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Portrait of Roscoe Dixon

A bust portrait of Roscoe Dixon. He is wearing a light-colored striped suit and has a handlebar moustache. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Roscoe Lee Dixon. Owner of Roscoe's Oyster House, Astoria, Oreg. Born in 1843. born in Richmond, Va. Sent by Underground Railroad to New Bedford, Mass. Later came west with part of the family and lived in Astoria until Railroad came to Portland, lost their business & moved to Seattle. 1 son- Chester Dixon born in Astoria about 1881?" The photograph is a copy print from an earlier photograph.

Portrait of Theresa Dixon

A three-quarter length portrait of Theresa Dixon. She is standing with one arm resting on a table beside a vase of flowers. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Theresa Antoinette Townes (Brown). Born in Macon, GA in 1858. Arrived by boat in Astoria. Was given by Sea Captain & daughter. Lived with them till the daughter married. Later married Roscoe Dixon. 1 son - Chester Dixon. Later 1 daughter - Mabel born in Seattle." The photograph is a copy print from an earlier photograph.

Portrait of Chester Ingersol Dixon

A full-length portrait of Chester Ingersol Dixon as a young child. He is seated on a tricycle and is wearing a light-colored play dress and a wide-brimmed black hat. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Chester Ingersoll Dixon, born in Astoria, OR."

California Gallery (Astoria, Or.)

Oral history interview with Robert F. Smith

This oral history interview with Robert F. Smith was conducted by Clark Hansen at Smith's office in Medford, Oregon, from August 30 to September 1, 1995. In this interview, Smith discusses his family background and early life in Burns, Oregon. He talks about his interest in basketball while attending Willamette University. He also talks about running a ranch and multiple other businesses after graduation; his flying hobby; and his involvement with a number of civic organizations. He goes on to talk about being recruited to run for the Oregon Legislature by members of the Oregon Republican Party, and his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1960 to 1973. He discusses his campaigns, committees, fellow legislators, and legislation that he worked on. He talks about Tony Yturri, Monte Montgomery, Bill Holmstrom, Stan Ouderkirk, Clarence Barton, and Stafford Hansell. He discusses legislation on agriculture, taxes, labor, forestry and land use. He also talks about how his leadership style as speaker of the House from 1969 to 1973, and about his legislative agenda. He closes the interview by discussing the social life of legislators.

Smith, Robert F. (Robert Freeman), 1931-

Oral history interview with Frankie Bell

This oral history interview with Frankie Bell was conducted by Vinita Howard from November 12-30, 1992. In this interview, Bell discusses her family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon. She discusses her education and attending the University of Oregon. She talks about the difficulty of starting a family while still attending college and trying to have a career. She discusses the various part-time jobs she held until she began working at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, in 1966 as a tour guide. She talks about working at the information desk at the Oregon Legislature from 1967 to the time of the interview in 1992, including facing sexism on the job. She describes her observations on the Legislature over her two and a half decades there, including on lobbyists, rumors, and inaugural changes. She also talks about the history of the Capitol building, as well as organizing holidays and exhibits at the building; the gift shop; and school tours. She closes the interview by speaking briefly about the personalities of many legislators over the years.

Bell, Frankie (Frances Estelle), 1937-

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

This oral history interview with Cecil Edwards was conducted by Irvin Luiten from May 18 to 26, 1988. In the interview, Edwards discusses his family history and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his education and early interest in government. He then talks about his experiences working for the Oregon Legislature beginning in 1933. He discusses the old Capitol building, which burned down in 1935; campaigns he worked on, and the role of lobbyists. He also talks about working as secretary for Governor Charles Sprague. Edwards then describes his service in the National Guard during World War II, particularly working with horses and dogs. He talks about returning to work in Oregon government after the war ended, including serving on the Racing Commission; being fired by Governor Mark Hatfield; lobbying for the Oregon Cattlemen's Association; and returning to the Legislature to work as a secretary. He discusses the numerous committees he was secretary for, including the agriculture committee, fish and game committee, and land-use board. Edwards next discusses his tenure as secretary of the Senate from 1965 to 1975, focusing on many of the legislators he worked with, including Clarence Barton, Debbs Potts, and Jason Boe. He also speaks at length about redistricting, as well as the duties of the secretary of the Senate and Senate rules.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman

This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman's offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield's staff; discusses other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and talks about how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator's stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield's personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration's push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield's efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield's real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield's political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Edward Leavy

This oral history interview with Edward Leavy was conducted by Clark Hansen in Leavy's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse (known as the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse) in Portland, Oregon, from March 2 to April 13, 2004. The portion of the interview conducted on March 30, 2004 (Tapes 10 through 12) appears to have been simultaneously recorded on audiocassette and video. In the audio recording, the parties make reference to the video recording, which is not included in this collection.

