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Commander Louis J. Gulliver waving farewell from USS Constitution

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, waving from the top of the gangplank before the ship’s departure from Portland on August 22, 1933, after a three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, a cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3705 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver of the frigate waves farewell to an appreciative and grateful city.” Image note: Light leak on negative.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (second from left), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (right) and unidentified sailors saluting as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after returning from a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken aboard the Constitution on August 11, 1933, while the ship and crew were in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3713 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, left, stepping onto the decks of ‘Old Ironsides,’ with side-boys at salute, and welcomed by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Hartley, who had command of the frigate during Gulliver’s absence on leave. Hartley relinquished command and resumed his duties as executive officer.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Old Ironsides.” The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the honors marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of USS Constitution

Half-length portrait of Commander Louis J. Gulliver facing front. The photograph was taken in Portland in May 1933, when Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, inspected the moorage at Swan Island prior to a visit by the frigate and crew in August as part of a national tour. With Gulliver were Lieutenant. H. St Johns Butler (background, left), the ship’s navigating officer, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer. A story, headlined “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Chief Praises Moorage Here,” and related image No. 371N3715 were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on May 12, 1933.

Group at tea during visit of USS Constitution to Portland

Portrait of the commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, members of his family, and others at a tea on Friday, August 18, 1933. The tea was held during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and its crew. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Group at Friday tea, in front row from left are Phylis Drake and Grace Gulliver and in rear row Marion Bass, Commander [Louis J.] Gulliver, Mrs. Gulliver and Marjorie Bass.” Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3730, and 371N3736, which were published with this photograph.

Descendants of Revolutionary War captain William Van Cleve aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Full-length portrait showing six descendants of William Van Cleve posing aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in August 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and a short story were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 10, 1933, under the headline “Ship Visit Unites Family.” The photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Joseph Collins Van Cleve of U. S. S. Constitution brings definite proof to Circuit Judge Clarence H. Gilbert and Dr. Archie Van Cleve of Portland that they are descendants of William Van Cleve, a captain in the Revolutionary war. From left, aboard Old Ironsides, are Judge Gilbert, Dr. Van Cleve, Bertelle Van Cleve, 5; Katherine Gilbert, 20; Joanne Van Cleve, 12; Lieutenant Van Cleve.” According to the accompanying story, Bertelle and Joanne Van Cleve are the daughters of Archie Van Cleve, and Katharine Gilbert (spelled differently in the caption than in the story) is the daughter of Judge Gilbert.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson holding a bronze plaque commemorating the visit of the frigate USS Constitution to Portland. The photograph was taken during a ceremony aboard the frigate on Thursday, August 10, 1933, in which Carson presented the plaque to the ship’s executive officer, Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (second from right). Several unidentified men are watching Carson; the man at left may be City Commissioner Earl Riley. A story about the presentation, headlined “City Presents Bronze Plaque to ‘Ironsides,’ ” was published in the Oregon Journal the day of the ceremony. See related image Nos. 371N3728 and 371N3729.

Crew of Point Adams Coast Guard station near Hammond, Oregon

Full-length portrait of six men standing in a row, facing front, next to the station house at the Point Adams Coast Guard station near Hammond, Oregon. The text “Point Adams CoastGuard Station Crew / (Lars Bjelland in center)” and the unverified date “10/22/1934” are written on the negative sleeve. Also see image Nos. 371N0241, 371N5711, 371N5713, 371N5714, and 371N5715.

Earl Riley, Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at dedication of Waverly Baby Home, Portland

Photograph showing (from left) Earl Riley, Oregon first lady Grace Meier, L. E. Kern, and Rufus C. Holman at the dedication of the new Waverly Baby Home building in Portland on November 28, 1931. They are standing in front of the building’s cornerstone, which has not yet been placed, and Meier is holding a bouquet of flowers. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3021 were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on November 29, 1931, under the headline “New Home for Babies Dedicated.” This photograph had the following caption: “From left, Earl Riley, city commissioner; Mrs. Julius L. Meier receiving bouquet from L. E. Kern, president of the board of trustees of the Waverly Baby home, and State Treasurer Rufus C. Holman, at the dedication of the new $115,000 home for parentless waifs Saturday. Riley represented the city and Holmes for the state.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the opening of the new building.

