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Oral history interviews with Tatsuro Yada [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

Yada, Tatsuro, 1916-2003

Oral history interviews with Tatsuro Yada [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

Yada, Tatsuro, 1916-2003

Oral history interviews with Tatsuro Yada [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

Yada, Tatsuro, 1916-2003

Oral history interviews with Tatsuro Yada [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

Yada, Tatsuro, 1916-2003

Oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada

This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon.

In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

Yada, Tatsuro, 1916-2003

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the third and final interview session, conducted on July 20, 1992, Murakami talks about his children, their education, their families, and their careers. He then talks about his retirement activities, particularly his involvement in Japanese American community organizations. He also revisits the topic of his Army experience during World War II. He shares his opinion about Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which granted redress to Japanese Americans the government incarcerated during the war. He closes the interview by reflecting upon his life and accomplishments.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the third and final interview session, conducted on July 20, 1992, Murakami talks about his children, their education, their families, and their careers. He then talks about his retirement activities, particularly his involvement in Japanese American community organizations. He also revisits the topic of his Army experience during World War II. He shares his opinion about Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which granted redress to Japanese Americans the government incarcerated during the war. He closes the interview by reflecting upon his life and accomplishments.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the second interview session, conducted on July 14, 1992, Murakami continues discussing playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League, as well as his interest in other sports. He also talks about his social life as a teenager. He speaks about a few instances of prejudice that he experienced. He discusses his experience in the U.S. Army, serving in the European Theater during World War II. He also talks about the U.S. government’s incarceration of his family at the Minidoka War Relocation Center, and about his marriage to Sumi Matsushita. He then discusses his life in Portland after his discharge from the Army in 1945, including working in construction and teaching building construction at Benson Polytechnic High School.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the second interview session, conducted on July 14, 1992, Murakami continues discussing playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League, as well as his interest in other sports. He also talks about his social life as a teenager. He speaks about a few instances of prejudice that he experienced. He discusses his experience in the U.S. Army, serving in the European Theater during World War II. He also talks about the U.S. government’s incarceration of his family at the Minidoka War Relocation Center, and about his marriage to Sumi Matsushita. He then discusses his life in Portland after his discharge from the Army in 1945, including working in construction and teaching building construction at Benson Polytechnic High School.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on July 13, 1992, Murakami discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Sherwood, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon. He talks about the grocery store that his father, Shuichi Sam Murakami, owned, his experience during the Depression, and his education. He discusses jobs he worked after dropping out of high school and talks about playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on July 13, 1992, Murakami discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Sherwood, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon. He talks about the grocery store that his father, Shuichi Sam Murakami, owned, his experience during the Depression, and his education. He discusses jobs he worked after dropping out of high school and talks about playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League. In the second interview session, conducted on July 14, 1992, Murakami continues discussing playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League, as well as his interest in other sports. He also talks about his social life as a teenager. He speaks about a few instances of prejudice that he experienced. He discusses his experience in the U.S. Army, serving in the European Theater during World War II. He also talks about the U.S. government’s incarceration of his family at the Minidoka War Relocation Center, and about his marriage to Sumi Matsushita. He then discusses his life in Portland after his discharge from the Army in 1945, including working in construction and teaching building construction at Benson Polytechnic High School.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on July 13, 1992, Murakami discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Sherwood, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon. He talks about the grocery store that his father, Shuichi Sam Murakami, owned, his experience during the Depression, and his education. He discusses jobs he worked after dropping out of high school and talks about playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Murakami [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami’s home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on July 13, 1992, Murakami discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Sherwood, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon. He talks about the grocery store that his father, Shuichi Sam Murakami, owned, his experience during the Depression, and his education. He discusses jobs he worked after dropping out of high school and talks about playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League. In the second interview session, conducted on July 14, 1992, Murakami continues discussing playing baseball in the Nisei Baseball League, as well as his interest in other sports. He also talks about his social life as a teenager. He speaks about a few instances of prejudice that he experienced. He discusses his experience in the U.S. Army, serving in the European Theater during World War II. He also talks about the U.S. government’s incarceration of his family at the Minidoka War Relocation Center, and about his marriage to Sumi Matsushita. He then discusses his life in Portland after his discharge from the Army in 1945, including working in construction and teaching building construction at Benson Polytechnic High School. In the third and final interview session, conducted on July 20, 1992, Murakami talks about his children, their education, their families, and their careers. He then talks about his retirement activities, particularly his involvement in Japanese American community organizations. He also revisits the topic of his Army experience during World War II. He shares his opinion about Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which granted redress to Japanese Americans the government incarcerated during the war. He closes the interview by reflecting upon his life and accomplishments.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with John Y. Murakami

This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami's home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 13, 1992, Murakami discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Sherwood, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon. He talks about the grocery store that his father, Shuichi Sam Murakami, owned; his experience during the Depression; and his education. He discusses jobs he worked after dropping out of high school and talks about playing in the Nisei Baseball League.

