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Oregon. Legislative Assembly
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Oral history interview with Betty Roberts

This oral history interview with Betty Roberts was conducted by Katherine Huff O'Neil at Roberts' home in Portland, Oregon, from October 24 to November 16, 2005. In addition to the audio recording of the interview, the collection includes 50 digital photographs depicting Roberts' childhood, family, and later judicial career and activities. The collection also includes an index to the photographs.

In the interview, Roberts discusses her family background and early life in Texas, including her father's disability and the financial strain her family suffered during the Depression. She also talks about her early education, including playing on a girls football team. She talks about attending Texas Wesleyan College; meeting Bill Rice and their subsequent marriage; and moving to Southern Oregon in 1946. She describes raising a family, and returning to college late in life to pursue a teaching career. She then talks about getting involved in Democratic politics while attending Portland State University; the difficulty of balancing school, work, politics, and family; and her 1962 marriage to Frank Roberts. She also discusses some of the discrimination she faced due to her age and gender. She talks about studying law at Northwestern College of Law, including her professors and fellow students.

Roberts discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968. She talks about her experience as one of the few women in the Legislature, some of the legislation she worked on, and passing the Oregon bar in 1967. She talks about meeting Keith Skelton in the Legislature and their subsequent marriage in 1968. She then talks about serving in the Oregon Senate from 1969 to 1977. She describes the lack of a women's restroom in the Senate and other forms of discrimination she faced. She speaks at length about some of the legislation she worked on, particularly bills focusing on abortion and allowing married women to choose their names. She talks about other women legislators and the formation of the women's caucus in 1973, as well as much of the legislation on women's rights they worked on. She also discusses her committee assignments, practicing law in Portland while serving in the Legislature, and the formation of the Oregon Court of Appeals in 1977.

Roberts discussing serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1982. She discusses her appointment; her fellow judges, particularly Herb Schwab; and the sexism she faced. She then discusses serving as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1982 to 1986. She talks about her appointment, her fellow justices, and her experience as the first woman on the court. She also talks about some of the cases she heard and precedents set by her opinions. She then talks about her reasons for retiring in 1986, as well as her work as a mediator. Roberts and O'Neil close the interview by discussing the formation of Oregon Women Lawyers and some of that organization's activities.

Roberts, Betty, 1923-2011

Oral history interview with David S. Barrows

This oral history interview with David S. Barrows was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from January 31 to March 13, 2000. In this interview, Barrows discusses his family history and childhood in the San Francisco Bay Area of California and in Washington, D.C., as well as his high school education in California. He then talks about attending Willamette University, including having Mark Hatfield as a professor and mentor. Barrows discusses working as a page in the Oregon Legislature and his interest in a career as a lobbyist. He talks briefly about going to law school and practicing law. Barrows then talks about lobbying for the Fairview Home in the 1959 and 1961 legislative sessions, as well as his later lobbying work for tobacco wholesalers and the Oregon Savings and Loan League. His lobbying work included topics such sterilization, taxation, and financial regulations. He also talks about the history of Oregon and California Railroad Revested Lands and his lobbying for the Association of O & C Counties. He also speaks in great detail about legislative procedure, the rules regulating lobbyists, and the relationship between lobbyists and legislators. Barrows closes the interview with a discussion of his lobbying work on behalf of the Oregon Historical Society.

Barrows, David S. (David Stow), 1935-2014

Oral history interview with Norma Paulus

  • SR 3972
  • Collection
  • 1999-02-10 - 2000-11-02

This oral history interview with Norma Paulus was conducted by Clark Hansen at Paulus's home in Salem, Oregon, in Lincoln City, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon; and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from February 10, 1999, to November 2, 2000, and from February 10 to 27, 2010. In the interview, Paulus discusses her family background and early life in Burns, Oregon, including life during World War II and contracting polio at the age of 19. She also discusses working as a secretary for the Harney County district attorney, Leland Beckham; moving to Salem to work for a law firm; working for Judge Earl Latourette; and going to law school. Paulus describes meeting Bill Paulus while attending law school; his family background; and their marriage. Paulus discusses her involvement with the Republican Party; working as an appellate lawyer for the Oregon Supreme Court; working on Wally Carson's campaign for the Oregon Legislature in 1965; and getting her first political appointment, to the Marion County Boundary Commission, where she focused on land-use and city planning issues. She focuses on managing a career in law and politics while raising two young children and building a house.

She then discusses her time in the Oregon House of Representatives, from 1970 to 1976, including environmental issues such as the Bottle Bill of 1971 and recycling; education; the criminal code; taxes; attempts to make Cape Kiwanda a state park; and the Rajneeshees. Paulus goes into detail about the women's caucus and the bills they focused on for women's rights, as well as efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. She describes working with Bob Smith, Paul Hanneman, Betty Roberts, Stafford Hansell, Jack Anunsen, Wally Priestly, Dick Eymann, Lynn Newbry, Glenn Jackson, Jason Boe, and Gretchen Kafoury. She also talks about being co-chair for Clay Myers' 1974 race for Oregon governor.

Paulus goes on to speak about her time as Oregon's first woman secretary of state from 1977 to 1985, including her first campaign in 1976 against Blaine Whipple; her efforts to increase voter turnout; and conducting audits, particularly of the Forestry Department. She also discusses the secretary of state's role as state archivist and the conflict between the Oregon State Archives and the Oregon Historical Society over which records belong with which institution. She also discusses working with Governor Vic Atiyeh. Paulus discusses running for governor against Neil Goldschmidt in 1986 and the challenges her campaign faced. She discusses her position on the Northwest Power Planning Council from 1987 to 1990, including working with Ted Hallock and Bob Duncan. She also discusses her position as Oregon superintendent of public instruction from 1990 to 1999, including her efforts to fund K-12 education. Paulus also relates a story about sharing an airplane with Moshe Dayan.