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Half-length portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name “Bill Genn” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Senti family dog in field after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti’s fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

William Edward Hickman and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane

Photograph showing William Edward Hickman (right) and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane (left, in background) in December 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928. He was executed in October 1928. A cropped version of this photograph was one of several, including image Nos. 371N3579 and 371N3581, that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927, under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime.” This photograph had the caption “Hickman and Police Chief Gurdane.” The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Also see image Nos. 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076. Image note: The text “Hiekman + Gurdane” (sic) is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. LaDue, operators of Robinwood service station, after holdup

Portrait of Mr. and Mrs. R. W. LaDue behind the counter at their service station. This photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on February 21, 1931, along with Image No. 371N0230, under the headline “Bandit Victim ‘Gets His Man.” The image had the following caption: “Mr and Mrs. R. W. LaDue, operators of the Robinwood service station and lunchroom between Oswego and West Linn, are shown in their establishment which was held up by William Wheeler, 22, Friday night, with fatal result to the bandit. LaDue, after the youth left the building, picked up a .30-30 rifle and fired five shots, three of them hitting Wheeler has he attempted to flee from the scene in an automobile.” Image note: The text “Mr + Mrs LaDue” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish

Photograph showing dining room crime scene in the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered while playing solitaire at his table and was found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish's killing. See image No. 371N3518, which may also have been taken in Mish’s home after his death.

Senti family dog after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A similar photograph, image No. 371N3380, was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” The photograph of Trixie had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti's fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875. Image note: Photograph is out of focus.

Thomas Jefferson statue, Jefferson High School, Portland

Photograph of a bronze statue of Thomas Jefferson on the campus of Jefferson High School in Portland. The figure of Jefferson is sitting in a chair with one arm resting on the chair back. On the side of the base is the following text, all in uppercase letters: “ ‘Bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal laws must protect, and to violate would be oppression.’ / Thomas Jefferson.” A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Jefferson statue was stop number 12 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

Spanish-American War memorial in Portland

Photograph of a bronze statue of a man holding a rifle. The figure stands atop a pillar that bears the following words in uppercase letters: “Erected by the citizens of Oregon to the dead of the Second Oregon United States Volunteer Infantry / Anno Domini MDCCCCIV.” On the round base below the pillar are the words “First in Guam / First in Philippines.” The sculpture was made by Douglas Tilden and placed in Lownsdale Square in Portland, on Southwest 4th Avenue between Southwest Main Street and Southwest Salmon Street. The statue was dedicated on May 30, 1906. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Spanish-American War memorial was stop number 1 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2899, and 371N2900, which were also part of the spread. Image note: Light leak on negative.

1932 Portland Rose Festival Queen Frances Kanzler with court

Portrait of the 1932 Rose Festival queen and princesses, all wearing matching dresses. The queen, Frances Kanzler, is sitting on a throne and is holding a bouquet of roses. The princesses are sitting on the dais around and below her. A similar photograph, image No. 371N2994, was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on June 5, 1932, under the headline “New Festival Queen and Her Royal Princesses.” That photograph had the following caption: “Queen Frances Kanzler, Washington high school senior, and her seven high school princes [sic] who will rule over Portland’s annual fiesta of the rose, June 16-17-18, in their royal robes. Front row, from left: Hazel May Bennett, Lincoln; Leone Hale Baker, Franklin; Florence Marie Kelly, Grant. Back row, from left: Miriam Alice Parsons, Roosevelt; Jeanne Van Dersal, High School of Commerce; Queen Frances; Garlyn Genevieve Morgan, Girls’ Polytechnic, and Ferol Helen Richardson, Jefferson.” Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Vincent, Ralph