In this interview, Leavy discusses his family background and early life on a hops farm in Butteville, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending the University of Portland and studying at Notre Dame Law School, including his reasons for attending Catholic schools. He also speaks about how his faith informs his morality and judicial decisions, particularly regarding the Fifth Amendment. He discusses serving as a deputy district attorney for Lane County and some of the cases he prosecuted. He reflects at length upon the byzantine workings of the justice system, its strengths and weaknesses, and a judge's role within it.

Leavy discusses his election to the positions of Lane County District Court judge and Circuit Court judge, as well as the elections of other judges in Oregon. He talks about some of the cases he heard and some decisions of his that were reversed. He speaks at length about many of the judges he knew, including Ted Goodwin and Otto Skopil. He discusses the differences between state and federal courts. Leavy describes the magistrate system during the years he was a U.S. Magistrate for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He then speaks at length about mediating cases and reaching settlements. He discusses some controversial issues he's had to rule on, including drug use, the death penalty, and abortion. He also speaks briefly about his family life.

Leavy discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, beginning with his appointment by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. He discusses some of the cases he heard, including on Rajneeshpuram. He describes the various duties of federal judges; the processes and procedures of the Court of Appeals; and how it differs from the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his experience as a senior judge on the Court of Appeals since 1997, including mediating for U.S. v. Wen Ho Lee. He then talks about serving on the Surveillance Court of Review from 2001 to 2008, including the history and duties of that court. He also talks about writing opinions, his staff and law clerks, and the workload on the Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by discussing his thoughts on the trend of civil penalties in lieu of criminal, and concerns about the right to privacy.

Leavy, Edward, 1929-

Oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab

This oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab was conducted by John C. Beatty on January 17, 1994. In this interview, Schwab discusses his early life in Portland, Oregon. He discusses his early jobs and attending Northwestern College of Law. He also talks about his service in the U.S. Army Reserves in India during World War II under General George E. Stratemeyer. He then talks about practicing law in Portland from 1947 to 1959. He briefly discusses his other activities during that time, including serving on the Portland School Board. He talks about serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He briefly describes his fellow judges. He goes on to talk about his activities since his retirement in 1980, including serving on the Northwest Power Planning Council and as mayor of Cannon Beach. He closes the interview by talking about Governor Bob Straub, Monroe Sweetland, Dorothy McCullough Lee and Dick Neuberger.

Schwab, Herbert M., 1915-2005

Oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave

This oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave was conducted by Timothy J. Coleman on November 26, 1993. In this interview, Cosgrave discusses his family background and early life in Calaveras County, California, including his education, childhood games, and the experience of being the son of the county sheriff. He the talks about moving to the San Francisco Bay Area and attending high school. He briefly discusses coming to Oregon and getting interested in the law.

Cosgrave, Walter J. (Walter John), 1910-1999

Oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer

This oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer was conducted by Clark Hansen at Frohnmayer's office in Medford, Oregon, from November 28 to December 1, 1989. In this interview, Frohnmayer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including facing anti-German sentiment during World War I, his education, and vacations to Seaside. He discusses working in hotels and attending the University of Oregon, including his social life and studying law. He then talks about his early law practice in Medford. He also talks about the effects of the Depression and World War II on the Medford area. He briefly describes some of the judges he argued before. He speaks at length about notable cases he worked on, as well as changes in laws over the 20th century. He then talks about his wife, MarAbel Fisher Braden, and their family life. He talks about the politics involved in judicial appointments; jury trials; and the profession of law. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

Frohnmayer, Otto J. (Otto John), 1905-2000

Oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson

This oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson was conducted by Jeffrey C. Dobbins in Salem, Oregon, from August 21 to December 11, 2007. Throughout the interview, Peterson refers to photographs and letters. Copies of some, but not all, of these items are included in the related U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society collection, Coll 560.

