Showing 5934 results

Collections
Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953 With digital objects
Print preview View:

What is a ring-tailed cat?

Manuscript that delves into the perplexing animal that is ring-tailed cat or ringtail. A cousin of the raccoon, the animal can be found in the southwestern part of the Americas from Mexico to southern Oregon. The animal has a strange appearance and prefers to hunt mice and small game. The animal is an omnivore and emits a musky smell.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Family cares divided by grosbeaks

A manuscript that comments on the peculiarity of the divided workload between a pair of grosbeaks in feeding their offspring. The author noticed that both parents took care of the nestlings, but on alternate days. Generally, other species of birds the parents feed side by side, but not in the case of the grosbeak.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The storehouse of the red squirrel

In this manuscript we see the return of Piney the squirrel and the author observes that Piney and his fellow squirrels differ from other squirrels. They are different because unlike the other species of squirrels, they are vigilant in up keeping their supply of food. Piney took over a bird house near the author's property and it was discovered that Piney had collected one hundred and forty-six nuts. The author wonders if this store of food will be utilized and emptied by the time the birds arrive to occupy the bird house.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Hawks that check the rodent pests

Manuscript arguing that red-tailed hawks are beneficial to the environment, not detrimental as sportsmen and farmers would have the public believe. Farmers assume that the hawk is after livestock. Sportsmen blame the hawk for the decrease of other bird and game populations. The author contends that these birds help aid the natural balance of their ecosystem. They help weed out rodents that destroy crops.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The gull bread line

Manuscript that describes a conversation between the author and a young man who is a member of the Audubon Society. The author and man observe how many people do not take the time to feed the birds. The author later reflects that people such as naturalists and Audubon members do not need endless amounts of free time, they are just as busy and productive as other members of society. It is that they desire to enjoy their lives and take pleasure in taking time to experience life.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Hunting warblers with field glasses and camera

Short manuscript focusing on photographing a sometimes elusive subject, the warbler. The author describes the experience of photographing a pair of the birds. It was learned not to trust the mother as she faked an injury in order to distract attention from her nest.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The chickaree

This manuscript describes the author's interaction with a pine squirrel. The squirrel is compared to the other types of squirrels that are present in that area.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Renting houses for songs

Manuscript of "Renting houses for songs." The document explores the unintentional restructuring of habitats for birds. With additional people purchasing land that previously housed birds, the birds are finding themselves in close contact with human habitats. Additionally, other species not native to the land have been introduced and are taking housing from the native bird populations.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Razor clams on the Oregon coast just a memory

Manuscript that is written as a story, where two men have a conversation at a gas station. One is a tourist, the other the gas service man. The tourist is excited to consume some of the local razor clam but the service man explains that the clams are gone. Due to the high demand and the disregard for preserving the population were the causes of its decline.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Nothing a duck hunter likes better than ducks

This appears to be a rough draft of "Nothing a duck hunter likes better than ducks." Small differences include the additional sentences and above the title in faint pencil 'Consider the poor old duck hunter'.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Paved highways and good trout stream do not mix

This manuscript rallies against building paved roads along streams because this creates easy access and an opening to abuse the resources found in the stream. This document focuses mainly on overfishing in regards to the trout population. Later in the document, the author argues against a highway being built along the Rogue River because this will negatively affect the stream, both in health and fish populations.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The mountain beaver is not a beaver

Manuscript explaining that the rodent known as the mountain beaver, in fact is not a beaver, nor is it related to any animal. It is animal that is found only along the west coast of the United States. The document gives the physical description of the animal and where one might be spotted in Oregon.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Best trout stream and trout surveys

Two manuscripts are featured in this document. The first discusses how the Deschutes River is an ideal place for trout, not only for sport but for the fish to inhabit. The river benefits from the lack of silt in the water and protection from dumping pollutants. Also due to a lack of a paved road, access is limited to the area. The second manuscript discusses the importance of conducting surveys that determine what makes a place suitable for a fish to inhabit. Factors such as what are the food sources and water temperature are to be considered. The writer makes the point that one cannot gauge from mere visual observation the amount of fish in any given stream. To truly determine the population, in depth surveys must be done.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Trout flies

This manuscript appears to be an edited version of "Trout flies".

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Sportsmen kill the goose that lays the golden egg

Manuscript discussing the alarming state of the decline of local animal and fish populations. The author contends that it is a combination of exhausting the local population for sport and introducing foreign populations of animals and fish to satisfy the demand for game to hunt. The document proposes that there are two points in a plan of action in order to restore native populations. The first is to enforce the laws of protection for the animals and fish, and the second is to educate in order to support wildlife resources.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Wholesale waterfowl destruction in the Klamath Country

Manuscript discusses how the waterfowl in Klamath country are now protected from hunters by game laws. The Bureau of Reclamation destroyed areas of sanctuary for waterfowl because the demand for land for agricultural use was so high. According to Dr. C. F. Marbut from the Department of Agriculture, the soil from the land in and around the bed of the Lower Klamath Lake could not support agricultural means successfully. Instead, the area became a refuge similar to Clear Lake.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The friendly robin

The manuscript begins by explaining that the robin is the most recognized and familiar of North American birds. The document explains the preferred habitat and diet of the bird. Then it continues with an examination of robins on the author's property.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Trout flies

According to R.E. Dimick from the Oregon State Agricultural College, the stonefly is a cornerstone in the diet of trout. The manuscript advises that a wise angler will observe the insects of an area to lead them to the best fishing spots. The document goes on to describe the life cycle of the stonefly as well as mentioning another type of stonefly, and where the author has found their population to be abundant.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The white-crowned sparrow

Manuscript where one species of sparrow is featured. The document begins with explaining that only an expert can distinguish the three varieties of this sparrow.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Song-bird population

This manuscript begins with how to attract songbirds to one's home, including the removal of predators, flora to interact with, and a water source. The author comments that there has been a noticed absence of some of the typical visitors to their property. Essentially, there has been a decline in population in some of the songbird species, such as wrens. Speculation for the source of this decline includes either disease or mishap during migration.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Waterfowl protection and other manuscripts

Manuscript that is composed of various manuscripts, with a focus on closing the waterfowl hunting season. The manuscripts concerning the waterfowl include creating legislation to close or limit the hunting season, the practice of baiting, and protecting waterfowl populations. A manuscript discussing russet-backed thrushes is included.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Sleeping off the winter

Manuscript discusses discovering a gray digger squirrel who appeared to be deceased but was actually hibernating and nearly frozen. This leads the author to write about the animal's process in preparing for its winter slumber. The document goes on to comment on other animals that hibernate as well and the differences in hibernation processes.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Results 141 to 168 of 5934