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Portland (Or.) cellulose nitrate film With digital objects
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Brigadier General Paul A. Wolf presents Distinguished Service Cross to Helmuth B. Dewitz

Photograph of Brigadier General Paul A. Wolf (left) and Helmuth B. Dewitz after Wolf presented Dewitz with the Distinguished Service Cross, visible on Dewitz’s lapel. Dewitz received the medal in recognition of valor in France in 1918, during World War I; Wolf was his commander. The photograph was taken on March 29, 1932, at the National Guard armory in Portland. Image note: “Helmuth B. De Witz + Wolfe” (sic) is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image.

General Stanley H. Ford

Head and shoulders portrait of Brigadier General Stanley H. Ford facing slightly left. He is wearing a hat, overcoat, collared shirt, and tie. The photograph was taken after his arrival in Portland on February 20, 1933, to take command of the 5th Brigade at the United States Army post in Vancouver, Washington. The text “Gen Ford” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. See related image No. 371N0864.

General Fuqua outside Multnomah Hotel, Portland

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing slightly left. He is wearing a United States military uniform. The text “Gen. Fuque [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. The man is probably U. S. Army Major General Stephen O. Fuqua, who visited Portland and the Army post in Vancouver, Washington, on July 18, 1930. See related image Nos. 371N0889 and 371N0891.

Memorial service at Multnomah Stadium, Portland, honoring people killed in World War I

Photograph showing a memorial service honoring Canadians and Americans killed in World War I. The service was held at Multnomah Stadium in Portland on Wednesday, June 13, 1934. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 18 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, June 13, 1934, under the headline “Dedicators of Cenotaph Pay Honor to Comrades in Death.” The photographs had the following caption: “At Multnomah stadium Wednesday veterans and high civic officials of Canada and the United States joined to unveil a cenotaph memorial for war dead of both nations as symbolic of lasting friendship between the two countries. The dedication climaxed the Canadian Legion convention held here this week.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Just before flags of the United States, Great Britain, and Canada were raised on the towering flag pole.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Veterans Pay High Tribute to War Dead.” According to the story, the cenotaph unveiled at the service bore the following inscription: “In grateful tribute to the men and women of Canada and the United States who gave their lives in the World war. May their heroic sacrifice insure lasting peace among the nations. Dedicated at the Canadian Legion convention, June 13, 1934.” Also see image No. 371N3002, which may also have been taken at the memorial service.

Cyril G. Manning breaking ground for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing veteran Cyril G. Manning digging a shovelful of earth during a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. A band is playing in the background. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Break Ground for Veterans’ Hospital.” This photograph had the following caption: “Cyril G. Manning, disabled World war veteran, digs first shovelful of earth.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3014, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

Groundbreaking ceremony for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing the crowd at a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. At center right is veteran Cyril G. Manning, who performed the groundbreaking. At center left is an unidentified man holding a shovel. A story about the ceremony was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

USS Constitution under way on Willamette River, leaving Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and an accompanying tugboat on the Willamette River off Waud Bluff as the ship departs Portland on Tuesday, August 22, 1933. The frigate and crew visited Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3716 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal the day the ship departed. The photographs were published under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “The Constitution as she appeared below Columbia university on the way down river shortly after 6 a.m. Tuesday after a 21-day stay here.” Columbia University is now the University of Portland.

USS Constitution and tugboat sailing under St. Johns Bridge

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and a Shaver Transportation Company tugboat sailing under the St. Johns Bridge in Portland in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 22, 1933, when the frigate departed for Kalama after a visit to Portland as part of a national tour. At far right is the USS Grebe, which accompanied and towed the Constitution on the tour. A story, headlined “Old Frigate Leaves After 21-Day Stay” and two related images, Nos. 371N3705 and 371N3716, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 22, 1933. See related image No. 371N5539.

USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland, in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. A crowd is partially visible in the foreground. This photograph may have been taken on Friday, August 18, 1933, when a large crowd of spectators watched sailors set the sails on the frigate’s mizzenmast. See image No. 371N3712.

Crowd watching crew members set sails on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing a crowd of spectators watching crew members set sails on the mizzenmast of the USS Constitution on Friday, August 18, 1933. The ship was moored on Swan Island, Portland, during a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, August 19, 1933, under the headline “Constitution Preens Wings.” This photograph had the following caption: “While thousands of Portlanders looked on from the airport and the hill sides, sailors on ‘Old Ironsides’ set sails on the mizzenmast of the old warrior late Friday. Top picture shows the sails unfurled.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley shaking hands as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken on August 11, 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return, headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Ironsides” was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. See related image Nos. 371N3713 and 371N3719. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Presentation of Oregon state flag to crew of USS Constitution?