Paulus, Norma

Oral history interview with L. Jean Markham

This oral history interview with L. Jean Markham was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on May 8, 1997. In this interview, Markham discusses her family background and early life in Washington, including her memories of the Depression and her high school education. She then talks about her experiences at a small community college and the University of Washington; her early political beliefs; and her relationship with William Edwin Markham, whom she married in 1943. She discusses starting a family and moving to Riddle, Oregon, in 1947; having polio when she was very young; her children's education; and her involvement in the Riddle community.

Markham discusses entering Republican politics with her husband, his service in the Oregon House of Representatives, and particularly her own work as his secretary. She describes the secretary orientation session, other legislative secretaries, and the expectations for freshman legislators. She describes her duties as a legislative secretary, including editing legislation by hand and handling correspondence, as well as her duties as a legislative aide. She also talks about the social lives of legislative secretaries, partisanship in the Legislature, and misconceptions the public has about the workings of Oregon government. She discusses Bill Markham's constituency, his position on several issues, and his temperament. She also talks about campaigning. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for retirement.

Markham, L. Jean (Lotus Jean), 1922-1998

Oral history interview with Wallace P. Carson, Jr.

This oral history interview with Wallace P. Carson, Jr. was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Oregon Supreme Court in Salem from June 12 to October 24, 1996. In the interview, Carson discusses his early life and childhood in Salem, including his memories of World War II. He also discusses his education, from elementary school to attending Stanford University and Willamette University Law School. He also discusses meeting his wife, Gloria Stolk, and his involvement with the Republican Party. Carson describes his 34-year military career in the Air Force and the Oregon National Guard, as both a pilot and a lawyer. He also talks about practicing law in Salem.

Carson then talks about his political career, beginning with his election to the Oregon House of Representatives in 1966. He discusses legislation on topics including taxes, particularly a sales tax; land use; education; and women's rights. Carson describes his time in the Oregon Senate, from 1970 to 1977, including his campaign, the Vietnam War, taxes, his relationship with the media, the criminal code, labor, utilities, and health care. He also discusses working with Oregon legislators and governors, including Tony Yturri, Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, Senate Secretary Cecil Edwards, Vic Atiyeh, Bob Straub, and Jason Boe.

Carson then discusses his experience on the Marion County Circuit Court from 1977 to 1982, including cases on medical malpractice. Carson next turns to his service on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1982 to 2006. He discusses cases he presided over on topics including capital punishment, mental illness, privacy, search and seizure, and elections. He also discusses the role of the chief justice, court procedure, and his interactions with attorneys. Carson discusses his fellow justices, including Betty Roberts, Jacob Tanzer, Arno Denecke, Hans Linde, and Mitch Gillette. He also discusses the history of penal systems, his re-election campaigns, and his home life.

Carson, Wallace P., Jr., 1934-

Oral history interview with Robert F. Smith

This oral history interview with Robert F. Smith was conducted by Clark Hansen at Smith's office in Medford, Oregon, from August 30 to September 1, 1995. In this interview, Smith discusses his family background and early life in Burns, Oregon. He talks about his interest in basketball while attending Willamette University. He also talks about running a ranch and multiple other businesses after graduation; his flying hobby; and his involvement with a number of civic organizations. He goes on to talk about being recruited to run for the Oregon Legislature by members of the Oregon Republican Party, and his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1960 to 1973. He discusses his campaigns, committees, fellow legislators, and legislation that he worked on. He talks about Tony Yturri, Monte Montgomery, Bill Holmstrom, Stan Ouderkirk, Clarence Barton, and Stafford Hansell. He discusses legislation on agriculture, taxes, labor, forestry and land use. He also talks about how his leadership style as speaker of the House from 1969 to 1973, and about his legislative agenda. He closes the interview by discussing the social life of legislators.

Smith, Robert F. (Robert Freeman), 1931-

Oral history interview with Ken Jernstedt

This oral history interview with Ken Jernstedt was conducted by Clark Hansen from February 23 to April 13, 1995, in Hood River, Oregon. In this interview, Jernstedt describes his family background and early life on a farm in Yamhill, Oregon, including growing up during the Depression and his education at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon. He also discusses his service during World War II, including his pilot training in the U.S. Marines aviation corps; joining the First American Volunteer Group and flying with the Flying Tigers for the Chinese Air Force; and his experience fighting against Japanese forces in China. He also talks about working as a test pilot after the war and meeting Charles Lindbergh. He then discusses returning to Oregon in 1946; purchasing Hood River Bottling Works; and his experiences as mayor of Hood River. Jernstedt also discusses his experiences in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1967 to 1968, including his campaign, party politics, and Monte Montgomery as speaker of the House. He then talks about his experiences in the Oregon Senate from 1969 to 1984, including legislation on taxation, particularly a sales tax; revisions to the criminal code; his objections to the 1971 Bottle Bill; liquor laws; and campaign finance. Other topics include prison labor, field burning, the expansion of the Capitol building, wage increases, elections, and the state's investments in apartheid South Africa. Jernstedt also speaks at length about Shree Bhagwan Rajneesh and his coming to the central Oregon town of Antelope in Jernstedt's legislative district. He also discusses working in the Senate with Ted Hallock, John D. Burns, Vic Atiyeh, Jason Boe, and John Kitzhaber. He also briefly talks about U.S. Senate Majority Leader Newt Gingrich.