In the second interview session, conducted on July 14, 1992, Murakami continues discussing his experiences in the Nisei Baseball League, as well as his interest in other sports. He also talks about his social life as a teenager. He speaks about a few instances of prejudice that he experienced. He discusses his experience in the U.S. Army, serving in the European Theater during World War II. He also talks about the U.S. government's incarceration of his family at the Minidoka War Relocation Center, and about his marriage to Sumi Matsushita. He then discusses his life in Portland after his discharge from the Army in 1945, including working in construction and teaching building construction at Benson Polytechnic High School.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on July 20, 1992, Murakami talks about his children, their education, their families, and their careers. He then talks about his retirement activities, particularly his involvement in Japanese American community organizations. He also revisits the topic of his Army experience during World War II. He shares his opinion about the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which granted redress to Japanese Americans whom the government incarcerated during the war. He closes the interview by reflecting upon his life and accomplishments.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Crèche at Carr Motors, Beaverton

Live chickens in a Crèche at Carr Motors in Beaverton. The chickens can be seen sitting on a wooden manger, in front of a praying angel figurine (negative 6 of 6).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Chinese American Citizen Alliance meeting, Portland

Members of the Chinese American Citizen Alliance in Portland, during a meeting at an unidentified location in Portland. The men are seated at several long tables, each other papers and a pencil. Another man sits at a desk at the far side of the room. Banners hang on a wall at the right side of the frame, one for the San Francisco Lodge (negative 1 of 1).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Lion Cubs, Portland Zoo

Two lion clubs at the Portland Zoo (later the Oregon Zoo). The two cubs are laying in an area of stray, with one turned towards the camera (negative 1 of 4).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Al Knowles with Lion Cubs, Portland Zoo

Portland Zoo (later the Oregon Zoo) trainer Al Knowles, kneeling in an area of straw and holding two small lion cubs. He holds the cubs to his chest and he looks downward (negative 2 of 4).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Explosion of fat rendering boiler at Pacific Meat Company, Portland

People inspect damage after an explosion at the Pacific Meat Company fat rendering boiler, at N. Columbia Boulevard and N. Burrage Avenue in Portland. The ceiling and windows of the building have been severely damaged, with barrels of fat visible on the floor (negative 1 of 5).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Auguste Rodin show preparation at Portland Art Museum

An unidentified man points at the arm of a Rodin sculpture at the Portland Art Museum, in preparation for a new exhibit. The sculpture appears to be resting on a wooden cart, as a woman, wearing a smock, intently gazes at its arm (negative 7 of 9).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Auguste Rodin show preparation at Portland Art Museum

An unidentified woman rests her hand on a Rodin sculpture at the Portland Art Museum, in preparation for a new exhibit. A man stands next to her, looking upward at the metal sculpture. The woman wears a work smock and holds a paint brush in one hand (negative 6 of 9).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Golden Years Club at Neighborhood House, Portland

A woman plays the piano during an event for the Golden Years Club in Portland, at Neighborhood House (3030 S.W. 2nd Avenue?). The woman holds her hands to the piano keys while turning towards the camera. Next to her is a man playing a set of drums, with people dancing in the background in front of the stage (negative 6 of 11).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

"Miss Flame" of 1955 contest

Contestants for “Miss Flame” of 1954 at a Junior Chamber of Commerce luncheon at the Multnomah Hotel in Portland. The contestants are wearing bathing suits while standing on chair, each holding a sign with a number and name. A photograph from this series was published in the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 29, 1954 (negative 1 of 3).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

"Miss Flame" of 1954 winner, Marilyn Craghead

Marilyn Craghead being crowned “Miss Flame” of 1954 during a luncheon for the Junior Chamber of Commerce luncheon at the Multnomah Hotel in Portland. She stands on a chair as a man sprays her with a fire extinguisher. A photograph from this series was published in the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 29, 1954 (negative 3 of 3).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Portland fire fighters doing practice drill

An unidentified Portland fire fighter jumping from a building and onto a life net. The net is being held on all sides by other fire fighters, during a drill session for new members (negative 10 of 10).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Portland fire fighters doing practice drill

A group of unidentified fire fighters in Portland, doing a practice drill. One man us laying in a blanket-covered litter while another holds an oxygen mask in front of his face. Four other members of the group are kneeling down and observing the demonstration (negative 8 of 10).

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

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