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Oregon Wine Archives Oral History Project

  • SR Oregon Wine Oral History Series
  • Collection
  • 1990-2003

The Oregon Wine Archives, established at the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) Library, preserves the history of the wine growing industry in Oregon through the collection of various media, including manuscripts, photographs, artifacts, films, and oral histories.

From 2002 to 2003, OHS conducted interviews with notable figures in the wine growing industry, including vintners, vineyard growers, community members, and workers active in the development of Oregon’s wine industry.

The oral interviews collected through this project aim to facilitate better historical understanding in the following areas:

· the process of growing grapes and how it has changed
· the process of wine making and how it has changed
· the experiences and perceptions of people in the wine industry
· how the wine making business has changed
· insight on events related to the wine industry
· community attitudes toward wine and the wine industry
· the economic and social evolution of the wine industry in Oregon
· lobbying and legislative efforts on behalf of the wine industry

Oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland

This oral history interview with Monroe Mark Sweetland was conducted by Richard Harmon from November 16, 1984, to October 26, 1987, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In this interview, Sweetland discusses his family background and early life, including his childhood in rural Michigan; his early involvement in Democratic politics; and his experiences at Wittenberg University and Cornell University. He discusses his political activism during college, including his involvement with the Student League for Industrial Democracy and his political activism on behalf of Socialist candidates. Sweetland also discusses his political activities after his return to Oregon in 1935, including his work with the Oregon Commonwealth Federation and his decision to leave the Socialist Party and join the Democratic Party. Also discussed is his work with labor unions; the New Deal programs; and his work with the Oregon Democratic Party. He briefly talks about World War II and its effect on Oregon politics, particularly the effect the Hitler-Stalin pact had on American communists and the Oregon Commonwealth Federation; internment of Japanese-Americans; and his own pacifism. Sweetland goes on to talk about his involvement with the Democratic Party of Oregon after the war as national committeeman; the factions within the party; and mobilizing women and black voters. He also discusses his ownership of several Oregon newspapers (the Molalla Pioneer, the Newport News, and the Milwaukie Review) and about running them with the help of his wife, Lillie Sweetland. In addition, he describes his experiences as a legislator in the Oregon House of Representatives and Senate during the 1950s and early 1960s. Topics include: education; attempts to pass a sales tax; campaign finance; and Wayne Morse's switch to the Democratic Party. He also discusses working closely with Howard Morgan, the national chairman of the Democratic Party; U.S. Senator Dick Neuberger; and U.S. Representative Edith Green. Sweetland talks about his relationship with Mark Hatfield and running for secretary of state against him in 1956; the 1962 presidential election and his support of John F. Kennedy; and his campaign for secretary of state in 1964. Finally, he discusses his activities after leaving the Legislature, including his interest in Indonesia and continued advocacy for education as a lobbyist for the National Education Association.

Sweetland, Monroe, 1910-2006

Oral history interview with Bernie Foster

This oral history interview with Bernie Foster was conducted by Jan Dilg at The Skanner Newsgroup offices in Portland, Oregon, from August 30 to October 12, 2017. Bernie Foster was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was recorded over three sessions; however, the first part of the first session was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 30, 2017, Foster discusses the history and daily operation of The Skanner, the Portland-based newspaper he co-founded. He talks about hiring journalists, attempting to expand into radio, and running an online news site. He talks about his involvement with the National Black Publishers Association and some of the stories he published, including on the topic of policing in Portland.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 17, 2017, Foster discusses the Skanner Foundation, which grants awards and scholarships to members of Oregon's black community. He talks about starting the foundation in the early 1990s; the foundation's annual fundraiser, the Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Breakfast; and some of the community members who have received awards and scholarships. He also briefly talks about his experience surviving cancer. He discusses the Portland Police Bureau and shares his thoughts about police brutality against black people. He talks about his involvement in the renaming of Union Avenue to Martin King Luther, Jr. Boulevard. He then talks about his motivation for starting The Skanner, some of the stories the newspaper has published, and building a brand. He discusses preservation issues associated with running a website and how he handled those issues with The Skanner's site.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on October 12, 2017, Foster revisits topics that were discussed in the unrecorded part of the first interview session. He talks about founding The Skanner with his wife, Bobbie Doré Foster, in 1975, including getting advertisers, practicing journalism in the 1970s, and distributing the paper and finding an audience. He talks about some of the stories he published, about handling dishonest sources, and about covering local politics. He discusses some of his interactions with the community, the changes in the Portland black community since the 1970s, and some examples of his activism. He talks about his relationship with the Oregon Historical Society, including receiving the History Makers award in 2013 and donating The Skanner's photograph archive. He shares his hopes for the future of the newspaper, talks about the importance of journalism in a democracy, and revisits the topic of his motivation in starting The Skanner. He closes the interview by discussing his involvement in the Hood to Coast Relay.

