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Oregon Journal Photographic Negatives United States cellulose nitrate film
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Senti family barn, site of murder

Photograph showing the Senti family barn near Vancouver, Washington, where Tobias Senti killed his wife. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Barn in which the body of Mrs. Senti was found.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875.

Senti family dog after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A similar photograph, image No. 371N3380, was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” The photograph of Trixie had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti's fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875. Image note: Photograph is out of focus.

Senti family home, site of murder

Photograph showing the Senti family house near Vancouver, Washington, where Tobias Senti killed his children. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “The house in which the family lived on a small farm.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N3508, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and Buck Lieuallen after Hickman’s capture

Photograph of Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and State Traffic Officer Buck Lieuallen in Pendleton, probably on December 22, 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, December 23, 1927. The photograph was published under the headline and subhead "Doubling Back Was Fatal to Fugitive / Conclusion of Manhunt That Reached Over the Entire Length of Pacific Coast." The photograph had the following caption: "Above, left to right, Tom Gurdane, Pendleton chief of police, captor; William Edward Hickman, prisoner; Traffic Sergeant Buck Lieuallen, captor." Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, and 373G0076.

Norr, Roy

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "Hickman's arrival at Portland jail." The photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3579, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to man on left), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to third man from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "The prisoner securely handcuffed as he alighted from train at Montavilla Sunday evening." This photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3581, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (front, left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish?

Photograph showing a telephone table in the corner of a room. The table and nearby wall molding are covered with what appears to be blood. A framed photograph is hanging on the wall next to the telephone. The photograph may have been taken at the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered there and found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. The wallpaper in this photograph appears to be the same as in image No. 371N3516, showing Mish’s dining room, where he was killed. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish’s killing.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish

Photograph showing dining room crime scene in the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered while playing solitaire at his table and was found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish's killing. See image No. 371N3518, which may also have been taken in Mish’s home after his death.

Hatchet used by Tobias Senti in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the hatchet used by Tobias Senti to kill his wife and children. The hatchet is held up by an unidentified person; only the person’s hand is in the frame. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Hatchet with which Senti killed his wife and children.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Senti family dog in field after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti’s fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. LaDue, operators of Robinwood service station, after holdup

Portrait of Mr. and Mrs. R. W. LaDue behind the counter at their service station. This photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on February 21, 1931, along with Image No. 371N0230, under the headline “Bandit Victim ‘Gets His Man.” The image had the following caption: “Mr and Mrs. R. W. LaDue, operators of the Robinwood service station and lunchroom between Oswego and West Linn, are shown in their establishment which was held up by William Wheeler, 22, Friday night, with fatal result to the bandit. LaDue, after the youth left the building, picked up a .30-30 rifle and fired five shots, three of them hitting Wheeler has he attempted to flee from the scene in an automobile.” Image note: The text “Mr + Mrs LaDue” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

William Edward Hickman and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane

Photograph showing William Edward Hickman (right) and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane (left, in background) in December 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928. He was executed in October 1928. A cropped version of this photograph was one of several, including image Nos. 371N3579 and 371N3581, that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927, under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime.” This photograph had the caption “Hickman and Police Chief Gurdane.” The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Also see image Nos. 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076. Image note: The text “Hiekman + Gurdane” (sic) is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Albert D. Glibert, killer of mill superintendent John W. Bevis

Head and shoulders portrait of mill worker and murder suspect A. D. Glibert. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on February 28, 1931, and again on March 1, 1931. On February 28, the photograph was published on the Journal’s front page under the headline “Grudge Leads to Murder.” The photograph had the following caption: “Albert D. Glibert, who today shot and killed John W. Bevis, superintendent of the Inman Poulsen mill, because he blamed Bevis for his discharge. Glibert then turned his weapon on Bevis’ assistant, George W. Martin, and inflicted serious injury.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Mill Boss Slain, Aide Badly Shot.” On March 1, the photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal with image No. 371N3218, depicting a note that Glibert wrote before the shooting. On that day, this photograph had the following caption: “Taken by a Journal staff cameraman a few minutes after Glibert was overpowered by fellow employees.” Later, on July 30, 1931, the Journal reported that Glibert had pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison. The Journal reported that the plea followed a trial on first-degree murder charges in which the jury was unable to agree on a verdict. Image note: The name “A. D. Gilbert [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the photograph. Image note: The photograph shows discoloration from deterioration of the negative.