Jernstedt, Ken (Kenneth Allen), 1917-2003

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

  • SR 3901
  • Collection
  • 1995-02-20

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Alfred Jones on behalf of the Marion County Historical Society in Salem, Oregon. The interview was held at Edwards' home in Salem on February 20, 1995. In this interview, Edwards discusses his family background, his early life and education in Salem, and his service in the National Guard. He also talks about his early involvement with the Oregon Legislature as a secretary, including an anecdote on the fire that destroyed the Capitol building in 1935. Edwards then discusses his activities after becoming chief clerk of the House of Representatives in 1963, and then secretary of the Senate in 1965. He also talks about some of the governors that he served under, as well as Abigail Scott Duniway and woman suffrage. He discusses landmark legislation, including the Bottle Bill; the state archives; and his interest in Arabian horses.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Vern Cook

This oral history interview with Robert Vernon "Vern" Cook was conducted by Clark Hansen at Cook's law office in Gresham, Oregon, and Cook's home in Troutdale, Oregon, from December 15, 1994, to October 15, 1995. In the interview, Cook discusses his family background and early life during the Depression in Las Animas, Colorado, and in Gresham. He also describes being a young man during World War II; being denied enlistment in the Navy due to polio; and his rehabilitation from polio. Cook discusses studying political science at Reed College and law at the University of Oregon, all while working concessions at various businesses in California with his brother. He talks about practicing law in Gresham; his involvement with the Democratic Party; and his first campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives in 1956. Cook discusses the legislation he worked on while serving in the House, including taxation, education, and worker's compensation. He also talks about serving on the judicial committee and related issues. He discusses some of the legislators he worked with, including Pat Dooley and Monroe Sweetland, as well as Governor Mark Hatfield.

Cook then describes his experience in the Oregon Senate, including serving on the judiciary committee and legislation on taxation, particularly sales taxes, as well as health insurance, education, land use, agriculture, domestic violence, and labor. He also talks about working with senators Tom Mahoney, Edith Green, Walter Pearson, Debbs Potts, Monte Montgomery, Alice Corbett, Ted Hallock, Jason Boe, and Vic Atiyeh. Cook also discusses party politics and its influence on the effectiveness of the Legislature during his tenure; the 1968 Democratic National Convention; and working with Governor Tom McCall and Portland Mayor Neil Goldschmidt. He also talks about his unsuccessful campaigns for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate; his involvement in Frank Church's campaign in the Democratic presidential primary in 1976; and the financial difficulties he faced as a legislator. He closes the interview by discussing his career as a lawyer since leaving the Legislature in 1980.

Cook, Vern (Robert Vernon), 1925-2008

Oral history interview with James A. Redden

This oral history interview with James A. Redden was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Redden's chambers at the U.S. District courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from November 30, 1994, to January 14, 2002. The audio is incomplete; Tape 27 is missing as of 2015.

In this interview, Redden discusses his family background and early life in Massachusetts, including his memories of the Depression. He then talks about his Army service in the Pacific theater during World War II. He discusses his college experience at the Boston University College of Business Administration and the Boston College Law School, including his social life, his professors, and the evolution of his political views. He also talks about his marriage to Joan Johnson; his jobs after law school; and relocating to Oregon. He discusses practicing law in Medford, including some of the cases he tried and judges he argued before. He then talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, including serving as central committee chair and his involvement in Oregon campaigns, particularly the 1960 Democratic presidential primary.

Redden discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1962 to 1969. He describes each legislative session, including his campaigns; legislation that came up, including on pollution, insurance, electrical utilities, and taxes; and his fellow legislators, including Clarence Barton, Monte Montgomery, and Berkeley Lent. He also talks about balancing his legislative duties with his law practice and family life; working with lobbyists; and national politics contemporary to the interview in 1995. He also talks about the passage of the Beach Bill in 1967; his experience as a delegate to the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois; and his 1972 campaign for Oregon treasurer. He discusses serving as state treasurer from 1972 to 1976, including his duties and accomplishments. He then discusses serving as Oregon attorney general from 1977 to 1980, including his campaign and cases he prosecuted, particularly on Native American fishing rights.

Redden discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1980 to 1995. He describes his appointment by President Jimmy Carter. He talks about his fellow judges, including Helen Frye and Owen Panner; the procedures of the court, particularly scheduling and the role of magistrate judges; and lawyers that argued before him. He discusses the selection and role of juries in federal court, as well as the increasing politicization of judicial appointments. He speaks at length about his role in and the background of The United States v. Loudhawk and the American Indian Movement. He closes the interview by discussing cases he heard regarding the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in the late 1990s, and talking about his children, their careers, and their families.

Redden, James A.

Oral history interview with Keith D. Skelton

This oral history interview with Keith D. Skelton was conducted by Clark Hansen at Skelton's home in Portland, Oregon, from November 9, 1994, to May 12, 1995. In this interview, Skelton discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Pennsylvania, including his early education and his memories of the Depression. He talks about attending Edinboro State Teachers College, including his summer jobs and social life. He talks about working for a zipper company after graduating, studying history at the University of Michigan, and dropping out to earn money as an insurance adjuster for Liberty Mutual in various cities around New England. He describes getting his draft notice in 1941 and his subsequent marriage to Ruth Ellen Blake. He describes the lead-up to World War II and his service in the U.S. Air Force from 1942 to 1945. He talks about his pilot training and service in the Pacific theater. He discusses the effect that his war experience had on his political beliefs; the difficulty of returning to civilian life; and relocating to Seattle, Washington, in 1947. He talks about attending the University of Washington Law School and his involvement with progressive political groups. He describes trying to find regular work in Seattle before relocating to Eugene, Oregon, in 1951 to begin his own law firm.