Foster, Bernie (Bernard), 1940-

Oral history interview with Bobbie Doré Foster

This oral history interview with Bobbie Doré Foster was conducted by Jan Dilg in the office of The Skanner Newsgroup from August 29 to September 26, 2017. Bobbie Doré Foster was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 29, 2017, Foster discusses her early life in Abbeville, Louisiana. She talks about the importance of education, and briefly describes her education in Louisiana. She then talks about moving to Astoria, Oregon, in 1965, and attending Clatsop Community College. She discusses spending some years in Seattle, Washington; settling in Portland, Oregon; and studying journalism at Portland State University. She speaks about her involvement in the founding of The Skanner Newsgroup with her husband, Bernie Foster, in 1975; describes the process of printing a newspaper; and talks about the mission of the paper. She talks about the paper's readership, gentrification in the neighborhood of the Skanner building, and expanding the paper to Seattle. She talks about issues affecting the black community; talks about her experience as a woman in the media, and about as other women journalists; and discusses other black newspapers around the United States.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 12, 2017, Foster discusses the Skanner Foundation, including the scholarship and awards program, and fundraising events. She talks about her and Bernie Foster's involvement in the renaming of Union Avenue to Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard. She also talks about a fire at a building owned by The Skanner that occurred during that time. She then discusses her involvement with several community organizations, including the Rotary Club, De La Salle North Catholic High School, and the NAACP. She also talks about her involvement with the Saint Andrew Catholic Church.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on September 26, 2017, Foster discusses awards she received, and also revisits the topic of studying journalism at Portland State University. She then talks about the many awards The Skanner has received. She also discusses the donation of The Skanner photograph archive to the Oregon Historical Society. She talks about the challenges of running a newspaper, where The Skanner has been most successful, and how the paper has changed over the decades. She closes the interview by discussing the importance of role models for black children.

Foster, Bobbie Doré, 1938-

Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris

This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, in three sessions from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Harris was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Harris discusses her family background and early life with her grandmother in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, and then with her parents and siblings in Madrid, Spain. She discusses her experiences as the only member of her family to speak Spanish and as the only black person in her class. She also describes growing up in Harlem and its community. She discusses her education in New York, including a teacher strike in 1968; starting a black literature class; racism that she, her teachers, and other students faced; and her early activism and leadership roles. She also talks about the Vietnam War, particularly its effect on two of her brothers, who served in the Air Force during that time. She discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including how she chose that school. She also speaks about her and her brothers' experiences with police. She talks about events that shaped her political outlook, including the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.; her love of mystery novels by black women authors; and people who have influenced her. She discusses some of the awards she has received, her involvement in annual Kwanzaa celebrations, and her work as an educator.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 3, 2018, Harris discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, including her efforts to make the curriculum less Eurocentric. She talks about her involvement with Ron Herndon and the black community in Portland; racism she experienced and witnessed; and her involvement with the Black Student Union. She describes the origins of the Black Educational Center, which provided free summer education to black youth and became a full-time private school in 1974. She also talks about continuing her studies at Portland State University. She speaks at length about her work as an educator, including designing lessons for her students, working with parents, and taking her students on field trips to meet public figures. She then discusses working at the Talking Drum bookstore and her involvement in Portland Kwanzaa celebrations. She speaks at length about working with Portland Public Schools to improve the educational environment, particularly for black students. She talks about working with the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory beginning in 1992. She closes the session by discussing her family life.

In the third session, conducted on December 12, 2018, Harris discusses the work of the Black United Front towards providing quality, non-racist education. She also talks about her involvement with the BUF. She talks about the presence of police in schools, the rise of charter schools, and organizing black college fairs. She discusses her involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, including the coalition's efforts toward a federal investigation of police violence in Portland. She also outlines a brief history of police killings of black people in Portland and describes some of the memorials she attended. She then describes organizing a welcoming committee and other volunteer efforts for New Orleans evacuees in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She also shares the story of arranging a funeral for a baby who was found in a dumpster, and whom she named Baby Precious. She closes the interview by talking about some of the awards and other recognition she has received, and her plans for the future.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Nadyne Yoneko Dozono