Mrs. Pearl Billings in jail after holdup at service station

Portrait of 18-year-old Pearl Billings sitting in a chair in her cell at the Clackamas County Jail in Oregon City on Saturday, February 21, 1931. According to a story published on the front page of the Oregon Journal that day, Billings was arrested after participating in a holdup with 22-year-old William Wheeler at the Robinwood service station near Lake Oswego on February 20, 1931. During the robbery, Wheeler was shot and killed by the service station’s proprietor, R. W. LaDue. According to the story, Billings told police Wheeler had kidnapped her and she had no knowledge of plans to hold up the service station until they were inside. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N1454, showing Mr. and Mrs. LaDue, accompanied the story. The photographs were published under the headline "Bandit Victim 'Gets His Man.' " This photograph had the following caption: "Mrs. Pearl Billings, companion of the dead man. She went outside and started the car's engine for the proposed escape. Mrs. Billings fled from the scene but was captured by sheriff [E. T.] Mass of Clackamas county a short while later. She is held in the county jail at Oregon City." Image note: The name “Mrs Pearl Billings” and the number 18 in a circle are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image.

Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt awarding title of honorary deputy to Oregon Journal editor B. F. Irvine

Photograph showing Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt (left) pinning a badge (not visible) to the lapel of Oregon Journal editor Benjamin Franklin Irvine. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on January 22, 1932, under the headline “Sheriff of 36 Counties.” The photograph had the following caption: “B. F. Irvine, editor of The Journal, being presented with a gold star by Sheriff Martin Pratt, making him an honorary deputy sheriff in all of Oregon’s counties, in appreciation of his work in supporting peace officers.” Image note: The name “B. F. Irvine” is written on the negative and is faintly visible at the bottom of the image.

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name Bill Genn is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Half-length portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name “Bill Genn” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Firefighter? on ladder above crowd

Photograph showing an unidentified man, possibly a firefighter, on a ladder extending horizontally over a crowd of people standing in the street, probably in downtown Portland. A brass band is in the background on the right. A sign for a Charles F. Berg store is visible on a building in the background on the left.

Portland? firefighters manning hoses

Photograph showing unidentified firefighters, probably from the Portland Fire Department, standing in a street and holding several hoses that are spraying water toward the left, at a target outside the frame. The firefighter in the center is wearing a helmet with a large number 1 on the front. Above the 1 are the words “FIRE BOAT,” and below it are the letters “PFD.”

Fire at Pacific Stationery and Printing Company, Portland

Photograph of smoke pouring out of the the upper windows of the Pacific Stationery and Printing Co. building in Portland on July 29, 1926. Firefighters are gathered on the ground in front of the building and are climbing ladders to the upper windows. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, July 29, 1926, under the headline "Down-Town Fire Endangers Employes' Lives" (sic). The photograph had the following caption: "Photograph taken during the height of the fire at the Pacific Stationery & Printing Co.'s plant, No. 107 Second street, this afternoon. Loss in paper stock, office furniture and damage to the building was heavy. Some employes [sic], cut off by burning stairways, escaped by dropping to the roof of an adjoining building. Huge noon-hour crowds were attracted to the fire which was spectacular." The photograph accompanied a story titled "Fire Hits Printing Company." According to the story, one firefighter was injured and the financial loss from the fire was estimated at $185,000. The stationery company was located in downtown Portland on what is now Southwest 2nd Avenue between Southwest Washington and Southwest Harvey Milk streets.

Unidentified group at fire chiefs’ convention?

Photograph showing a group of unidentified people standing in two rows outside Portland City Hall, possibly at a fire chiefs’ convention. Most of the people in the photograph are wearing suits and ties; some are in uniform. On the building behind them is a banner with an emblem and the words “FIRE CHIEFS WELCOME” on it. See related image No. 371N3058. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Unveiling of David Campbell memorial, Portland

Photograph showing a crowd of seated people at the memorial to Portland Fire Chief David Campbell during the monument’s unveiling on Thursday, June 28, 1928. The memorial is between Southwest Alder Street and Southwest 18th and 19th avenues. Campbell was killed on June 26, 1911, while fighting a fire at the Union Oil distribution plant. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, June 29, 1928, under the headline “Statue Unveiled to City’s Firemen Dead.” The photograph had the following caption: “Cenotaph’s formal presentation to the city marks exact hour of 17 years ago when Fire Chief David Campbell was buried. This memorial at 19th and Washington streets [sic], is a tribute to him and all firemen who have died in line of duty.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Myrtyred [sic] Chief Honored; Statue to Him Unveiled.”

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