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Women on parade float, possibly in Astoria

Photograph of unidentified women in matching dresses riding on a parade float. One woman is sitting in an elevated seat under a canopy decorated with a United States flag. The photograph may have been taken in Astoria, Oregon. Also see image Nos. 371N4877 and 371N4881. Image note: Photograph is blurred and shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Girls in parade, wearing costumes imitating Indian clothing

Photograph of a group of unidentified girls wearing costumes consisting of fringed dresses and skirts, beaded necklaces, and headbands with feathers. Some of the girls appear to be wearing face paint. The photograph is related to a parade and may have been taken in Astoria, Oregon. Also see image No. 371N4890. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Parade, possibly in Astoria

Photograph of a costumed man on horseback and a Portland Elks Lodge 142 band marching in a parade, possibly in Astoria, Oregon. Spectators are lining the street. Also see image No. 371N4916. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Rex Oregonus dismounting from elephant

Photograph of Tommy Luke, in the role of Rex Oregonus, sliding off a crouching elephant at Multnomah Civic Stadium during the 1929 Rose Festival. Rex Oregonus was co-regent with the Rose Festival queen. Portland Mayor George L. Baker is walking nearby on the right side of the image. The number 3 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image. Also see image No. 371N2998.

Goat and members of Columbia Theatre Boys Drum Corps

Photograph of a goat wearing a banner with the text “Columbia Theatre Boys Drum Corps.” Next to the goat, partially outside the frame, are unidentified people in uniforms carrying drums. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative. The photograph may have been taken in Astoria, Oregon.

Parade float, possibly in Astoria

Photograph of two unidentified people on a parade float carrying what appears to be a pile of barrels. The float is draped with banners. Houses are visible in the background. The photograph may have been taken in Astoria, Oregon. Image note: Photograph is out of focus and shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Men in uniform watching parade in Astoria

Photograph of a line of unidentified men in uniform standing in a street and watching as decorated cars drive by. A band is walking down the street behind the line of men. The photograph was taken at the corner of 6th and Commercial streets in Astoria, Oregon. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Drum major, possibly in Astoria

Photograph of a drum major, probably from Portland Elks Lodge 142, standing next to a building with his hands resting on his baton. Two men in uniforms are standing nearby; the man on the left is wearing a Lodge 142 marching band uniform. The photograph was probably taken in Astoria, Oregon, and is related to a parade; also see image No. 371N4912. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Rex Oregonus on Portland Rose Festival parade float

Portrait of a man wearing a robe, sash, and plumed turban. He is standing on a float with six young women in matching gowns and headdresses. The man is holding a key to the city made from radishes, beets, and carrots. The words “Rex Oregonus” are painted along the bottom of the float. This photograph was probably taken at the 1929 Rose Festival, when Tommy Luke was crowned Rex Oregonus, co-regent with the festival queen. The number 8 is written on the negative and is faintly visible in the lower right corner of the image. Also see image No. 371N4402.

Ross Island Bridge

Photograph, taken from below, of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland. The photograph may have been taken in December 1926, when the bridge was completed; the streetlights on the bridge appear to be decorated as they were for dedication ceremonies on December 21, 1926.

Ross Island Bridge

Photograph of the Ross Island Bridge in Portland, possibly taken in December 1926. A similar photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on December 21, 1926, the day the bridge was dedicated.

Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church collection, 1940-2015

  • Coll 189
  • Collection
  • 1940 - 2015

The collection covers various aspects of the history of the church and of its leader, Rev. O.B. Williams, and his wife Willa Jackson Williams. It includes a variety of photographs, with a large percentage of the images relating to the various church groups, including choirs, youth groups, and ushers. A large collection of members’ memorial cards, the pastoral anniversaries of Rev. Williams, some bibles and hymnals (many annotated by Rev. Williams, including two dated 1867 and 1890), church financial records and meeting minutes, and a collection of materials from Dr. Martin Luther King’s 1961 visit are included. A small collection of the Williams’ personal photographs and ephemera can also be found in collection.

Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church (Portland, Or.)

Oral History Interview with Bette Lee, by Sandy Polishuk [Transcript]

Transcript. Bette Lee discusses her activism and career in photographing protests, beginning in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1980s, and later in Portland, Oregon. She discusses several specific photographs, many of which can be found in the transcript. Protests and movements discussed include the Portland Alliance, Indie Media, World trade Organization, Iraq War, Occupy Wall Street, Livermore Action Group, etc.

Lee, Bette

Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest Oral Histories

  • Mss 2988-SR
  • Collection
  • 2000 - 2013

The Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN) was established in Portland, Oregon, by Tom Cook in the early 1990s. Since then the organization has collected archival materials and oral histories from organizations and individuals active in lesbian and gay issues in the Portland area and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Many of these oral histories were gathered by Portland State University students, from the late 90s to present.

Oral history interview with Edward Leavy

This oral history interview with Edward Leavy was conducted by Clark Hansen in Leavy's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse (known as the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse) in Portland, Oregon, from March 2 to April 13, 2004. The portion of the interview conducted on March 30, 2004 (Tapes 10 through 12) appears to have been simultaneously recorded on audiocassette and video. In the audio recording, the parties make reference to the video recording, which is not included in this collection.

In this interview, Leavy discusses his family background and early life on a hops farm in Butteville, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending the University of Portland and studying at Notre Dame Law School, including his reasons for attending Catholic schools. He also speaks about how his faith informs his morality and judicial decisions, particularly regarding the Fifth Amendment. He discusses serving as a deputy district attorney for Lane County and some of the cases he prosecuted. He reflects at length upon the byzantine workings of the justice system, its strengths and weaknesses, and a judge's role within it.

Leavy discusses his election to the positions of Lane County District Court judge and Circuit Court judge, as well as the elections of other judges in Oregon. He talks about some of the cases he heard and some decisions of his that were reversed. He speaks at length about many of the judges he knew, including Ted Goodwin and Otto Skopil. He discusses the differences between state and federal courts. Leavy describes the magistrate system during the years he was a U.S. Magistrate for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He then speaks at length about mediating cases and reaching settlements. He discusses some controversial issues he's had to rule on, including drug use, the death penalty, and abortion. He also speaks briefly about his family life.

Leavy discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, beginning with his appointment by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. He discusses some of the cases he heard, including on Rajneeshpuram. He describes the various duties of federal judges; the processes and procedures of the Court of Appeals; and how it differs from the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his experience as a senior judge on the Court of Appeals since 1997, including mediating for U.S. v. Wen Ho Lee. He then talks about serving on the Surveillance Court of Review from 2001 to 2008, including the history and duties of that court. He also talks about writing opinions, his staff and law clerks, and the workload on the Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by discussing his thoughts on the trend of civil penalties in lieu of criminal, and concerns about the right to privacy.

Leavy, Edward, 1929-

Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

  • SR 1936
  • Collection
  • 1999-09-27 - 2001-06-01

This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

Mackenzie, Barbara A. (Barbara Amanda), 1905-2002

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