This oral history interview with Nadyne Yoneko Dozono was conducted by Clark Hansen at Dozono's home in Portland, Oregon, from January 23 to February 5, 1998. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. The interview was conducted in seven sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 23, 1998, Dozono discusses her family background, including her parents' experiences immigrating to the United States in the early 20th century. She talks about Japanese culture, including flower arranging, marriage and wedding practices, and Japanese social structure. She speaks about her early life in Portland, Oregon, including the Portland Japantown, the neighborhoods and houses she lived in, and her home and family life. She also talks about the Japanese food that her mother cooked and sold. She closes the session by discussing her social life and her education.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 26, 1998, Dozono continues discussing her early life in Portland, Oregon, including her social life, her education, and her siblings. She talks about her poor health in her youth, celebrating both Japanese and American holidays, and picking berries in the summers. She then speaks about being sent to Japan at age 16 for a Japanese education. She talks about her journey to Japan by ship in 1931, the family members she met and lived with in Japan, and learning the Japanese language and customs. She closes the session by discussing her experiences adjusting to life in Japan and describing the house she lived in.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 29, 1998, Dozono continues discussing the family members she met and lived with in Japan, and her experiences adjusting to life there. She describes the house she lived in, her daily life, and learning Japanese customs. She talks about sewing traditional Japanese clothing, performing the Japanese tea ceremony, and the nuances of the Japanese language. She also describes the town she lived in, Seki Machi in Gifu prefecture, as well as Tokyo. She talks about Japanese festivals, plays, and holidays. She speaks at length about her arranged marriage to Asazo Dozono in 1934. She talks about Asazo Dozono's career and about raising children, including her first child's death at age 1 during an epidemic. She closes the session by describing life in Japan during World War II and explains that she was not well-informed about world events at the time.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on January 30, 1998, Dozono continues describing life in Japan during World War II. She also revisits the topic of her first child's death during an epidemic. She talks about rationing and shortages, as well as being uninformed about U.S. government's incarceration of Japanese-Americans in concentration camps. She describes the information the Japanese government gave the citizenry about the war's progress, the reaction of the people to Japan's surrender, and the bombing of Okayama City, as well as the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. She talks about the aftermath of the war, including her husband losing his job due to his loyalty to the Japanese government, the American occupation, and revealing herself as an American citizen. She discusses her work as an interpreter for the American military; talks about the difficulty of explaining democracy to Japanese citizens; and shares stories about cultural misunderstandings between American troops and the Japanese population. She also talks about the changes that the U.S. made to Japan. She then discusses her work with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission as an interpreter in Hiroshima; describes the effects of radiation sickness that she witnessed; and shares her opinion that the bombings were unnecessary. She closes the session by sharing a story about acting as an interpreter for Jean MacArthur, the spouse of U.S. General Douglas MacArthur.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 2, 1998, Dozono discusses returning to Oregon with her daughter in 1953, then bringing her husband and sons later, and reconnecting with her siblings. She talks about readjusting to life in the U.S., working for the Japanese Ancestral Society, and her shock at realizing that racism was still a problem in the U.S. She also talks about her family's experiences during and after their incarceration by the U.S. government during World War II. She closes the session by discussing how her husband and children adjusted to life in the U.S.; her continued work as an interpreter; and her involvement in various community organizations particularly the Japanese Ancestral Society and the Veleda Nisei Women's Club.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on February 4, 1998, Dozono discusses the Japanese-American community in the Pacific Northwest, the community's reaction to incarceration by the U.S. government, and the movement for reparations. She talks more about her involvement in community organizations, particularly the Japanese Ancestral Society and the Veleda Nisei Women's Club. She also talks about gender roles in Japanese culture and how they have changed over the 20th century. She discusses her work speaking in schools about Japanese culture and the U.S. government's incarceration of Japanese Americans. She talks about Japanese-American organizations, including the Oregon Nikkei Endowment, as well as the Japanese-American community. She also discusses several trips she took back to Japan. She closes the session by talking about her children, their families, and their careers.

In the seventh and final interview session, conducted on February 5, 1998, Dozono continues discussing her children, their families, and their careers, while looking at photographs. She then talks about some of her American friends, including Maurine Neuberger; describes her involvement in various community organizations, particularly Ikoi no Kai; and closes the interview by discussing her hopes for the future.

Dozono, Nadyne Yoneko, 1915-2013

Oral history interview with George Iwasaki

This oral history interview with George Iwasaki was conducted by Etsu Osaki at the Oregon Buddhist Church in Portland, Oregon, from August 19 to September 16, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 19, 1992, Iwasaki discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Hillsboro, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese-American community in Oregon and about his education. He then discusses working on the family farm during the Depression, his marriage to Tomiko Natsuhara, and the lead-up to the U.S. government's incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, including making arrangements for the family farmland. He talks about his family's experiences while they were detained at the Portland Assembly Center and about accepting the option to work as fieldworkers in Nyssa, Oregon, including living conditions in the agricultural camp run by the Farm Security Administration. He then discusses returning to Hillsboro after the family's release in 1945.

In the second and final interview session, conducted on September 16, 1992, Iwasaki continues discussing the family's return to Hillsboro after their release in 1945, and describes how the family recovered their farmland and restarted their business. He talks about the evolution of the family farming business, now known as Iwasaki Bros., to focus on bedding plants. He also speaks about his involvement in Japanese American community organizations, including the Oregon Buddhist Church. He closes the interview by talking about his children, their families, and their careers.

Iwasaki, George, 1912-2009

Oral history interview with Frankie Bell

This oral history interview with Frankie Bell was conducted by Vinita Howard from November 12-30, 1992. In this interview, Bell discusses her family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon. She discusses her education and attending the University of Oregon. She talks about the difficulty of starting a family while still attending college and trying to have a career. She discusses the various part-time jobs she held until she began working at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, in 1966 as a tour guide. She talks about working at the information desk at the Oregon Legislature from 1967 to the time of the interview in 1992, including facing sexism on the job. She describes her observations on the Legislature over her two and a half decades there, including on lobbyists, rumors, and inaugural changes. She also talks about the history of the Capitol building, as well as organizing holidays and exhibits at the building; the gift shop; and school tours. She closes the interview by speaking briefly about the personalities of many legislators over the years.

