 pounds, and has 6,300,000 cubic feet gas volume. The ship has eight motors, totaling 4480 horsepower, and can make 83.8 miles an hour at top speed.” Image note: The number 6 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower left corner of the photograph.

U. S. Navy dirigible Akron over Portland

Aerial photograph of the United States Navy dirigible Akron in flight above Portland on May 24, 1932. On that day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the Akron’s visit and published image No. 371N5036, a similar photograph to this one, on Page 4. The caption with that image included the following information about the dirigible: “The Akron is 785 feet long, weighs 403,000 pounds, and has 6,300,000 cubic feet gas volume. The ship has eight motors, totaling 4480 horsepower, and can make 83.8 miles an hour at top speed.” Image note: The number 4 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower left corner of the photograph.

U. S. Navy dirigible Akron over Portland

Aerial photograph of the United States Navy dirigible Akron in flight above Portland on May 24, 1932. On that day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the Akron’s visit and published image No. 371N5036, a similar photograph to this one, on Page 4. The caption with that image included the following information about the dirigible: “The Akron is 785 feet long, weighs 403,000 pounds, and has 6,300,000 cubic feet gas volume. The ship has eight motors, totaling 4480 horsepower, and can make 83.8 miles an hour at top speed.” Image note: The number 1 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower left corner of the photograph.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of an unidentified man looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel, was killed. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, May 27, 1931, under the headline “To Death on West Hills Golf Course.” The photograph had the following caption: “Battered wreckage of the light plane in which Roy H. Sheffel [sic], operator of the Rendezvous eating place, made a fatal plunge to the seventh fairway of the West Hills golf course Tuesday afternoon. The picture was taken after the ship had been righted.” The photograph accompanied a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

George O. Noville at air circus on Swan Island, Portland

Portrait of a smiling man, aviator and explorer George O. Noville, wearing a suit, tie, and pince-nez. The photograph was taken on Saturday, June 9 or Sunday, June 10, 1928, at Swan Island airport in Portland. According to stories in the Oregon Journal on June 8 and June 10, 1928, Noville planned to attend the Portland’s second annual air carnival at Swan Island on June 10 and stay the week to see the Rose Festival. He arrived on June 9. See related image Nos. 371N2516, 371N2520, and 371N5952. Image note: The name “O. G. Noville [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Pilot Tex Rankin holding black cat

Photograph, taken August 24, 1928, of pilot Tex Rankin holding a black cat he borrowed from a Portland girl, Carol Mangold, to take with him on a national air race from New York to Los Angeles. The cat was one of two “jinxes” that Rankin deliberately adopted for the race; the other was to enter his plane under the number 13. On August 24, the day Rankin departed, the Oregon Journal published a story on Page 2 about the pilot and the cat; the headline was “Rankin and His Jinxes Go East to Start Derby.” See related image Nos. 371N2073, 371N5919, 371N6220, and 371N6222. Also see the following images related to Rankin's return from the race: 371N5921, 371N5922, 371N5923, 371N6141, 371N6150, and 377N0032. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Dick Rankin on catwalk of airplane On-To-Oregon

Photograph showing pilot Dick Rankin crouched on the catwalk affixed next to the engine of a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-To-Oregon, at the Rankin School of Flying in Portland. The photograph was taken on Friday, August 15, 1930, during preparations for an attempt by brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin to set an endurance flying record. The first attempt on August 17 was one of four unsuccessful tries the Rankins made that month. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four, including image Nos. 371N6128 and 371N6024, that was published on Page 3 of the August 15, 1930, edition of the Oregon Journal. The photographs were published under the headline “Almost Ready to Go Up and Stay Up.” They accompanied an article titled “Rankins Plan to Take Off Sunday.” This photograph had the following caption information: “Dick Rankin tries out the catwalk on which he and his brother will reach the motor while the flight is on.” Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6051, 371N6060, 371N6063, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