Skelton next discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party. He talks about working with Charlie Porter to reinvigorate the party in Lane County during the 1950s. He describes a riot that broke out during vice presidential candidate Richard Nixon's 1952 visit to Eugene. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1960. He talks about his constituency and his campaigns, and also describes each of his legislative sessions. He discusses his committee assignments and fellow legislators, including Dick Eymann. He talks about some of the legislation he worked on, including on worker compensation, the justice system, and taxes. He discusses working with the administration of Governor Mark Hatfield. He also talks about his activities after leaving the Legislature in 1960, including his involvement with civic organizations, lobbying, and his law practice in Eugene. He describes some of the cases he handled.

Skelton discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives again from 1965 to 1974. He describes each of his legislative sessions, including his committee assignments and fellow legislators. He discusses working with the administration of Governor Tom McCall. He also talks about meeting fellow legislator Betty Roberts and their subsequent marriage; relocating to Portland in 1967; and his experience at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. He discusses some of the legislation that came up during his legislative service, including on abortion, public transportation, and worker compensation. He describes the reasons he didn't run for re-election in 1974.

Skelton talks about his activities since leaving the Legislature. He discusses the governors that have held office between 1974 and the time of the interview in 1995; Betty Roberts' service in the Oregon Senate; and the role of lobbyists. He talks about returning to the practice of law and serving on the board for Portland Community College. He closes the interview by talking about the influence of television on society and discussing his Christian faith and his family.

Skelton, Keith D. (Keith Dexter), 1918-1995

Oral history interview with George H. Bell

This oral history interview with George Bell was conducted by Vinita Howard from October 31 to November 21, 1994. In this interview, Bell discusses his family background and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon. He briefly discusses his experience in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific Theater during World War II, then goes on to describe his college experience at Southern Oregon College and U.C.L.A. He describes his early career as a high school teacher and college professor, and then the beginnings of his career in journalism at the Medford Mail Tribune and the Oregonian. He then discusses serving as assistant to the president of the state Senate and the speaker of the state House in 1965, including some of the legislation that came up during that session. He also talks about working alongside Monte Montgomery and Harry Boivin. He talks about his next career change, which was working for KGW-TV, first as a day editor and later as a news anchor. Next, he discusses serving as deputy secretary of state under Clay Myers from 1972 to 1979. He also briefly discusses each of his three marriages. Bell talks about serving as assistant director of the Oregon Department of Transportation under Governor Vic Atiyeh, including the department's efforts to boost tourism and the movie industry in the state, funding problems, and working under Glenn Jackson. He goes on to discuss his views on various Oregon political figures, including Mark Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing his activities during retirement, particularly creative writing.

Bell, George H. (George Herbert), 1927-2015

Oral history interview with Roger E. Martin

This oral history interview with Roger E. Martin was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from October 28, 1994, to November 10, 1995. In this interview, Martin discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his family life; his early jobs, including golf caddy; and his early education at Catholic schools. He then talks about attending the University of Oregon, including his studies in Latin American history and his social life. He also talks about his brief service in the U.S. Army. He talks about meeting Janet Duffy, as well as her family background. He speaks about their marriage in 1957 and divorce in 1979, particularly how it affected his children. He talks about his children, their careers, and their families. He discusses working for the family electronics business, Martin Electronics.

Martin discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1967 to 1978. He describes in detail each legislative session in which he served. He talks about his unsuccessful campaigns in 1962 and 1964, as well as his later successful campaigns. He talks about his committee assignments, working with the Senate, and social life. He discusses some of his fellow legislators, including Tony Yturri, Grace Peck, and Robert Smith. He talks about some of the legislation he worked on, including on taxes, water pollution, and government reorganization. He talks about reapportionment, the emergency board, and lobbyists. He discusses the creation of the Department of Fish and Wildlife in 1973. He talks about working with Governor Tom McCall's administration; practical jokes legislators played on one another; and Governor Bob Straub. He speaks at length about his unsuccessful campaign for the Republican nomination for governor in 1978.

Martin discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks his about career as a lobbyist and his continued involvement with the Republican Party. He also discusses the initiative process and recent ballot measures. He talks about his family life; his opinions on legislation current to 1993; and his marriage to Margaret Jane. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

Martin, Roger E. (Roger Edward), 1935-

Oral history interview with Connie McCready

This oral history interview with Connie McCready was conducted by Clark Hansen at McCready's home in Portland, Oregon, from March 21 to July 5, 1994. In this interview, McCready discusses her family background and early life in Portland. She also discusses her early career in journalism working for the Coos Bay Times and the Oregonian; and starting a family with her husband, Oregonian reporter Albert L. McCready. She discusses her involvement with the Republican Party, campaigning, her liberal politics, and her experience as a woman in the Oregon Legislature during the 1967 and 1969 sessions. McCready also discusses legislation she worked on, including taxes, fair employment, public transportation and TriMet, and her work on behalf of sternwheelers. McCready talks about some of the legislators she worked with, including Tom Mahoney, Bob Packwood, Stafford Hansell, and Jason Boe. She then discusses her time in the Portland City Council from 1970 to 1979, including the Mount Hood Freeway vote; the bureaus she ran, including fire, cable, and public works; her support for gay rights; and receiving death threats. She discusses the city commissioners and mayors she worked with, including Frank Ivancie, Neil Goldschmidt, Terry Schrunk, and Mildred Schwab. She also discusses her campaign against John Lorenz in 1976, and Portland's sister-city relationship with Sapporo, Japan.