Bell, Frankie (Frances Estelle), 1937-

Oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada

This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon.

In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

Yada, Tatsuro, 1916-2003

Oral history interview with John Y. Murakami

This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami's home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 13, 1992, Murakami discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Sherwood, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon. He talks about the grocery store that his father, Shuichi Sam Murakami, owned; his experience during the Depression; and his education. He discusses jobs he worked after dropping out of high school and talks about playing in the Nisei Baseball League.

In the second interview session, conducted on July 14, 1992, Murakami continues discussing his experiences in the Nisei Baseball League, as well as his interest in other sports. He also talks about his social life as a teenager. He speaks about a few instances of prejudice that he experienced. He discusses his experience in the U.S. Army, serving in the European Theater during World War II. He also talks about the U.S. government's incarceration of his family at the Minidoka War Relocation Center, and about his marriage to Sumi Matsushita. He then discusses his life in Portland after his discharge from the Army in 1945, including working in construction and teaching building construction at Benson Polytechnic High School.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on July 20, 1992, Murakami talks about his children, their education, their families, and their careers. He then talks about his retirement activities, particularly his involvement in Japanese American community organizations. He also revisits the topic of his Army experience during World War II. He shares his opinion about the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which granted redress to Japanese Americans whom the government incarcerated during the war. He closes the interview by reflecting upon his life and accomplishments.

Murakami, John Y. (John Yoneo), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

This oral history interview with Cecil Edwards was conducted by Irvin Luiten from May 18 to 26, 1988. In the interview, Edwards discusses his family history and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his education and early interest in government. He then talks about his experiences working for the Oregon Legislature beginning in 1933. He discusses the old Capitol building, which burned down in 1935; campaigns he worked on, and the role of lobbyists. He also talks about working as secretary for Governor Charles Sprague. Edwards then describes his service in the National Guard during World War II, particularly working with horses and dogs. He talks about returning to work in Oregon government after the war ended, including serving on the Racing Commission; being fired by Governor Mark Hatfield; lobbying for the Oregon Cattlemen's Association; and returning to the Legislature to work as a secretary. He discusses the numerous committees he was secretary for, including the agriculture committee, fish and game committee, and land-use board. Edwards next discusses his tenure as secretary of the Senate from 1965 to 1975, focusing on many of the legislators he worked with, including Clarence Barton, Debbs Potts, and Jason Boe. He also speaks at length about redistricting, as well as the duties of the secretary of the Senate and Senate rules.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Howard Hobson

  • SR 9354
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-28 - 1982-07-02

This oral history interview with Howard Hobson was conducted by Linda S. Dodds from June 28 to July 2, 1982, at Hobson's home in Portland, Oregon. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Hobson discusses his early life in Portland, including his interest in athletics. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, particularly his involvement in college sports. He discusses studying at Columbia University in New York, New York, including his social life, playing local sports, and returning to Portland. He speaks at length about his career as a college football, baseball and basketball coach, particularly at the University of Oregon. He also briefly talks about his reasons for leaving Oregon to coach at Yale University, his work on the Olympic committee, and working for Ronald Press Publishing Company in New York. He closes the interview by discussing changes in the game of basketball, his writing projects, and awards he has received.

Hobson, Howard, 1903-

Oral history interview with Margaret G. Fritsch

  • SR 9318
  • Collection
  • 1982-03-29

This oral history interview with Margaret G. Fritsch was conducted by Linda S. Dodds on March 29, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Fritsch discusses her family background and early life in Salem, Oregon. She talks about studying architecture at the University of Oregon, including the discrimination she faced as a woman. She then discusses her career as an architect, including the process of obtaining a license and some of the buildings she designed early in her career. She also talks about serving as secretary of the Oregon State Board of Architect Examiners. Fritsch discusses some of the architects she worked with, including Jamieson Parker and A.E. Doyle. She also talks about the architecture career of her husband, Frederick Fritsch. She briefly talks about adopting a child after Frederick Fritsch's death in 1934. She describes the effect the Depression had on their careers. She talks about working as a city planner for Juneau, Alaska, and her retirement in 1974. She closes the interview by talking about working with craftspeople; designing plinths for public art; and changes in the field of architecture.

Fritsch, Margaret G., 1899-1993

Oral history interview with Maurine B. Neuberger

This oral history interview with Maurine B. Neuberger was conducted by Clark Hansen from August 26 to December 12, 1991. The interview was conducted over eight sessions. The first session was conducted at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, while the rest were conducted at Neuberger's home in Portland.

