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Oral History Interview with Bette Lee, by Sandy Polishuk [Transcript]

Transcript. Bette Lee discusses her activism and career in photographing protests, beginning in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1980s, and later in Portland, Oregon. She discusses several specific photographs, many of which can be found in the transcript. Protests and movements discussed include the Portland Alliance, Indie Media, World trade Organization, Iraq War, Occupy Wall Street, Livermore Action Group, etc.

Lee, Bette

Oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave

This oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave was conducted by Timothy J. Coleman on November 26, 1993. In this interview, Cosgrave discusses his family background and early life in Calaveras County, California, including his education, childhood games, and the experience of being the son of the county sheriff. He the talks about moving to the San Francisco Bay Area and attending high school. He briefly discusses coming to Oregon and getting interested in the law.

Cosgrave, Walter J. (Walter John), 1910-1999

Oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada

This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon.

In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

Yada, Tatsuro, 1916-2003

Jerry Jiro Yasutome photographs

  • Org. Lot 762
  • Collection
  • 1945-1948

This collection consists of photographs of the Yasutome family, a Japanese-American family from Portland, Oregon, taken from 1945 to 1948. Most of the photographs were taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome; a smaller number were created by other members of the Yasutome family and by unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, where Jerry Yasutome studied from approximately 1946 to 1948. Photographs taken by Jerry Yasutome and other family members document their experiences during incarceration at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California from 1945 to 1946. These images include portraits of the Yasutome family, including Jerry Yasutome’s son, James Mamoru Yasutome, and his parents, Sadao Kurata Yasutome and Ju Jiro Yasutome; group portraits of electrical workers and a Buddhist Sunday School; and photos of a fire at the Tule Lake high school. The remainder of the photographs in the collection represent the work of students at the Northwest School of Photography. They include photographs of the processing lab and students in classes, as well as portraits taken by the students. Also included are photographs taken by Yasutome and other students depicting the aftermath of the Vanport Flood in May 1948.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Tule Lake photographs

Photographs taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other members of the Yasutome family documenting their time at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California. These images include portraits of the Yasutome family, including Jerry Yasutome’s son, James Mamoru Yasutome, and his parents, Sadao Kurata Yasutome and Ju Jiro Yasutome; group portraits of electrical workers and a Buddhist Sunday School; and photos of a fire at the center. Between 1942 and 1946 the Yasutome family was incarcerated by the United States government at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California. The Tule Lake Relocation Center was one of ten American concentration camps to which Japanese Americans were forcibly removed and incarcerated during World War II. The Yasutomes' son, James Mamoru Yasutome was born at Tule Lake in 1943.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Articles

Newspaper clippings discussing the need for antelope conservation at Hart Mountain, the impact of birds on the fish population, and restoration of the Lower Klamath Lake. Article discussing "Birds, bergs and Kodiak bears" lecture is included.

Oregon Journal (Firm)

Documents discussing Oregon and northern California refuges

Documents focus primarily on the destruction of bird nesting sites through the careless practices of the Reclamation Service, including prescribed burning and leasing of land for grazing. Other topics include cooperation between the Reclamation Service and Biological Survey, duck hunting, and recommendations for restoring refuges to ideal nesting conditions. A map of the Klamath Irrigation Project is included.

United States. Bureau of Reclamation

Wholesale waterfowl destruction in the Klamath Country

Manuscript discusses how the waterfowl in Klamath country are now protected from hunters by game laws. The Bureau of Reclamation destroyed areas of sanctuary for waterfowl because the demand for land for agricultural use was so high. According to Dr. C. F. Marbut from the Department of Agriculture, the soil from the land in and around the bed of the Lower Klamath Lake could not support agricultural means successfully. Instead, the area became a refuge similar to Clear Lake.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Correspondence and news releases

Correspondence discussing the Malheur Lake Wildlife Refuge and dam construction on the Klamath River in California. News releases describing William Finley's life and lectures are included.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Cats have no respect for game laws

Manuscript that ponders whether or not it is justified to exterminate cats that are disrupting a wildlife refuge. The author and Mr. Fairchild observed a trio of cats that caused a bit of mayhem by hunting birds in the refuge.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Records of ducks over baited waters

Manuscript that delves into the game records for duck hunting, finding that the two states with the largest number of birds bagged were permitted to use bait. The author explains that the reason why there was such a concentration of birds in California and Illinois, is that they lie on the most naturally attractive waterways. Other states are mentioned, but the main focus is on California and Illinois. The document goes on to say that the practice of baiting creates an unfair advantage and those that do not bait tend to later follow after seeing the baiters' success. The federal government banned the use of bait in respects to duck hunting.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Sanctuaries for waterfowl

Manuscript that champions the idea of additional sanctuaries for birds and animals. The document mentions what efforts President Theodore Roosevelt made before retiring from office. The document also highlights a number of refuges in the United States.

Averill, Edgar F., 1881-1955

Klamath waterfowl mat stage a good comeback

Manuscript that relays the struggle of farmers and land owners versus the Reclamation Services in respects to the lake beds in the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake areas. It was recognized that the drying of the beds is destructive to the local waterfowl because of a lack of a reliable water source. For the farmers and land owners, they would rather see the land as a place of cultivation. The Reclamation Service believed that only a small part could realistically be kept under cultivation. Part of the area in question became a sump and instead of using all of the land for that purpose, a refuge area was set aside which became the Tule Lake Refuge.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The romance of swans sometimes goes haywire

Manuscript chronicling the failure of introducing two male swans to two female swans who had been companions for a few years. The author points out that partners should be introduced in the first two years of life as swans mate for life. After such a long period of association, the two birds became dependent upon each other for all types of companionship long before the males were introduced.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The American white pelican

Manuscript that focuses on the American white pelican, which according to this document, has an unattractive appearance. The document also describes how the pelican feeds its young.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Malheur, Lower Klamath Lake, and Hart Mountain Refuges, 1930-1935

Correspondence, articles drafts, and notes discussing the Malheur Lake and Lower Klamath Lake Refuges with a focus on the impact of agricultural projects on the reservations, including water shortages and pollution. Additional topics include concerns about an antelope population limit at the Hart Mountain Game Refuge and the introduction of non-native species to replace dwindling native bird and fish populations.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Trip to eastern United States, 1927-1928

Overview of William and Irene Finley's trip to the eastern United States, including Finley's recent publication, "Wild Animal Pets", release of a film series, "Finley Nature Series", and series of lectures, "Camera Hunting on the Continental Divide" and "Cruising in B.C. and Alaska."

Finley, Irene

Lower Klamath Lake, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake Refuges, 1917-1935

Correspondence, reports, and articles discussing the impact of agriculture and reclamation projects on the Lower Klamath, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake Refuges. Topics of focus include the impacts of grazing on bird refuges, construction of dikes and dams on the Klamath and Link Rivers, and possible reflooding of portions of the Lower Klamath Lake.

Finley, Irene

Gull habits

Manuscript describing gull behavior, including diet and appearance.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Klamath trip

Manuscript detailing lake trips. Document goes on to describe physical characteristics such as length and plant life, as well as detailing the search for white herons. The author is disappointed to learn that the area was one of the most popular plumage hunting sites.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

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