McCready, Connie (Constance), 1921-2000

Oral history interview with Monte Montgomery

This oral history interview with Monte Montgomery was conducted by Clark Hansen at Montgomery's office in Eugene, Oregon, from January 18 to June 16, 1994. In this interview, Montgomery discusses his family background and early life in Oklahoma, including his memories of the Dust Bowl drought, his father's store, and his early education. He also discusses the racism he learned as a child and coming to terms with it later. He discusses studying engineering at the University of Oklahoma; his wife, Lois Roberts; and coming to Eugene, Oregon, in 1943. He also discusses jobs he held during this time, including working for the Douglas Aircraft Company and selling insurance. He talks about his involvement in the Junior Chamber of Commerce, the Eugene Planning Commission, the Jaycees, and other civic organizations.

Montgomery discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1959 to 1968. He talks about his campaigns, committee assignments, and some of his fellow legislators, including Stafford Hansell, Grace Peck, Kitty Musa, and Tom Mahoney. He describes serving as House minority leader from 1961 to 1963, and speaker of the House from 1965 to 1968. He talks about making committee assignments, working with the Senate, and the administration of Governor Mark Hatfield. He also discusses legislation that he worked on, including on Daylight Savings Time, community colleges, taxes, and worker compensation. He talks about considering running for Oregon governor in 1966, as well as his unsuccessful 1968 campaign for secretary of state. He talks about his relationship with the press, as well as an interview program he hosted. He describes the circumstances surrounding the 1967 riot at the Oregon State Penitentiary.

Montgomery talks about his activities after leaving the Legislature. He discusses the various boards he served on, including Northwest Power and Gas. He talks about the changes in the Republican Party. He describes his involvement with State Accident Insurance Fund Corporation and Association of Oregon Loggers, as well as his subsequent fraud charges, his conviction for misappropriation of funds, and his sentence. He closes the interview by discussing his faith.

Montgomery, Monte (Finis Firman), 1924-2016

Oral history interview with Don Clark

  • SR 1166
  • Collection
  • 1994 August 30 - 1998 March 27

Clark discusses family heritage, education, and career beginnings in the criminal justice system; experiences as Multnomah County sheriff; campaign for the Multnomah County Commission; modernization of county government in Oregon; Mt. Hood freeway and regional transportation planning, Burnside Consortium, Columbia Villa, single-payer health care, and numerous other subjects of policy and politics of city and county in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s.

Clark, Donald Edward, 1933-

Oral history interview with Dick Eymann

This oral history interview with Dick Eymann was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Emerald PUD in Eugene, Oregon, from December 2, 1993, to September 8, 1994. In the interview, Eymann discusses his family background and early life in Saskatchewan, Canada; Scottsbluff, Nebraska; LaSalle, Colorado; Linton, North Dakota; Dallas and Portland, Oregon; and Anaheim, California. He also talks about his experiences studying political science at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, including his early political beliefs and registering as a Democrat. Eymann describes being drafted immediately after college and his experience as a U.S. Air Force airman in the Pacific theater during World War II, including training; deployment to Manila Bay, Philippines, and Okinawa, Japan; his thoughts on the atomic bomb; and serving with African-Americans. He then discusses raising a large family; working for the Weyerhaeuser Company in Springfield, Oregon, and his acquaintance with George Weyerhaeuser; and living on a chicken farm.

Eymann describes his experience representing Lane County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation he worked on, including on taxation, particularly attempts to pass a sales tax; electrical utilities and nuclear power; Lane Community College; and agricultural labor laws. He also speaks about his tenure as speaker of the House. He describes his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party and campaigning. He also discusses some of the people he worked with in the Oregon Legislature, including Keith Skelton, Clarence Barton, Nancy Fadeley, Debbs Potts, Jason Boe, Pat Dooley, and Stafford Hansell. Eymann relates his experience working under various Oregon governors, including Bob Holmes, Mark Hatfield, and Tom McCall. He closes the interview by discussing his life after politics, including his career with the Emerald People's Utility District in Lane County, Oregon.

Eymann, Dick (Richard Oswald), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with George F. Wingard

This oral history interview with George F. Wingard was conducted by Clark Hansen at Wingard's home in Eugene, Oregon, from November 16 to December 9, 1993. Wingard's dog was present and is audible throughout the interview. In this interview, Wingard discusses his family background and early life in Lakeview, Oregon, including his early education. He talks about witnessing his father's death from a heart attack in 1949. He talks about studying pre-med at the University of Oregon and transferring to Oregon State College (now Oregon State University) to study engineering. He discusses his learning disability and his struggle with his studies. He discusses his marriage to Rhea Henault. Wingard then speaks at length about running a construction business in Eugene in the 1960s.

Wingard discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his political career. He talks about serving on the Eugene City Council from 1967 to 1969, including his campaign and working on transportation issues. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1969 to 1970. He discusses his campaign, his fellow legislators, his committee assignments, and some of the legislation he worked on. He also talks about working with Governor Tom McCall's administration. He speaks at length about his opinions on issues such as abortion, field burning, and nuclear power. Wingard discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1971 to 1982. He talks about electing Senate presidents, his committee assignments, and his fellow legislators. He discusses legislation that came up, particularly the Bottle Bill and bills on nuclear power and land use planning. He also talks about his opposition to the lottery; his views on the criminal justice system; and the creation of single-member districts and how that affected the make-up of the Legislature. He speaks at length about the many pieces of legislation he introduced. Wingard discusses his unsuccessful 1980 campaign for state treasurer and his 1982 re-election loss.