In the first session, conducted on August 26, 1991, Neuberger discusses her family background and early life in Wilsonville, Oregon, including working on her grandparents' Salem farm, her education, and her memories of World War I. She talks about her experience at Monmouth College (now Western Oregon University), and then at the University of Oregon. She talks about teaching high school after graduating in 1929. She shares her memories of the Depression, her excitement at the election of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and living in Portland. She also talks about teaching in Providence, Rhode Island, for a year, and discusses a trip to Japan and China in 1940 and a trip to Europe in the 1930s. She discusses her involvement in the teachers' union, her summer activities, and meeting Dick Neuberger.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 30, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her husband, Dick Neuberger, including his expulsion from Oregon State University and some of his early political beliefs. She also talks about their marriage, Dick Neuberger's early political career, and the development of the Oregon Democratic Party in the 1940s and 1950s. Neuberger then discusses her service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955, including her campaign, her focus on civil rights and education, and her committee assignments. She also talks about the urban/rural divide in the Legislature and the state Legislature's relationship with the Oregon federal delegation.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 6, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955. She talks about legislation she worked on, particularly regarding billboards, consumer protection, education, and tax deductions for child care expenses. She speaks about lobbyists, reactionary right-wing groups, and the timber industry.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on September 13, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955. She continues talking about legislation she worked on, particularly regarding education. She talks about her re-election in 1953, her constituency, and her relationship with the press. She also talks about the salary she earned as a legislator, as well as the social life in Salem. She discusses Oregon state taxes, and the need for an annual legislative session. She then discusses Dick Neuberger's service in the Oregon Senate from 1949 to 1954 and talks about his campaign for the United States Senate in 1954.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on November 29, 1991, Neuberger discusses moving to Washington, D.C., in 1955. She talks about helping Dick Neuberger set up his Senate office, and about his staff. She discusses Dick Neuberger's service in the U.S. Senate from 1955 to 1960. She discusses his committee assignments, legislation he worked on, and senators he worked with. She also talks about Dick Neuberger's relationship with Senator Wayne Morse. She speaks about her social life and other activities while in Washington, D.C. She then talks about Dick Neuberger's failing health and his death from cancer in 1960. She discusses running for her husband's Senate seat later that year and speaks at length about her campaign. She talks about her service in the U.S. Senate from 1960 to 1965. She discusses her committee assignments and senators she worked with.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on December 9, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the U.S. Senate. She talks about the facilities available to women in the Senate building, legislation she worked on, and working with the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson administrations. She discusses some of the world events that occurred during her service, including the Cuban Missile Crisis. Neuberger and Hansen then look at and discuss photographs.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on December 10, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the U.S. Senate. She talks about her relationship with various foreign diplomats, shares her memories of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, and describes her vote for the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin resolution. She talks about the nominees to the U.S. Supreme Court during the 1950s and 1960s, as well as some of the senators she worked with. She describes some of the major pieces of legislation during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration, including the 1964 Civil Rights bill and the War on Poverty. She discusses her own legislative agenda, her reasons for not pursuing a second term, and her marriage to Philip Solomon in 1964. She also talks about her senatorial staff.

In the eighth and final interview session, conducted on December 12, 1991, Neuberger discusses her relationship with the Democratic Party and reflects on her final years the U.S. Senate. She continues talking about her senatorial staff. She then talks about her activities since leaving politics, including teaching at Radcliffe College, sitting on various commissions, and serving as an inspector of embassies. She shares her opinion of President Richard M. Nixon, and recounts witnessing him hitting his wife in public. She also shares her opinion of the Democratic Party leadership, as well as prominent Oregon politicians at the time of the interview in 1991, including Mark Hatfield. She closes the interview by talking about the expense of campaigning, the increasing role of women in politics, and her thoughts about the future.

Neuberger, Maurine B. (Maurine Brown), 1907-2000

Oral history interview with Howard Morgan

This oral history interview with Howard Morgan was conducted by Clark Hansen from August 25 to October 7, 1992. The interview was conducted in three sessions. Rosina Morgan was also present and contributed to the interview during the first session.

In the first session, conducted at Morgan's boat in Portland on August 25, 1992, Morgan discusses his family background, as well as the family background of his wife, Rosina Morgan. He talks about his early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, including his recreational activities, his education, and jobs he worked during the Depression. He also speaks briefly about spending a few years living with his aunt in San Francisco, California. He briefly discusses his experiences at the University of Oregon and Reed College. He talks about the jobs he worked during his college years, his memories of Pearl Harbor, and his experiences at the University of Berkeley. He speaks at length about working for the Office of Defense Transportation in Washington, D.C., and then for the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He describes his role in supplying equipment to the Navy and discusses spending time in Natal, Brazil, and in the Pacific Theater. The Morgans discuss their courtship and marriage. Rosina Morgan talks about her education and raising a family while Howard Morgan was working for the Navy.