In this interview, Peterson discusses his family background in Gilmanton, Wisconsin, including the local creamery managed by his father; his childhood activities; and his early education. He also talks about his memories of rural life during World War II. He discusses having asthma and moving to Oregon in 1944 in an effort to improve his health, as well as his high school experience in Eugene. He talks about studying music at the University of Oregon, including his social life, his summer activities, and his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes his service as a personnel officer in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, particularly his experience in administration. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon law school, including the dean, Orlando Hollis; his social life; and his summer jobs. He talks about relocating to Portland to practice law at Tooze, Kerr, Peterson, Marshall & Shenker. He speaks at length about the practice of law, as well as some of the cases he tried, some of his fellow lawyers, and judges he argued before. He particularly focuses on trial preparation and procedures. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, and his friendship with Clay Myers.

Peterson discusses serving on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993. He talks about his appointment by Governor Vic Atiyeh. He describes his fellow judges on the Supreme Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He also shows Dobbins his collection of photographs and speaks about them at length. He discusses the procedures of the Supreme Court, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election in 1980. He talks about serving as chief justice from 1983 to 1991, including implementing an integrated court system, the court's budget, and the court's staff. He reads entries from his journals detailing this part of his career. He also discusses the changes in technology, rules of professionalism, and diversity training. He closes the interview by talking about his activities since retiring in 1993, including teaching at the Willamette University law school and working as a mediator.

Peterson, Edwin J. (Edwin Junior), 1930-

H. J. Heinz Company truck

Photograph, taken from the side, showing an H. J. Heinz Company truck (1930 White) parked in the street outside a Heinz building, possibly at 371 Front Street in Portland. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Fire Truck on its Side After Sling Gives Way

An American LaFrance Type O-10 fire truck lies on its side between a ship and a dock. The truck fell on its side after a sling that was loading it onto the ship "Oregon" gave way at Terminal #1. A man kneels and looks at the firetruck. The Broadway Bridge and Steel Bridge are visible in the distant background on the Willamette River (negative 2 of 11).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Carstens Packing Company, Front Street, Portland

Photograph, taken from across the street, showing a truck parked outside a three-story brick building at 105 Front Street between Stark and Washington in downtown Portland. A sign on the front of the building reads “Carstens Packing Co.” A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Original home of Ladd & Tilton Bank on Front Street / The first two stories were Portland’s first brick building / Built in 1853.” Wharton reported that the third story had been added later. See related image Nos. 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy

Oral history interview with John G. Wyers [Sessions 3 & 4]

Reel 1, Side 2. In the third interview session, conducted on March 12, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived near the White Salmon River in the late 19th century, including the areas now known as Trout Lake and Glenwood. In the fourth interview session, conducted on March 21, 1959, Wyers talks about the schools, churches, and roads in western Klickitat County in the late 19th century.

Wyers, John G. (John Gerbrand), 1871-1961

Oral history interview with John G. Wyers

  • SR 2097
  • Collection
  • 1959-03-03 - 1959-03-21

This oral history interview with John G. Wyers was conducted by his son, Teunis J. Wyers, from March 3-21, 1959. The interview was conducted in four sessions. An unidentified woman was also present during the first session.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 3, 1959, Wyers discusses settling in the Klickitat County, Washington, area in 1891. He talks about the people who lived in the areas now known as White Salmon and Underwood in the late 19th century. He describes a ferry, the landscape, and buildings in the area.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 5, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived in the western area of Klickitat County in the late 19th century. He also speaks about conflicts between white emigrants and Native people who lived in the area.

In the third interview session, conducted on March 12, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived near the White Salmon River in the late 19th century, including the areas now known as Trout Lake and Glenwood.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on March 21, 1959, Wyers talks about the schools, churches, and roads in western Klickitat County in the late 19th century.