Wingard discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks about his unsuccessful campaign for state treasurer in 1992. He closes the interview by talking about the Oregon legislative delegation of 1993.

Wingard, George F., Jr. (George Frank), 1935-

Oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott

This oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott was conducted by Clark Hansen at Hendershott's home in Eugene, Oregon, from November 16, 1993, to January 13, 1994. In this interview, Hendershott discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including his social life, his memories of Armistice Day in 1918, and his interest in skiing. He also talks about his memories of the 1929 stock market crash and the Depression that followed. He talks about attending the University of Oregon from 1931 to 1936, including a description of the campus and his professors. He then discusses serving as district attorney for Hood River County from 1936 to 1938, and talks about practicing law in Eugene, including judges he argued before and some of the cases he handled. He also talks about other lawyers that he admired. He describes his experience serving in Europe in the U.S. Army during World War II. He speaks briefly about his two marriages and his family life.

Hendershott discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1947 to 1949. He talks about his campaign; the 1947 plane crash that killed the governor, the secretary of state, and the president of the Senate; and juggling his service in the Legislature with his family life and his law practice. He talks about his committee assignments, legislation he worked on, and some of his fellow legislators. He discusses some of the issues that were important during his time in the Legislature, including taxes and public utilities.

Hedershott discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks about serving as city attorney for Eugene from 1959 to 1971; Martin Luther King Day celebrations and the black community; and hosting foreign exchange students. He speaks about his law practice, including arguing cases and the changes in the court system. He discusses traveling in Europe, in the Middle East, and in Asia. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of his family background and legal career.

Hendershott, Herman P. (Herman Phipps), 1913-2007

Oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan

This oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Portland, Oregon, from October 15 to December 9, 1993, and on April 10, 2002. Robert Duncan was also present. In this interview, Boe-Duncan discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon; her Lutheran upbringing; her early interest in music; her high school experience; and attending Pacific Lutheran University. She then discusses her marriage to Jason Boe and the difficulties involved in getting married at a young age. She talks about Jason Boe's early political career and involvement with the Democratic Party; daily life in Reedsport, Oregon, in the 1950s; and raising a family. She then discusses working as Jason Boe's secretary while he served in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1964 to 1970, including his campaigns. She also speaks about preparing the family to move to Salem, Oregon; social life in Salem, including her relationships with other politicians' wives; and the duties of a representative's secretary. She speaks at length about Jason Boe's legislative record in the Oregon Senate from 1970 to 1980, particularly his work advancing the legislative agenda of Governor Tom McCall. She also talks about his service as president of the Senate from 1973 to 1980, his work on improving the Capitol building, and his efforts in strengthening the power of the legislative branch. She also describes Jason Boe's political ambitions. Boe-Duncan then talks about Jason Boe's activities after leaving the Legislature, including his work as a lobbyist. She describes her career as a musician, which she began pursuing at age 40, as well as her work for the Oregon Historical Society from 1986 to 1989, and for Portland State University from 1989 to 1994. She closes the interview by talking about her marriage to Robert Duncan in 1995 and her family life.

Boe-Duncan, Kathryn, 1930-

Oral history interview with F. Leo Smith

This oral history interview with F. Leo Smith was conducted by Clark Hansen at Smith's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 23 to October 28, 1993. In this interview, Smith discusses the history of the Ku Klux Klan and anti-Catholic sentiment in Oregon. He then discusses the policies of the Democratic Party in the early 20th century, particularly in Oregon, and his involvement with the party. He describes his early law career in private practice during the Depression. He talks about his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1939 to 1944, including his campaigns, constituency, and committee assignments. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on in the House, particularly a bill on textbooks in public schools that was later overturned by the Oregon Supreme Court. He then discusses his brief term as Multnomah County district attorney, from 1957 to 1958, and the many vice cases he prosecuted. He also talks about his involvement with the Catholic Church as a member, lawyer, and lobbyist. He discusses his later career as a lobbyist, particularly his work on establishing the Public Employees Retirement System while lobbying for the Oregon State Employees Association, and in defeating a bill on abortion while lobbying for the Archdiocese of Portland. He closes the interview by talking about the changes in society over the 20th century.

Smith, F. Leo (Frank Leo)

Oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry

This oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry was conducted by Clark Hansen at Newbry's home in Talent, Oregon, from May 6-7, 1993. In this interview, Newbry discusses his family background and early life in Talent, including life on the family farm and the Depression. He also discusses the political career of his father, Earl T. Newbry. He talks about his education in Talent, as well as attending Oregon State College, and then Pomona College. He also briefly discusses serving in the Air Force during World War II. He discusses his courtship with Charlotte Short and their subsequent marriage in 1943. He discusses his return to Oregon in 1945 and taking over the family orchards and fruit business in 1949 when his father was appointed secretary of state, as well as several community organizations he was involved with. He discusses his involvement with the Republican Party, serving on the Talent school board, and running for the Oregon Senate in 1960. He discusses his legislative career in the Senate from 1961 to 1974, including his committee assignments. He also talks about his fellow legislators, including Harry Boivin, Grace Peck, Ted Hallock, Stafford Hansell, Debbs Potts, Bill Holmstrom, and Jason Boe. He also discusses legislation he worked on, including on land use, labor, taxes, health care, and agriculture. He talks about the administrations of governors Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, and Neil Goldschmidt; coalitions in the Senate; the procedure of creating legislation; and reapportionment. He closes the interview by discussing SB 100, the land-use planning bill of 1974.