In the second session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland on October 6, 1992, Morgan revisits the topic of working for the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He talks about instances of fraud and waste that he uncovered during that time. He talks about his activities after his discharge in 1945, including ranching and working for the American Veterans Committee. He also talks about his friendships with Monroe Sweetland and Dick Neuberger. Morgan then discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party of Oregon, particularly his efforts to make the Democratic Party competitive in Oregon. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives in 1949, including his election and his experience as a legislator in the minority party. He talks about lawmakers he worked with and legislation he worked on. He then discusses his service as chair of the Democratic Party of Oregon, including recruiting people to run for office, increasing the influence of the party, and recruiting Wayne Morse. He speaks about the various political campaigns he was involved in and talks about the legislative careers of Democrats who were elected during his time as chair.

In the third and final session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society on October 7, 1992, Morgan continues speaking about the various political campaigns he was involved in and the legislative careers of Democrats who were elected during his time as chair. He also talks about his admiration for Adlai Stevenson and working for Stevenson's 1956 presidential campaign, as well as his experience at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. He goes on to talk about Oregon Democratic politics and politicians after he left the position of party chair. He then talks about his accomplishments during his service as Public Utility Commissioner from 1957 to 1959, and describes his dealings with some private utility companies, particularly Pacific Power & Light and the Portland Traction Company. He describes his accomplishments as a member of the Federal Power Commission from 1961 to 1963, and talks about his experience living in Washington, D.C. He talks about his reasons for running for the Oregon Senate in 1966 as an anti-Vietnam War candidate. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Morgan, Howard, 1914-

Oral history interview with Wilber Henderson

  • SR 9448
  • Collection
  • 1965?

This oral history interview with Wilber Henderson was conducted by Charles S. Crookham in Crookham's chambers at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, around 1965. The date is given as September 23. Stephen Parker was also present. Parker's name was given in the audio, but not spelled. The spelling of his name cannot be verified.

In this interview, Henderson speaks at length about his involvement in a balloon race during the 1914 Rose Festival in Portland, and his experiences of being lost in the woods after an emergency landing. He then discusses his military service during the Mexican Border War. He closes the interview by discussing how he earned the nickname Major.

Henderson, Wilber, 1887-1966

Oral history interview with Zsuzsanna Vamos

This oral history interview with Zsuszanna Vamos was conducted by Sankar and Briana Ybanez on August 20, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Vamos discusses her family background and early life in Budapest, Hungary, including conditions under the Communist government, her education, and listening to American radio as a teenager. She talks about her interest in chemistry and her admiration for Marie Curie, as well as her experiences attending Semmelweis University to study pharmacology. She discusses her marriage to Istvan Adany and his career, and she talks about her career in biomedical research and frustration at her inability to do the research she wanted. She then talks about applying for jobs in other countries, which led to a job offer from Kansas University Medical Center. She describes the process of immigrating to the United States and adjusting to life afterward. She talks about her children, their careers, and their families. She discusses getting her green card in 1997, Istvan Adany's career in the U.S., and their move to Hillsboro, Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her work as an artist, her thoughts on the American Dream, and her reaction to the treatment of refugees at the time of the interview in 2018.

Vamos, Zsuzsanna, 1953-

Oral history interview with Masumi Timson

This oral history interview with Masumi Timson was conducted by Sankar Raman and Giacomo Ranieri on March 19, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Timson discusses her early life on Tokunoshima Island in Japan, including Japanese cultural practices and her early education. She describes her first time hearing the koto and her subsequent fascination with the instrument, as well as growing up in a musical family. She talks about studying koto music at Seiha Conservatory of Traditional Japanese Music while also studying English at Kansai Junior College (now known as Kansai Gaidai College) in Hirakata, Osaka. She describes the reception her koto performances received in Oregon and how that inspired her to become much more serious about her music. She talks about her marriage to Stephen F. Timson in 1977 and immigrating to the United States in 1991. She also describes some of the mechanics of the koto. She talks about teaching koto at the Willamette University Koto Club, performing in Oregon and Japan, and her longtime collaboration with Pink Martini. She also talks about her koto collection. She discusses her cultural and ethnic identity, particularly how the koto helps her keep her connection to her Japanese roots. She closes the interview by talking about the future of koto music in Japan, Japanese traditions and culture, and her koto students.

Timson, Masumi S. (Masumi Sakura), 1953-

Oral history interview with Jim Tsugawa

This oral history interview with Jim Tsugawa was conducted by Sankar Raman and Elizabeth Mehren on July 19, 2018. Amy Tsugawa, Jim Tsugawa's wife, was also present and contributed at the end of the interview. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Jim Tsugawa discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He describes his experience of being incarcerated by the U.S. government, including his family's detention at the Portland Livestock Pavilion and transfer to the Minidoka War Relocation Camp in Idaho. He also discusses his older brother Henry Tsugawa's military service during World War II. He talks about his family being sponsored by a reverend for residency in Boise, Idaho, and briefly describes his childhood there. He talks about the family renting a strawberry farm in Ontario, Oregon, and his high school experience in Beaverton, Oregon, particularly his interest in sports. He speaks briefly about attending Lewis & Clark College on a sports scholarship, then discusses his experience in the U.S. Army and being stationed in Zweibrücken, Germany, during the Korean War. He talks about studying at Oregon State University after his discharge, and about earning his degree in dentistry from the University of Oregon Dental School, which is now part of Oregon Health & Science University. He then briefly speaks about his marriage to Amy Goda, now Amy Tsugawa, her family background, and her experience of incarceration by the U.S. government during World War II. He discusses the U.S. political climate at the time of the interview in 2018, particularly the Trump administration's immigration policies. Mehren and Tsugawa discuss the large Asian populations in California and Hawaii. Tsugawa describes a recent trip to the Minidoka National Historic Site and revisits the topics of his childhood and playing sports. Amy Tsugawa closes the interview by talking about spending her teenage years in postwar Japan.