Photograph showing two unidentified women and four U. S. Navy officers standing in a row on a ship, holding a flag depicting a beaver. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, at a reception aboard the frigate USS Constitution after the ship arrived in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. In a front-page story on August 3, 1933, the Oregon Journal reported the following about the ceremony: “The outstanding feature of the reception was presentation of the official flag of Oregon to Commander [Henry] Hartley and the ship by the Daughters of 1812. Mrs. George H. Root, president, made the speech of presentation telling how glad the people of Portland were to have the privilege of visiting the great naval shrine and welcoming the officers and men. Miss Esther Allen Jobes, granddaughter of the founding president of the organization, presented the flag to the commander.” Also see image No. 371N0473.

Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, Mayor George L. Baker, and three unidentified men at Multnomah Stadium

Photograph of five men standing in a row on the field at Multnomah Civic Stadium during an event. In front of them is an unidentified Portland police officer. The man at left is Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, and the second man from left is Portland Mayor George L. Baker. The other three men are unidentified.

Dedication of giant air-mail box at 6th and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing a small crowd at the dedication of a huge air-mail collection box on the corner of what is now Southwest Sixth Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street. Standing in front of the box and holding a large prop key are Dr. L. T. Jones (left), president of the Portland Exchange Club, and John M. Jones, Portland postmaster. The box was set up by the exchange club to collect mail that would be carried east by the Varney air-mail service. The box was equipped with a loudspeaker to broadcast messages about air mail. The dedication took place on September 3, 1929.

Portland? firefighters manning hoses

Photograph showing unidentified firefighters, probably from the Portland Fire Department, standing in a street and holding several hoses that are spraying water toward the left, at a target outside the frame. The firefighter in the center is wearing a helmet with a large number 1 on the front. Above the 1 are the words “FIRE BOAT,” and below it are the letters “PFD.”

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name Bill Genn is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt awarding title of honorary deputy to Oregon Journal editor B. F. Irvine

Photograph showing Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt (left) pinning a badge (not visible) to the lapel of Oregon Journal editor Benjamin Franklin Irvine. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on January 22, 1932, under the headline “Sheriff of 36 Counties.” The photograph had the following caption: “B. F. Irvine, editor of The Journal, being presented with a gold star by Sheriff Martin Pratt, making him an honorary deputy sheriff in all of Oregon’s counties, in appreciation of his work in supporting peace officers.” Image note: The name “B. F. Irvine” is written on the negative and is faintly visible at the bottom of the image.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish?

Photograph showing a telephone table in the corner of a room. The table and nearby wall molding are covered with what appears to be blood. A framed photograph is hanging on the wall next to the telephone. The photograph may have been taken at the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered there and found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. The wallpaper in this photograph appears to be the same as in image No. 371N3516, showing Mish’s dining room, where he was killed. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish’s killing.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (front, left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "Hickman's arrival at Portland jail." The photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3579, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

'Coming of the White Man' statue, Washington Park, Portland

Photograph showing a bronze statue, “Coming of the White Man,” depicting Chief Multnomah and a younger man looking toward the Columbia River gap. The figure of Chief Multnomah stands with his arms crossed, while the younger man holds a branch aloft, gesturing toward the river and approaching white men. The statue is located in Portland’s Washington Park. The family of former Portland Mayor David Thompson gave the money for the statue, which was sculpted by Hermon Atkins MacNeil and completed in 1904. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. “Coming of the White Man” was stop number 6 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5422, 371N5461, 371N2899, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

Beauty contestant Mary Benoit at Jantzen Beach

Photograph of Mary Benoit, representing Sears Roebuck Co., smiling and posing with one hand on her hip as others look on in the background. She is wearing heels, a swimming suit, and a sash with the words “Miss Sears Roebuck Co.” printed on it. Benoit took third place in a beauty contest held at Jantzen Beach in Portland on August 15, 1929, as part of a picnic sponsored by the East Side Commercial Club. The contest had 23 participants, each representing a business or organization. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 16, 1929, alongside pictures of Jerry Chenoweth (image No. 371N3050), who won the contest, and Lola Knutson (image No. 371N3047), who took second place. The photographs were published under the headline "East Side's Winning Maids," and accompanied a short article about the contest, titled "Bathing Girls Not Afraid to Get Hair Damp."

Beauty contestants parade at Jantzen Beach

Photograph showing a group of unidentified women walking in a line during a beauty contest at Jantzen Beach in Portland on August 15, 1929. Twenty-three women participated in the beauty contest, which was part of a picnic sponsored by the East Side Commercial Club. A brief story about the contest and picnic was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 16, 1929, under the headline “Bathing Girls Not Afraid to Get Hair Damp.”

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