Newbry, Lynn W. (Lyndel Warren), 1923-2012

Oral history interview with Ted Hallock

This oral history interview with Ted Hallock was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Hallock Agency in Portland, Oregon, from March 15 to November 2, 1993. In the interview, Hallock discusses his family background and early life, mostly in the Irvington neighborhood of Portland; growing up during the Depression; and his early career in broadcasting, starting out in sound effects at KGW. He also discusses his interest in music; attending the University of Oregon; and his service as a bombardier in the Air Force during World War II and its effect on his life. Hallock discusses his decision to pursue a career in journalism and winning a Peabody Award for his radio broadcasting work at KPOJ.

Hallock talks about his experiences as a senator in the Oregon Legislature, and discusses many of the senators he worked with, such as Harry Boivin, Don Willner, Ben Musa, Tony Yturri, and Jason Boe. He also discusses his advertising agency, the Hallock Agency, and working on election campaigns, including U.S. Senator Wayne Morse's campaigns. Hallock details the some of the legislation he worked on while serving in the Oregon Senate from 1963 to 1982, including on health care and fluoridation; labor laws; sex education and abortion access; environmental regulations, land use planning, and SB 100; and electrical utilities. He also discusses his experiences working with governors Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, Vic Atiyeh and Neil Goldschmidt. Hallock closes by discussing his work on the Northwest Power Planning Council, including energy conservation, nuclear waste disposal, and preservation of endangered species, particularly salmon.

Hallock, Ted

Oral history interview with Victor Atiyeh

This oral history interview with Victor Atiyeh was conducted by Clark Hansen at Atiyeh's office in Portland, Oregon, from November 24, 1992, to September 10, 1993, and on June 11, 1998. In this interview, Atiyeh discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his experience growing up as a Syrian American. He discusses his early education; talks about the family carpet business, Atiyeh Brothers; and his involvement in high school football. He describes his memories of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and his unsuccessful attempt to enlist in the military during World War II. He talks about the University of Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political beliefs. He also talks about his marriage to Delores Hewitt in 1944; dropping out of college to take over the family business; and his involvement in the Republican Party and other organizations.

Atiyeh discusses his service in Oregon state government and his political campaigns. He talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1959 to 1964. He talks about his fellow legislators, including Stafford Hansell, Monte Montgomery, and Walter Pearson. He also talks about working with Governor Mark Hatfield. He discusses his committee assignments, legislation that came up during his service in the House, and working across party lines. Atiyeh then discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1965 to 1979, and describes the differences between the Senate and the House. He talks about his fellow senators, including Ted Hallock, Tony Yturri, and Don Willner. He discusses some of the legislation that came up during his service in the Senate, his committee assignments, and Senate procedures. He speaks at length about his involvement in taxation and environmental issues. Atiyeh also talks about national politics contemporary to 1992 and 1993; his voting record; and his relationship with the press.

Atiyeh discusses serving as Oregon governor from 1979 to 1987, including his campaigns. He talks about the transition, his staff, and administration appointments. He describes his philosophy of government, working with the Legislature, and the effect of the governorship on his family life. He discusses his administration's legislative agenda, including on energy and taxation; his use of the veto; and his relationships with other state governors. He discusses much of the legislation he signed as governor, his budgets, and many of the reforms he implemented. He also talks about Oregon's trade relationship with Japan, as well as a 1984 trip to the Middle East, particularly Syria. He describes the major issues of each legislative session during his government service.

Atiyeh discusses Oregon politics since he left elected office in 1987. He talks about Oregon governors Neil Goldschmidt and Barbara Roberts, as well as Oregon's congressional delegation. He discusses his involvement with the Boy Scouts, the Japan-America Society, and other organizations. The interview closes with a session conducted in 1998, in which Atiyeh discusses the Northwest Power Planning Council and his retirement activities, as well as a 1998 shooting at Thurston High School and his stance on gun control.

Atiyeh, Victor

Oral history interview with Frankie Bell

This oral history interview with Frankie Bell was conducted by Vinita Howard from November 12-30, 1992. In this interview, Bell discusses her family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon. She discusses her education and attending the University of Oregon. She talks about the difficulty of starting a family while still attending college and trying to have a career. She discusses the various part-time jobs she held until she began working at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, in 1966 as a tour guide. She talks about working at the information desk at the Oregon Legislature from 1967 to the time of the interview in 1992, including facing sexism on the job. She describes her observations on the Legislature over her two and a half decades there, including on lobbyists, rumors, and inaugural changes. She also talks about the history of the Capitol building, as well as organizing holidays and exhibits at the building; the gift shop; and school tours. She closes the interview by speaking briefly about the personalities of many legislators over the years.

Bell, Frankie (Frances Estelle), 1937-

Oral history interview with Loran L. Stewart

This oral history interview with Loran L. Stewart was conducted by Clark Hansen in Eugene, Oregon, from October 29, 1992, to June 22, 1993. In this interview, Stewart discusses his family background and early life in logging camps in Lane County. He talks about his early education, working at Booth-Kelly lumber mill, and his experience during the Depression. He talks about studying forestry engineering at Oregon State University and working as a road locator for the U.S. Forest Service in the Willamette National Forest. He describes his Army service in during World War II, including his journey through North Africa and South Asia to reach China, where he spent much of the war. He briefly talks about the 1992 election, which had just occurred at the time of the interview. Stewart describes his return to civilian life in 1946, including working as an engineer for forestry companies. He also talks about meeting his wife, Dorothy Elizabeth McDonald, and their subsequent marriage in 1936. He gives a brief history of the lumber industry in Oregon; describes his 1946 purchase of Bohemia Lumber Company, which he refers to as Bohemia Mills, as well as the running of the company; and the 1991 sale of Bohemia Lumber Company to Willamette Industries.