Mechanics preparing airplane On-To-Oregon for Rankin brothers’ endurance flight

Photograph of unidentified mechanics preparing a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-To-Oregon, for an attempt by brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin to set an endurance flying record. The photograph was taken on Friday, August 15, 1930, at the Rankin School of Flying in Portland. The Rankins made four unsuccessful attempts to break the endurance record in August 1930. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N6022 and 371N6128, was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on August 15, 1930. The photographs were published under the headline “Almost Ready to Go Up and Stay Up.” They accompanied a story titled “Rankins Plan to Take Off Sunday.” This photograph had the following caption: “Mechanics working on the 300 horsepower Wasp motor.” Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6025, 371N6051, 371N6060, 371N6063, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234. Image note: Damaged negative.

Two unidentified mechanics? With Rankin brothers’ airplane On-To-Oregon

Photograph of two unidentified men, probably mechanics, standing next to a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-to-Oregon, at the Rankin School of Flying in Portland. The photograph was taken on Friday, August 15, 1930, while mechanics were preparing the plane for an attempt by brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin to set an endurance flying record. The Rankins made four unsuccessful attempts to break the endurance record in August 1930; the first began on August 17. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6051, 371N6060, 371N6063, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

Pilot Tex Rankin speaking into Dictaphone before endurance flight

Photograph, taken from the side, showing pilot Tex Rankin speaking into a dictation recording machine. He is probably seated inside a Stinson Detroiter monoplane, the On-To-Oregon, on Sunday, August 17, 1930, before he and brothers Dick Rankin and Dud Rankin made the first of four unsuccessful attempts that month to set an endurance flying record. A cropped version of this photo was one of four, including image No. 371N6206, that was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Monday, August 18, 1930. The photographs were published under the headline “When Rankins Took Off on Attempt at Record.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the attempt. This photograph had the following caption: “Tex at the dictaphone, by means of which he hoped to carry on his business and give orders to his ground crew.” Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6063, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

L. B. Hickam and two unidentified men examining barograph for Rankin endurance flight?

Photograph showing three unidentified men outdoors, standing in a row. The man in the center is looking down at a box-shaped device he is holding in one hand. The photograph may have been taken at Rankin field in Portland on August 17, 1930, before brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin began an attempt later that day to set a record for endurance flying. The photograph may depict observers inspecting the official barograph that the Rankins would use during their flight. A barograph is an instrument that measures and records atmospheric pressure. The man in the center of this photograph may be L. B. Hickam, leader of the contest committee of the local chapter of the National Aeronautics Association, who was among the official observers of the Rankins’ attempt at the endurance record. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

L. B. Hickam and three unidentified men examining barograph for Rankin endurance flight?

Photograph showing four unidentified men outdoors. One man is kneeling in the grass and looking at a box-shaped device that he is holding to one eye. Two other men are crouching beside him, and a fourth man is leaning over them. The photograph may have been taken at Rankin field in Portland on August 17, 1930, before brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin began an attempt later that day to set a record for endurance flying. The photograph may depict observers inspecting the official barograph that the Rankins would use during their flight. A barograph is an instrument that measures and records atmospheric pressure. The man at left who is standing and leaning over to look at the barograph may be L. B. Hickam, leader of the contest committee of the local chapter of the National Aeronautics Association, who was among the official observers of the Rankins’ attempt at the endurance record. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6063, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

Charles W. “Speed” Holman, Phil, and E. E. Ballough next to airplane

Portrait of three men standing in a row next to an airplane, probably at Swan Island airport in Portland. The man at left is pilot Charles W. “Speed” Holman, and the man at right is probably pilot E. E. Ballough. The photograph was probably taken on September 27, 1927, after Holman won the Class A race in a Spokane-to-Portland air derby and Ballough took second place. The text “Ballough - Phil - Holman” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. Also see related image Nos. 371N0595, 371N5913, 371N6105, 371N6107, 371N6108, 371N6112, and 371N6126.