Tsugawa, Jim M. (James Masao), 1932-

Oral history interview with Lori Stegmann

This oral history interview with Lori Stegmann was conducted by Sankar Raman and Alia Burck on September 7, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Stegmann discusses her adoption in 1960 from South Korea through Holt International. She describes her early life in Lincoln City and in Gresham, Oregon, including encountering racism at a young age, her family life, and her early education. She talks about attending high school reunions, her involvement with school stage productions, and her early role models. She also talks about the lack of Asian representation in Western media. She discusses the career path that led her to become a member of the Gresham City Council, including working as an insurance agent. She talks about her decision to change her party affiliation from Republican to Democratic in 2018 and the rise of overt racism in the Republican Party since the 2016 election. She talks about her daughter, her adoptive family, and her connection to the Asian and Pacific Islander communities in east Multnomah County. She also talks about a trip she took to South Korea in 2017. She closes the interview by discussing her experience being a person of color raised by a white family, and her interest in Korean culture.

Stegmann, Lori, 1960-

Oral history interview with Felix Songolo

This oral history interview with Felix Songolo was conducted by Sankar Raman on February 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Songolo discusses his family background, the reasons his parents fled the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1997, and his early life in Lusaka, Zambia. He then talks about immigrating to the United States in 2004 and settling in Portland, Oregon. Hetalks about his siblings and his early education in Portland. He discusses the Catholic charities that facilitated his family's settlement in the U.S., as well as his own involvement in the Catholic Church. He talks about his parents' careers; describes his experience as one of only a few black students in his classes; and discusses his cultural and ethnic identity, as well as some of the discrimination he experienced. He speaks at length about his middle and high school education at Catholic schools. He discusses experiences in the eighth grade that helped him to become more comfortable with his African heritage and to take his education seriously. He then speaks at length about his education as De La Salle North Catholic High School; applying for college; and playing soccer. He talks about his plans for college at Georgetown University, his volunteer work on behalf of immigrants and refugees, and scholarships he has applied for. He closes the interview by talking about his thoughts on the American Dream.

Songolo, Felix (Felix Uredi Faraja), 2000-

Oral history interview with Brenda Neri-Wong

This oral history interview with Brenda Neri-Wong was conducted by Sankar Raman and Briana Ybanez on August 22, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Neri-Wong discusses her family background and the blood disorder that spurred her parents to bring her to the United States in 1995. Neri-Wong continues discussing her family background, particularly her connection to her Chinese heritage, her family's financial situation in Mexico, and their journey to the United States. She talks about moving to Oregon, her education, and learning English as a second language. She also speaks about trying to fit in and make friends, and about her plans to become a teacher. She shares her experience as an undocumented immigrant, the constant anxiety it has caused, and the barriers it placed before her. She discusses attending Portland Community College and transferring to Portland State University, including paying for college and learning to navigate the higher education system as an undocumented immigrant. She then talks about her current job as a graduation coach in the Hillsboro School District. She discusses her status as a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which provides legal protections for some undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. She talks about her hopes for the future. She closes the interview by talking about the political climate at the time of the interview in 2018, her experience with white privilege, and working toward systemic change.

Neri-Wong, Brenda J., 1993-

Interview with Eva Rickles

This interview with Eva Rickles was conducted by Paul Fardig and Judith Fardig in 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. This interview was conducted informally during a photo shoot. In this interview, Rickles discusses her childhood dog, Wippi, whom she had to leave behind when her family fled Nazi Germany in 1937. She also talks about some of the items her family brought with them to the United States, particularly family photographs and a grandfather clock. She speaks about the family background of her husband, Norman H. Rickles; the Enlightenment as it applied to the European Jewish community (known as Haskalah); and several of the artworks in her home. She and the interviewers make small talk away from the recording device for several minutes. Rickles closes the interview by reading from her father's diary; discussing her early education at a synagogue in Berlin, Germany; and describing the differences in English dialects. She and the interviewers make small talk for the remainder of the audio recording.