Stewart discusses his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955. He talks about his campaign and his support for term limits. He also describes the Order of the Antelope, as well as other fraternal organizations he was involved with. He talks about his committee assignments, his fellow legislators, and legislation that he worked on, particularly regarding taxation and forestry. He discusses the administration of Governor Paul Patterson; working with lobbyists; and interacting with his constituents. He also discusses his 1956 re-election loss.

Stewart talks about his activities since leaving elected office. He discusses serving as president of Bohemia Lumber Company. He speaks at length about the growth of the company, as well as the forestry products industry. He talks about the increasing environmental movement during the 1980s and how that affected the business. He also discusses serving on the State Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee. He then reflects on Oregon legislators who served after his legislative service. He closes the interview by talking a little about his recreational activities and social life.

Stewart, Loran LaSells, 1911-2005

Oral history interview with Patrick E. Dooley

This oral history interview with Patrick E. Dooley was conducted by Clark Hansen at Dooley's home in Wilsonville, Oregon, from September 23 to October 26, 1992. Barbara Lynch Dooley was also present for the session conducted on October 26, 1992.

In this interview, Dooley discusses his family background and early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, including his early education at Catholic schools and his experience during the Depression. He talks about moving to Washington for his sister's education and about working various jobs. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Army in North Africa and Italy during World War II. He also talks about his marriage to Barbara Lynch in 1942. He discusses his determination to go to law school after his discharge in 1945; attending Reed College while working full time; studying law at Northwestern College of Law; and taking the Oregon bar exam. He talks about practicing law in Portland with Leo Smith, including some of the judges he argued before and some of the cases he handled.

Dooley discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1953 to 1958. He describes his campaigns, his committee assignments, and legislation he worked on, particularly regarding taxes. He talks about Governor Paul Patterson's administration, as well as some of Dooley's fellow legislators. He also discusses partisanship in the Legislature and his role in the formation of party caucuses. He talks about his experience as speaker of the House from 1957 to 1958, including serving as acting governor, making committee assignments, and working with Governor Bob Holmes.

Dooley discusses serving as a Multnomah County Circuit Court judge from 1968 to 1983. He talks about court procedure, cases he heard, and his feelings about handing down sentences. He spends some time looking at a scrapbook and talking about the photographs and articles in it. He talks about judges and lawyers he worked with and admired; changes in the legal profession; and his philosophy of law. He closes the interview by reflecting on Oregon political history and his own accomplishments.

Dooley, Patrick Eugene, 1918-1999

Oral history interview with Howard Morgan

This oral history interview with Howard Morgan was conducted by Clark Hansen from August 25 to October 7, 1992. The interview was conducted in three sessions. Rosina Morgan was also present and contributed to the interview during the first session.

In the first session, conducted at Morgan's boat in Portland on August 25, 1992, Morgan discusses his family background, as well as the family background of his wife, Rosina Morgan. He talks about his early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, including his recreational activities, his education, and jobs he worked during the Depression. He also speaks briefly about spending a few years living with his aunt in San Francisco, California. He briefly discusses his experiences at the University of Oregon and Reed College. He talks about the jobs he worked during his college years, his memories of Pearl Harbor, and his experiences at the University of Berkeley. He speaks at length about working for the Office of Defense Transportation in Washington, D.C., and then for the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He describes his role in supplying equipment to the Navy and discusses spending time in Natal, Brazil, and in the Pacific Theater. The Morgans discuss their courtship and marriage. Rosina Morgan talks about her education and raising a family while Howard Morgan was working for the Navy.

In the second session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland on October 6, 1992, Morgan revisits the topic of working for the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He talks about instances of fraud and waste that he uncovered during that time. He talks about his activities after his discharge in 1945, including ranching and working for the American Veterans Committee. He also talks about his friendships with Monroe Sweetland and Dick Neuberger. Morgan then discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party of Oregon, particularly his efforts to make the Democratic Party competitive in Oregon. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives in 1949, including his election and his experience as a legislator in the minority party. He talks about lawmakers he worked with and legislation he worked on. He then discusses his service as chair of the Democratic Party of Oregon, including recruiting people to run for office, increasing the influence of the party, and recruiting Wayne Morse. He speaks about the various political campaigns he was involved in and talks about the legislative careers of Democrats who were elected during his time as chair.

In the third and final session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society on October 7, 1992, Morgan continues speaking about the various political campaigns he was involved in and the legislative careers of Democrats who were elected during his time as chair. He also talks about his admiration for Adlai Stevenson and working for Stevenson's 1956 presidential campaign, as well as his experience at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. He goes on to talk about Oregon Democratic politics and politicians after he left the position of party chair. He then talks about his accomplishments during his service as Public Utility Commissioner from 1957 to 1959, and describes his dealings with some private utility companies, particularly Pacific Power & Light and the Portland Traction Company. He describes his accomplishments as a member of the Federal Power Commission from 1961 to 1963, and talks about his experience living in Washington, D.C. He talks about his reasons for running for the Oregon Senate in 1966 as an anti-Vietnam War candidate. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Morgan, Howard, 1914-

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