Lola Knutson walks across stage during beauty contest at Jantzen Beach

Photograph of Lola Knutson, representing the Bagdad Theatre, waving as she walks across an outdoor stage during a beauty contest at Jantzen Beach in Portland on August 15, 1929. She is wearing heels, a sash with the words “Miss Bagdad Theatre” printed on it, and a swimming suit. Musicians are playing on the stage behind her. Knutson was one of 23 women to participate in the beauty contest at a picnic sponsored by the East Side Commercial Club. She took second prize in the contest. A brief story about the contest and picnic was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 16, 1929, under the headline “Bathing Girls Not Afraid to Get Hair Damp.”

Three beauty contestants

Photograph of three unidentified women posing outdoors. They are wearing heels and what appear to be swimsuits. The woman on the left is wearing a sash with the words “Miss Portland” on it and the woman in the center is wearing a sash bearing the words “Miss Medford.” See related image of Miss Portland, No. 371N3051.

Jerry Chenoweth walks across stage during beauty contest at Jantzen Beach

Photograph of Jerry Chenoweth, representing the Oriental Theatre, walking across an outdoor stage during a beauty contest at Jantzen Beach in Portland on August 15, 1929. She is wearing heels and a swimming suit. Musicians are playing on the stage behind her. Chenoweth won the contest, which had 23 participants and was part of a picnic sponsored by the East Side Commercial Club. A brief story about the contest and picnic was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 16, 1929, under the headline “Bathing Girls Not Afraid to Get Hair Damp.”

Beauty contestants parade at Jantzen Beach

Photograph showing a group of women, all wearing swimming suits and sashes, walking in a line during a beauty contest at Jantzen Beach in Portland on August 15, 1929. The woman on the far left is Mary Benoit; the other women are unidentified. Twenty-three women participated in the beauty contest, which was part of a picnic sponsored by the East Side Commercial Club. A brief story about the contest and picnic was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 16, 1929, under the headline “Bathing Girls Not Afraid to Get Hair Damp.”

Beauty contestants posing with car at Jantzen Beach

Portrait of a group of women posing with a car at Jantzen Beach in Portland on August 15, 1929. They are wearing sashes and swimming suits. The women, each representing a business or organization, participated in a beauty contest held as part of a picnic sponsored by the East Side Commercial Club. The woman at front center, sitting on the bumper of the car and wearing an “Oriental Theatre” sash, is Jerry Chenoweth, who won the contest. Standing next to her is Mary Benoit, representing Sears Roebuck Co., who took second place. A brief story about the contest and picnic was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 16, 1929, under the headline “Bathing Girls Not Afraid to Get Hair Damp.”

Beauty contestants posing with car at Jantzen Beach

Portrait of a group of women posing with a car at Jantzen Beach in Portland on August 15, 1929. They are wearing sashes and swimming suits. The women, each representing a business or organization, participated in a beauty contest held as part of a picnic sponsored by the East Side Commercial Club. The woman at front center, sitting on the bumper of the car and wearing an “Oriental Theatre” sash, is Jerry Chenoweth, who won the contest. Standing next to her is Mary Benoit, representing Sears Roebuck Co., who took second place. A brief story about the contest and picnic was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 16, 1929, under the headline “Bathing Girls Not Afraid to Get Hair Damp.”

Medford Voiture 165 truck in Salem parade

Photograph of unidentified men from Medford Voiture 165 of the Forty and Eight riding on a truck and trailer in a parade in Salem, Oregon. They are on North Liberty Street at the intersection with Court Street (now the intersection of Liberty Street NE and Court Street NE). Also see image Nos. 371N4858, 371N4920, 371N4921, and 371N4922.

Military color guard marching in parade

Photograph of six uniformed men marching in a Portland parade. The four men at center are carrying flags. They are walking past the Pacific Building (at left), located in downtown Portland between SW 5th and 6th avenues and SW Yamhill and Taylor streets. The men are unidentified.

Results 1 to 28 of 2004