Rickles, Eva S. (Eva Simons), 1927-

Oral history interview with Hanin Najjar

This oral history interview with Hanin Najjar was conducted by Ibrahim Ibrahim on December 19, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Najjar discusses the reasons her parents came to the United States from Saudi Arabia shortly after she was born. She talks about gender roles in Saudi Arabian culture, her ethnic and cultural identity, and wearing the hijab as an expression of her feminism. She also talks about discrimination she has experienced as a Muslim. Najjar discusses her plans for the future, including studying journalism at Pacific University and pursuing a career as a journalist.

Najjar, Hanin, 1999-

Oral history interview with Rahel Nardos

This oral history interview with Rahel Nardos was conducted by Sankar Raman and Maleya Luis on March 28, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Nardos discusses her early life in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, including life under communism, access to health care, and her education. She talks about her experience attending the International Community School in Addis Ababa as a scholarship student. She also talks about the famine in Ethiopia during the 1980s. She then talks about applying for college in the United States and attending Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania; about the barriers to her plans to attend medical school in the United States as an immigrant; and adjusting to life in the U.S. She also shares an anecdote about her first encounter with the U.S. customs agency. She discusses the U.S. political climate at the time of the interview in 2018, including her experiences with racism. She talks about attending Yale School of Medicine, including financing her education; her reasons for specializing in obstetrics and gynecology; and settling in Oregon. She speaks about a 2018 op-ed she wrote for the Oregonian newspaper, titled "My patients don't care I'm from a 'shithole' country," and talks about the increase in racism since Donald Trump was elected president in 2016. She discusses balancing family life with her career as a doctor; her work in women's health in Ethiopia with Footsteps to Healing; and her other volunteer work. She closes the interview by discussing her cultural and ethnic identity.

Nardos, Rahel

Oral history interview with Jaime Miranda

This oral history interview with Jaime Miranda was conducted by Keven Salazar on August 1, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. The interview was conducted in both English and Spanish. In the interview, Miranda discusses his business, M & M Marketplace, in Hillsboro, Oregon. He talks about his early life in Mexico City, Mexico, including making a living by helping his mother work as a street vendor. Miranda and Salazar then converse in Spanish for several minutes about Salazar's studies, as well as the diverse populations in Gresham and Beaverton, Oregon. Miranda then returns to the topic of his early life in Mexico City and speaks at length about growing up in poverty. He talks about living with his extended family in Juárez while his parents and siblings immigrated to the United States. Miranda and Salazar again converse informally in Spanish. Miranda then talks about joining his family in the U.S. at the end of 1985, and he discusses his life in California, including his education and working in the fields with his family. He closes the interview by discussing the importance of education.

Miranda, Jaime, 1974-

Oral history interview with Janet Liu

This oral history interview with Janet Liu was conducted by Sankar Raman and Jessica Pollard on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Liu discusses the reasons her parents and their families fled Communist China in 1949, her connection to Chinese culture, and her early life in Taipei, Taiwan. She also talks about the history of Japanese and Chinese oppression of native Taiwanese people. She discusses immigrating with her mother to the United States to join her father in Madison, Wisconsin, including adapting to American culture and the Midwestern climate, learning English, and her experience as the only Chinese student in her school. She talks about the 1961 executive order by President John F. Kennedy that enabled her family to immigrate to the United States. She then talks about her father's death a few years later and the subsequent threat of deportation; moving to California; and her education in the United States, including her interest in mathematics. She discusses receiving legal U.S. residency in 1968, studying math at San Jose State University and the University of California at Berkeley, and working as a computer programmer in San Jose. She talks about getting her MBA from Santa Clara University and pursuing a career in finance. She also talks about her marriage to her step-brother in 1989, as well as their divorce in 2001 due to his violence; the education and career of her daughter; and her real estate investments. She discusses her vegan diet; her life in Lake Oswego, Oregon; and her daughter's relationship with her father. She closes the interview by speaking about the difficulty of discussing domestic violence and the effect it had on her daughter.

Liu, Janet, 1951-

Oral history interview with Farooq Hassan

This oral history interview with Farooq Hassan was conducted by Sankar Raman on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Hassan discusses his early life in Basra, Iraq, including the history and culture of Iraq before 1958, and his early art education. He then talks about studying art at universities in Baghdad, Iraq, and Rome, Italy. He discusses returning to Iraq in 1980 and his experience during the Iran-Iraq War. He describes some of the atrocities of Saddam Hussein and how he managed to evade the militias. He also talks about his marriage to fellow artist Haifa Al Habeeb. Hassan discusses his artwork, including his influences and methods, and his career after the end of the Iran-Iraq War. He also talks about designing stamps for the Iraqi government and giving some of his works to the Iraq Museum. He describes his life after the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Hassan and Raman discuss an exhibition of Hassan's artwork planned for later in 2018. Hassan talks about his reasons for immigrating to the United States in 2010, and discusses his daughter and her family. Hassan talks about the materials he uses in his painting and drawing, the development of his art technique, and the loss of several of his paintings during the looting of the Iraq Museum in 2003. Hassan and Sankar look at some of Hassan's artworks and discuss them. Hassan closes the interview by talking about his career as an artist in the Pacific Northwest.

Hassan, Farooq, 1939-

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