Wyers, John G. (John Gerbrand), 1871-1961

Oral history interview with John G. Wyers [Sessions 1 & 2]

Reel 1, Side 1. In the first interview session, conducted on March 3, 1959, Wyers discusses settling in the Klickitat County, Washington, area in 1891. He talks about the people who lived in the areas now known as White Salmon and Underwood in the late 19th century. He describes a ferry, the landscape, and buildings in the area. In the second interview session, conducted on March 5, 1959, Wyers talks about the people who lived in the western area of Klickitat County in the late 19th century. He also speaks about conflicts between white emigrants and Native people who lived in the area.

Wyers, John G. (John Gerbrand), 1871-1961

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse [Session 03]

Tape 3, Side 1. In the third and final interview session, conducted on February 20, 1991, Buse revisits the topic of her marriage to Herman Richard Buse and raising a family in West Linn. She talks about camping with her family, shares the history of places and landmarks in West Linn, and describes how the city has changed over her life. She closes the interview by talking about the Romani people who would come to West Linn in the summers.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse [Session 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. In the first interview session, conducted on January 15, 1991, Buse discusses her family background and childhood in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her elementary school education, and her recreational activities. She describes life in West Linn during the early 20th century and talks about attending Territorial Days picnics.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse [Session 02, Recording 02]

Tape 2, Side 2. In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1991, Buse discusses her teenage years in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her high school education, and her recreational activities. She talks about her wedding and marriage to Herman Richard Buse. She discusses raising a family in West Linn, and talks about family and holiday traditions; shares her memories of her activities during World War II; and talks about her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about her health, about her involvement in clubs and organizations, and about growing vegetables. She also revisits the topic of her childhood and describes the foods she ate, the process of doing laundry, and the clothes she wore.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse

  • SR 1713
  • Collection
  • 1991-01-15 - 1991-02-20

This oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse was conducted by Susan L. Smith in West Linn, Oregon, from January 15 to February 20, 1991. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 15, 1991, Buse discusses her family background and childhood in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her elementary school education, and her recreational activities. She describes life in West Linn during the early 20th century and talks about attending Territorial Days picnics.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1991, Buse discusses her teenage years in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her high school education, and her recreational activities. She talks about her wedding and marriage to Herman Richard Buse. She discusses raising a family in West Linn, and talks about family and holiday traditions; shares her memories of her activities during World War II; and talks about her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about her health, about her involvement in clubs and organizations, and about growing vegetables. She also revisits the topic of her childhood and describes the foods she ate, the process of doing laundry, and the clothes she wore.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on February 20, 1991, Buse revisits the topic of her marriage to Herman Richard Buse and raising a family in West Linn. She talks about camping with her family, shares the history of places and landmarks in West Linn, and describes how the city has changed over her life. She closes the interview by talking about the Romani people who would come to West Linn in the summers.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse [Session 02, Recording 01]

Tape 2, Side 1. In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1991, Buse discusses her teenage years in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her high school education, and her recreational activities. She talks about her wedding and marriage to Herman Richard Buse. She discusses raising a family in West Linn, and talks about family and holiday traditions; shares her memories of her activities during World War II; and talks about her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about her health, about her involvement in clubs and organizations, and about growing vegetables. She also revisits the topic of her childhood and describes the foods she ate, the process of doing laundry, and the clothes she wore.

Buse, Zennah M. (Zennah Marguerite), 1904-1994

Oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford [Session 02, Recording 01]

Tape 3, Side 1. In the second interview session, conducted on December 18, 1987, Crawford, Bleakney, and an unidentified woman drive and walk around The Dalles and talk about the history of the land, animals, roads, and buildings as they pass. They also walk along the Dalles Mountain Ranch Loop Hike and talk about the history of the area. Crawford then speaks about his life on a ranch in The Dalles. He also shares his memories of Celilo Falls before it was flooded by The Dalles Dam.

Crawford, Malcolm M. (Malcolm Moody), 1899-1992

Oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford [Session 02, Recording 03]

Tape 4, Side 1. In the second interview session, conducted on December 18, 1987, Crawford, Bleakney, and an unidentified woman drive and walk around The Dalles and talk about the history of the land, animals, roads, and buildings as they pass. They also walk along the Dalles Mountain Ranch Loop Hike and talk about the history of the area. Crawford then speaks about his life on a ranch in The Dalles. He also shares his memories of Celilo Falls before it was flooded by The Dalles Dam.

Crawford, Malcolm M. (Malcolm Moody), 1899-1992

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