Tex Rankin, Richard E. Byrd, and Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins next to airplane

Photograph showing (from left) pilot Tex Rankin; United States naval officer, aviator, and explorer Commander Richard E. Byrd; and Portland Chief of Police Leon V. Jenkins standing in a row next to an airplane on February 12, 1927. The photograph was taken before Rankin took Byrd and Jenkins on a flight over Portland. Byrd was in Portland to deliver two lectures about his flight to the North Pole in May 1926.

Artwork on side of Rankin brothers’ airplane On-To-Oregon

Photograph showing the words “Tex Rankin School of Flying “ and artwork by A. G. Weber on the side of a Stinson Detroiter monoplane named On-To-Oregon. The photograph was taken on August 15, 1930, at the Rankin School of Flying in Portland, while mechanics were preparing the plane for an attempt by brothers Tex Rankin, Dick Rankin, and Dud Rankin to set an endurance flying record. The Rankins made four unsuccessful attempts at the record in August 1930. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N6022 and 371N6024, was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on August 15, 1930. The photographs were published under the headline “Almost Ready to Go Up and Stay Up.” They accompanied a story titled “Rankins Plan to Take Off Sunday.” This photograph had the following caption: “The name ‘On-to-Oregon’ and picture of the covered wagon and oxen on the plane’s side.” Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

People gathered around Rankin brothers’ airplane On-to-Oregon

Photograph showing people gathered around a Stinson Detroiter monoplane named On-to-Oregon, possibly at Rankin airfield in Portland. On the side of the plane are its name and artwork by A. G. Weber depicting oxen and a covered wagon. The photograph was probably taken in August 1930, when pilot Tex Rankin and his brothers, Dick Rankin and Dud Rankin, flew the plane in four unsuccessful attempts to set a record for endurance flying. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6199, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234.

Man in cockpit of airplane On-to-Oregon

Photograph of an unidentified man sitting in the cockpit of a Breese monoplane with the name “On-to-Oregon” on the side and the number X844 N” on the tail. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, July 22, 1930, under the headline “All Set for Good-Will Flight.” The photograph had the following caption: “The Breese monoplane On-to-Oregon, which is scheduled to take off from Swan Island airport, carrying good-will messages to the East, between 8 and 10 o’clock tonight. The flight, sponsored by On-to-Oregon, Inc., is planned to be made with only one stop—at Minneapolis.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Oregon Plane To Hop East Tonight.” According to the story, the plane was to be flown from Portland to New York by Major G. H. Eckerson, test pilot for Breese Aircraft.

Tex Rankin showing winnings from air race

Photograph showing pilot Tex Rankin holding up two checks, his winnings in an air race from New York to Los Angeles. Onlookers are visible in the background. The photograph was taken on September 22, 1928, after Rankin’s return to Portland. On September 23, 1928, the Oregon Journal published Page 3 story about Rankin’s return, headlined “Rankin and Jinx Cat Back Home; Everybody Glad.” In the story, the Journal reported that Rankin had placed fifth in the race. After arriving in Portland, the Journal reported, “he exhibited two checks--one for $500 as the fifth prize and the other for $25 as a prize given at the second control station of the flight.” See related image Nos. 371N5921, 371N5922, 371N5923, 371N6150, and 377N0032. Also see the following images related to Rankin's departure for the race: Nos. 371N2073, 371N5919, 371N5920, 371N6220, and 371N6222.

Submerged Forest

Tree trunks that are part of the Submerged Forest in the water of the Columbia River. Wind Mountain is visible in the background. Caption from negative sleeve reads, "Landscape, R52, LW2-33."

White, Lily E.

Passing through Locks

Photograph taken from the deck of a boat passing through the opening gates of a lock. Likely Cascade Locks. Small groups of people are standing on the top of the lock walls on either side. Caption from negative sleeve reads, "Canal, 69, LW2-50."

White, Lily E.

Results 1905 to 1927 of 1927