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Portrait of Francesca Reinig Dekum

A cabinet card photograph of Francesca Reinig Dekum in a wood frame. She wears a dark dress with fabric-covered buttons and a ruffled collar. She has a plaid scarf tied at her neck. The caption on the back of the photograph reads, "From Mss 535, Francesca Reinig Dekum, wife of Frank Dekum. Died, Portland, Oregon, 1872-3. Born nr. Heidelberg, Germany (ap. 1830)." Note: genealogical records indicate that Dekum was born in about 1840 and died in 1878.

Buchtel & Stolte

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 04]

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 05]

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 02]

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 03]

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 01]

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd

This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Portland, circa 1857

Photograph of Portland, Oregon taken by Lorenzo Lorain between 1857 and 1858. There is a hewn-log cabin with a brick chimney and covered porch in the foreground. The cabin is surrounded by a field filled with stumps. Portland and the Willamette River are visible in the distance. The typed caption glued below the bristol board on the front of the photograph reads, "Portland, Oregon. 1857 or 1858. Taken By Lorenzo Lorain, U. S. A. Donated to Oregon Historical Society, 1946, by S. H. Lorain, Albany, Oregon." Handwritten captions on the back of the page read, "Portland, Oregon. Taken by Lt. Lorenzo Lorain, U.S.A. in 1857 or 1858. He Made his camera, prepared his plates, as well as the paper on which the print is made." and, "Portland, from south end, at about the foot of College Street."

Lorain, Lorenzo

Portland, 1857

View of First Street in Portland, Oregon, in 1857 attributed to Lorenzo Lorain. The photograph shows the Union Hotel, Monnastes & David foundry, and Hop Wo Washing & Ironing. Several horse-drawn wagons are on the unpaved street in front of the buildings. Several men stand around large metal pieces in front of the foundry. A handwritten caption on the back of the photograph reads, "Portland, 1857. West side of First Street, between Yamhill and Morrison, showing the foundry owned by Monnastes & David, and the Union Hotel."

Lorain, Lorenzo

Flowers family automotive sales lot

A view of a commercial car lot operated by the Flowers Company from approximately 1939-1955. There are several cars parked in two lines on a gravel lot. The automotive repair garage also operated by the Flowers family is visible in the background of the photograph. A handwritten caption on the back of the photograph reads, "Flowers family car lot at garage. 2125 N. Vancouver."

Flowers Auto Repair garage

Ralph Flowers, Ruth Flowers, and an unidentified man stand in front of the Flowers Auto Repair garage. There is a black car parked in front of the open service door. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "2125 N. Vancouver Ave. Portland. Ralph & Ruth Flowers."

Flowers family on a horse-drawn wagon

A photograph of seven people seated in or standing beside a horse-drawn wagon on the Flowers family farm near Mt. Scott in Southeast Portland. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "On the farm. Leaving for picnic on the Clackamas River. Flowers Farm, Lents."

Flowers family jitney bus full of passengers

A photograph of the jitney bus operated by the Flowers family filled with passengers. Several people are seated in the bus and a small group stands in front of the bus. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Flowers family jitney. Back row standing: Jan Minor, Almas Morrow, Lloyd Flowers. Seated far left of jitney, the Paynes. Woman standing in jitney, Mrs. Allen."

Flowers brothers with hunting rifles

A photograph of the Flowers brothers with friends. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph identifies the people in the photographs from left to right as: Ervin Flowers. Elmer Flowers, Vassie Cash, Lee Hankins, and Ralph Flowers. Ervin Flowers and Ralph Flowers each hold a hunting rifle. A dog and a stuffed pheasant lay on the ground in front of the group.

Ruth Flowers, Ralph Flowers, and Clifford Flowers with an automobile

A photograph of Ruth Flowers and Ralph Flowers with their son, Clifford Flowers. They are standing in front of an automobile in a residential neighborhood. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Ralph and Ruth Flowers and son in front of family residences, nos. 381, 383, 385, 387 NE 1st Ave, Portland."

Flowers family farm

A photograph of a group of people standing in front of a tent on the Flowers family farm in the Lents neighborhood of Southeast Portland. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Allen Elmer [sic.] Flowers Farm on north slope of Mt. Scott. about 1895. Across from Lincoln Park Cemetery."

Ruth Flowers and Rose Scott at the Flowers farm in Lents

A photograph of Ruth Flowers and Rose Scott on the Flowers family farm near Mt. Scott in Southeast Portland. Ruth Flowers stands beside a dairy cow holding a lead rope. Rose Scott is kneeling by the cow's udder. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Ruth Flowers on the farm in Lents. Ruth Flowers & Rose Scott."

Portrait of Grandad Booth

A head and shoulders portrait of Grandad Booth. A handwritten caption on the back of the photograph reads, "Grandad Booth on mother side (Flowers family)."

New York Gallery (Portland, Or.)

Roscoe Dixon portrait

A head and shoulders portrait of Roscoe Dixon. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Roscoe Dixon, About 1880, Operated Roscoe's Oyster House in Astoria, Ore."

Buchtel, Joseph, 1830-1916

Allen Ervin Flowers portrait

A head and shoulders portrait of Allen Ervin Flowers. A handwritten note on the back of the photograph reads, "Father, Allen Ervin Flowers."

Buchtel & Stolte

Portrait of Elmer Allen Flowers as an infant

A full length portrait of Elmer Allen Flowers as an infant. He is wearing a long white gown and is laying on a chair covered in a striped blanket. A handwritten caption on the back of the photograph reads, "Elmer Allen Flowers, 4 months & three weeks old."

Yocum, Oliver Cooper, 1842-1928

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